Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"An buachaill agus an cailín."

Translation:The boy and the girl.

3 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TabulaRasa5

I have to remember than "an" isn't supposed to be "a/an" here, but "the." Woops!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drumming
drumming
  • 19
  • 16
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4

Haha, same! BTW I'm very excited about learning this language XD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lucy147595

I'm from Ireland. Honest to god it gets harder but ya

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patrice415073

Good to know!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/medieval-monk

yeah it can be a bit confusing but with repetition you'll get it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/milgurl15

I have the same problem. Also, because I take spanish already, i want to put in words like un/una or el/la/los/las.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charlotte997609

Same

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ciancheetham

With you there

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chloe43195

wow same XD but I wanted to learn this becauseI'm mostly Irish so....

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kiyomi43

So in English It can be used as "The boy and Girl" But it has to have THE before girl I am truly confused

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlyceGrey

I have a feeling I'm going to have to Forvo many words with this particular language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
Kelly-Rose
  • 23
  • 17
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 9

I can hear the "c" in buachaill from this audio but in past audios the "c" was silent. Can it be pronounced either way?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

There's no "c" sound in buachaill. There's supposed to be a <ch> sound. This audio is absolutely awful. Yes, though, you need to pronounce the <ch>.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
Kelly-Rose
  • 23
  • 17
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 9

Haha, okay thanks galaxyrocker! You're always so helpful. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joshuaorjosh33

<ch> as in "chew", "chorus", or "loch"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

<> represent spelling, not sound. I can see where it's confusing. The sound is /x/.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joshuaorjosh33

Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pandora679748

So it's like a sound in the back of the throat? Like loch?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GresoTheGropaga

/x/ is a velar fricative, meaning the sound is generated in the same spot as when you say /k/. Its 'back of the throat' equivalent would be /χ/, which is the sound of ⟨ch⟩ in standard German, Georgian, or some dialects of Dutch, for example. I believe this pronunciation is indeed used in some areas of Ireland as well, but don't quote me on that.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kate2911hamilton

it depends what sentence it is in in some it is "ch" but in others it is "c"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zecchino

No, it is always pronounced /x/ never /k/.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Miraclousgem

Its pronounced boo-cull

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GresoTheGropaga

There's no /k/ sound in there though.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobinAziz1

can cailin be spelled chailin because it is a female noun after an

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1443

No — cailín is a masculine noun (because it’s a diminutive ending with -ín), so it’s an cailín. It would be spelled an chailín when used genitively, though, e.g. cat an chailín (“the girl’s cat”).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Walrus273

Lol actually Ireland speaks Gaelige, but people only call it Irish because it is spoken by the Irish, and it is the main language in Ireland. BTW Jacksepticeye is in fact a very good youtuber XD.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mdwynn

OMG YES I LIKE U

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ciancheetham

I thought they spoke Gaelic. My name is Gaelic.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zecchino

Gaelic is a group of languages: Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Manx. So calling it Gaelic wouldn't be specific enough. Gaeilge is the Irish name for the language.

Now I know it clearly just means "Gaelic," so it's kind of confusing and I don't know how you refer to the other Gaelic languages in Irish, but that's what they call it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AriMcScrib

Can somebody give me the phonetics of pronouncing boy? Thank-you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1443

Its pronunciation in the three dialects can be heard here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrmanmrman

Can ye not put girl and boy instead of boy an girl

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boss_jade

man hard

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabaribyrd

fwfefe

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jade364345

Who else put the boy eat the girl?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mdwynn

I love the language, I love TG Lurgan on youtube, go look at it if you haven't heard of it, they have awesome music covers.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GresoTheGropaga

Why isn't "an cailín" lenited?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liamog
liamog
  • 15
  • 11
  • 7
  • 6

Because cailín is a grammatically masculine noun, which is not lenited after the definite article.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DylanMcGra4

Can someone help me how to pronounce "buachaill"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
  • 25
  • 17
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14

If you were translating "The boy and girl" (no second "the"), would you use "an" or "na" (because there are two of them)? If it's "an", is it mandatory to repeat it for "girl"?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fangirl_Gabby

I can't speak irish. I just decided to try it out for fun, and man, is it complicated.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EllaAllen9

hi

6 months ago