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"Maidin mhaith"

Translation:A good morning

4 years ago

64 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/aaabbbccceeefff

To me who's french it sounded like " ma jeune voix" litteraly "my young voice"...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PauBofill
PauBofill
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Hahaha I hadn't thought of it but now that I've heard it again I can see it truly sounds like ma jeune voix.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MerelViVeri
MerelViVeri
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Hahaha I thought the same! I'm Dutch but I learned French in secondary school, I heard the same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ladron
Ladron
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Exactly! According to basic pronunciation guides, this sound should not be possible - "vwa"/voix". mh should be "v" before i and e (slender) and "w" before a,u,o (broad). To switch them "va" rather than "wa" is strange enough, but to put broad and slender pronunciations together? edit- caveat - the guide I was using is based on Ulster

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeoDojo
LeoDojo
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http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fuaim/Maidin_mhaith! look here,it looks like the Munster one mixed with Connacht one,maybe this recording is from some area between both

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ladron
Ladron
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or the recorder had a bit of fuisce before

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMurray29

I do not understand you properly but I am from Ulster and I think you are getting my point across with some technical pronunciation system. It should sound more like 'my' than 'why'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMurray29

Yes, I am Irish and would pronounce it Ma-Jean-My well, sort of. But this audio is like Ma-Jean-Wife

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jenn2092
jenn2092
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"hello" sounds incredibly french. i have a feeling this robot pronunciation is not how it should really sound sometimes. even a subtle difference in accents can make it hard if not impossible to communicate.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jillianimal

There's 2 different recordings of the same phrase?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dallas_MG

Yeah, that confused me a bit too--I got them back to back

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClassyDuckling

Same. I wonder if you can say it either way, and it doesn't matter?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TedPs
TedPs
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Same here! Could somebody explain this? it does not make sense why there would be two different pronunciations of the same simple phrase!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMurray29

Simple, Irish is always spelt the same but pronunciation varies by region. I, being from Ulster, could not understand the accent.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0xAABBAA
0xAABBAA
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Same as well. I thought it might be because one sentence is spoken to a single person, while the other is directed at more than one person? similar to "dia duit" and "dia daoibh"... but then i would expect the spelling to change, too... so please someone clarify :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eddyc15

If it was directed at more than one person it wouldn't change. Maidin mhaith - good morning Maidin mhaith duit - good morning to you (s) Maidin mhaith daoibh - good morning to you (pl)

I couldn't tell you why they have different recordings. However, there are loads of different accents and dialects in Ireland. Maybe they're from different areas? Or maybe one's a recording and one's from a Text-To-Speech generator?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PauBofill
PauBofill
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Yeah, I'd say they're different dialects

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrumpyPian

For those who are interested, there are three main dialects in Ireland that correspond to three of the four provinces. Ulster, Connaught (pronounced Con-acht), and Munster have their own dialects. I have heard that Leinster typically uses the Munster dialect, but I believe Irish teachers from Ulster or Connaught will teach in their home dialect.

And I believe they spell and pronounce words differently.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julia9911

It was the same for me. Why? I'm confused--somebody explain please!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmandaTrou

If Irish ever wants to craft its own alphabet, I wouldn't be mad. I can't seem to grasp this spelling and it's mucking up my answers.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScarLegs

It has. It's known as Gaelic type. Though it's similar to Roman type. the main difference is that aspiration is written using a dot over the aspirated consonant rather than an 'h' after it. And it has the Tironian 'and' symbol.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snezhi
Snezhi
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Pardon the ignorance but is 'Gaelic type' commonly used in Ireland? In other words, when I go to Ireland will I be seeing signs using both alphabets?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeSuisJane
JeSuisJane
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Not really. Road signs have place names written in both English and Irish, for example, both using the same alphabet as in English. The Gaelic alphabet is mostly archaic, or romantic/artistic, if that makes sense :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrandApple
GrandApple
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Sound something like Mwajin mwa.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erchenswine
Erchenswine
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To me it sounds like mazhin vwa. xD

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChickenRunner02

Yeah

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/epingchris
epingchris
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That's what I heard too: I can sort of understand how slender d went from dj > j > zh, but broad mh is supposedly just w and I can't grasp why there seems to be a v sound in between......can someone explain?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sigmacharding
sigmacharding
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In school (east of ireland) we said "Maw-jin" "vah"

but "mwa" and "waw" were also common

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mediterranean

So is mh pronounced like V or like W in this case? And in all other cases? Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Teahl
Teahl
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Just depends on the dialect. The V sound is the Munster dialect.

http://breis.focloir.ie/en/fuaim/Maidin_mhaith!

