"Water, please."

Translation:Uisce, le do thoil.

4 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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No surprise that ‘water’ looks like ‘whiskey’!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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Well, as it happens, "whiskey" in Irish is "uisce beatha" which literally means "life giving water"!.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NiallT
NiallT
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Almost - "water of life". It's a direct translation of the Latin "Aqua Vitae", as is the French "Eau-de-vie".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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And then there's Akvavit...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Another term for whiskey, often used in Connemara, is fuisce

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

And it happens that that's where the word "whiskey" comes from.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Smackson

or holy water

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aly907295

:'(

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elayna85356

uisce beatha is how you say whiskey It means water of life.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DongerBanks

Does "más é do thoil" not mean please too?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laranidh
laranidh
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It does, directly translated it is more along the lines of "if it is your will" I personally find that "le do thoil" is more informal than "mas é do thoil é" but both are perfectly fine to use.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DongerBanks

Cool, thanks :-D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brighid
Brighid
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Equally correct. I prefer that. When said quickly it sounds like one word.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/springbett
springbett
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What does "le do thoil" literally mean?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laranidh
laranidh
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It basically means "at your will," "Could you do that for me, at your will?" Hope that helps :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/springbett
springbett
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Thanks :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NatalieSto9

Does anyone have pointers on mastering spelling?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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Use hard words as passwords for different software, e.g.

iománaíocht or Tír Eoghain ;-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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There's a rule slender (e, i) before slender and broad before broad (a, o, u) which explains the second A in Pádraig and the I (I think) in Fáilte. That's about all I know. Hope that's a help.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barbara.gr5
barbara.gr5
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third time in a row I've had to do this translation. guess I won't be forgetting this one for a bit.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LouMimzy1
LouMimzy1
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I hear people talking about Slender and Broad when mentioning sounds. What does that mean? Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Most Irish consonants come in two varieties: “broad” (velarized) and “slender” (palatalized). A rough analogy in US English would be to compare two pronunciations of “coupon”; some people pronounce it as “coo-pahn” (using a “broad” C), and some people pronounce it as “queue-pahn” (using a “slender” C). A better analogy would be the distinction between hard consonants and soft consonants in Russian.

Whether a given Irish consonant is pronounced slender or broad depends upon the nearest vowel to it. If the nearest vowel is e, é, i, or í, then it’s a slender vowel, and the consonant is pronounced slender; otherwise, the nearest vowel is a broad vowel, and the consonant is pronounced broad. Note that the digraph ae is considered a single broad vowel for this rule. Also note that there are occasional exceptions to this rule; the most common exception is that the nearest vowel excludes those that cross a component word boundary in a compound word. For example, in the word sobhéasach (“well-bred”), the bh neighbors both the o (a broad vowel) and the é (a slender vowel). But since sobhéasach is a compound word, made from so + béasach, the so is ignored in determining the nearest vowel to the bh; thus, the é is the nearest vowel to the bh, and the bh is pronounced slender.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Muireann887607

Both of my answers are tecknically correct

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sheri14955

This is the best way to lrish.

11 months ago
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