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"Ahora, las cosas pueden cambiar."

Translation:Now, things can change.

5 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/thebrettbrett

why "las cosas"rather than just "cosas"? I read this as now, the things can change.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Because it is a general statement rather than a specific set of things changing. We saw this earlier when talking about people: Los hombres (Men), la humanidad (humanity), los ninos (children). The plural pronoun signals that you mean in general, although in context it can refer to a plural set of subjects: i.e, Las gentes del mundo (the peoples of the world)

If it makes you feel better, they accept a more literal translation of "Now, the things can change" so there is consistency at least.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wwang.1

Thanks. That helps!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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I don't think that "gente" takes an "S" ending for plural since "gente" is both singular and plural. Also, "gente" is a feminine noun.

The people of the world. = La gente del mundo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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These are two slightly different things.

La gente del mundo = The people of the world (as one group, so all of them)

Las gentes del mundo = The peoples of the world (the different groups, all of them) (see http://lema.rae.es/drae/?val=gentes)

Yeah, gente is fem. and that is my making a typo. Thanks for catching it

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DareILingo

Weighing in that while I support the translation, "Now the things can change," as acceptable, I want to make clear that "Now things can change" and "Now the things can change" are not equivalent in the English language.

"Now the things can change," would likely interpreted in a specific sense-- the "things" would refer to concrete objects. "I didn't think robots would ever gain sentience, but now the things can change themselves!" or "Those aren't the things I ordered!"

Also using the phrase "the things" is also more common in vernacular where you forget a word or something. "I need the... uh, uh... the, uh... the thing!" or "No, no, no, give me.... the... the red things! Over there! Yeah, those."

"Now things can change," would likely be interpreted in a general sense-- the "things" noun will be taken to refer abstract ideas or states. "There used to be a lot of bullying in this school, but now things can change" or "There was once a sense of continuity in my life, but I have found now that all things can change."

I believe that the Spanish form includes both of these possibilities, however?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rlamborn
rlamborn
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Why couldn't it be "Right now"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulToner2

Why not "right now, things can change."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dipish

Why "Now the things may change" is incorrect???

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shadd518
Shadd518
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It's just indicating they can. "may" suggests there's a possibility of things changing, where "can" means it's capable of it. Two different, though slight, meanings.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chaterlaine

I agree with you as well. I cannot think how to say "Now things may change in Spanish" if it is different from "poder cambiear." Can any experts help us on that? Does Spanish make such a distinction?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tumler100

Spanishdict translates "things may change" to "Las cosas pueden cambiar" http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/things+may+change

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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I'm with you. I think the best translation would be "Now, things may change". But I've had trouble in the past omitting the article and using "may" for poder.

Interesting, I was advised to use the "report a problem" button. I'll try it.

Nope. I guess since I got the answer, I can't gripe about the translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evan.Tracy

For some reason, I confused "cambiar" with "caminar", so I thought this sentence said, "Now the things can walk." Sounds like a great intro into a horror movie...

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Objectivist
Objectivist
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I thought this was about things you exchange at a store.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Hacer un cambio = to exchange (something in a store)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Undolf
Undolf
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"Ahora" can also mean "today", can it not?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JessieKWest

How would this sentence be used in a conversation? I am confused on the meaning.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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"The Republicans finally have control of both the executive and legislative branches. Now things can change."

"Australia just voted to allow gay marriage. Now things can change."

"My technophobic boss just retired, and has been replaced by a much younger, forward-thinking person. Now things can start to change around here."

I hope this helps.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrettRietv1
BrettRietv1
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I thought "Ahora" could translate to "Right now" i get a wrong answer with this though

7 months ago