Just check out that link! It gives you the pronunciation in Ulster, Connacht, and Munster.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mediterranean

Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LongHenry
LongHenry
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well no, it depends first on whether it is a broad or slender consonant, then we can talk about pronunciation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/norahmo

The most difficult part of learning Irish thus far is trying to grasp the spelling in relation to the pronunciation - especially since a lot of these don't have audio...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SquirrelJedi

what's the difference between Maidin maith and Maidin mhaith? Is it a typo

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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It should be Maidin mhaith, because maidin (being feminine) lenites the following adjective if possible.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread

In Ulster this is said more like 'mah-jin why'. Just thought I'd confuse things a bit more..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeSuisJane
JeSuisJane
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Haha, yes, but that's just due to the accent. Accent + dialect = confusion!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Is the correct pronunciation "Magin wah"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jb11131999
Jb11131999
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how do we know if it is feminine that way we know to leintion it ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RylanKahle

How come "mhaith" is spelled with an "h"?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Maidin is a feminine noun, so the adjective is lenited.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TinaConte

I'm confused as to why it's 'maidin' and 'maidin mhaith' and 'bean' but 'bhean mhaith.' Is it because one is a phrase and one is just a noun/adjective?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
Mod
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When you use feminine singular nouns with the definite article an, you add a lenition to the noun (if possible).

  • Maidin mhaith = (a) good morning
  • An mhaidin mhaith = the good morning
  • Bean mhaith = (a) good woman
  • An bhean mhaith = the good woman

Bhean mhaith would not be a grammatical phrase on its own.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zzxj
zzxj
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L, N, and R are the letters that can't be lenited.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dallas_MG

Why do you say "if possible"? When would it not be possible?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
Mod
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Not all letters can be lenited, so even if the noun is feminine the spelling will not change:

  • Léine mhaith = (a) good shirt
  • An léine mhaith = the good shirt
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dallas_MG

I'd also like to know this--I'm hoping there's some straightforward grammatical rule for why to do this and not just a "in this case" situation

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rkvance5
rkvance5
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I'm 100% certain that "maidin" and "maidin mhaith" are the only two phrases in this section.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LongHenry
LongHenry
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wait since when does SLENDER D become pronounced as a SLENDER G? i thought SLENDER D was pronounced (dʲ) not (ɟ)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JDLENL
JDLENL
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Why is Irish spelling so strange?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Because it has more sounds than the Latin alphabet has letters (for example, broad and slender versions of most consonants), so they had to come up with tricks to indicate those extra sounds.

Also because Irish like to show the base form of a word in mutated (lenited/eclipsed) forms, so they add letters rather than changing the initial letter the way Welsh (for example) does - where penn "head" would go to benn when lenited rather than to bpenn, etc, or how Cornish writes "an venyn vyghan" for "the small woman" which would be "an bhenyn bhyghan" in Irish style (the base words are "benyn" and "byghan" and they are lenited much as in Irish).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maia10133

Cant...... pronounce. ...........

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConchiCastillo
ConchiCastillo
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It practically sounds like "my young voice" in French ("ma jeune voix")! I keep comparing the sounds I'm learning to those I already know, as it helps me remember.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irisflower2

Sounds 50%irish 49%french 1% german

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mx.MUrton

This sounds more french than most of the other words i have seen...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PauBofill
PauBofill
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It sounds like "ma jeune voix" right? XD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjkmn

sounds french

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelDom82039

Maidi maith

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackaboy02

I said a good morning to you x"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hL16gFCQ

the audio said Maidin mhaith - I submitted maidin mhaith; it was marked incorrect but the correct answer was in fact Maidin mhaith. The only difference was that I had a lower case letter 'M' on maidin; surely that's not what was wrong??????

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Norravargen

For me it sounds "Matin Wah" is it correct?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gearoid526344

I said lovely morning and got it wrong , in ireland the common phrase would be lovely morning

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielDayot
GabrielDayot
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This sounds like Majin Buu from Dragon Ball. lol

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jenn2092
jenn2092
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just dont listen to the pronunciation. google that stuff and practice vocab and grammar with duolingo. its obviously off a lot of the time.

1 year ago