"Ithim cairéad."

Translation:I eat a carrot.

4 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MagdaKrok

It should be i eat carrots because even though irish is a wierd language even in it "i eat carrot" doesnt make sense

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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“Carrots” is cairéid rather than cairéad ; “I eat a carrot” would be the usual English translation for this exercise.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogruman
rogruman
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how could i make the difference between "i eat carrot" (in general) and "i eat a carrot"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Well, to me, 'I eat carrot' sounds very weird. I'd say 'I eat carrots'. But there's generally no difference.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogruman
rogruman
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If i asked you if you like carrot, you could answer "yeah, i eat carrot". it wouldn't mean that you are eating one right now though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/savourtardis
savourtardis
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But because carrots are extremely countable, use of the singular "carrot" like that in English is pretty unusual.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huffdogg

I would never say "I eat carrot." If you asked me that question I'd say "I eat carrots" to mean that they are a part of my diet or "I am eating carrots" to mean right at this moment.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReaperPaladin

I eat CARROT!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oisin_Gavril2001

i eatcarroty

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaireNiFhiach

I put down I eat carrots and was told I was wrong' they said the answer was I eat carrot.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/science_ed
science_ed
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Carroty McCarrotface

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dubhglasM

The correct answer was given as 'I eat carrot', but 'carrot' is a count noun, therefore the correct expression in English is 'I eat carrots'. The form 'I eat carrot' would only be correct if 'carrot' was a mass noun, ie a 'stuff' rather than things.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexinIreland
alexinIreland
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There was a mistake with some brackets in the Incubator that I just fixed. Really, the only correct translation for this is "I eat a carrot" (if you wanted to be more literal, you could omit the indefinite article, but then it's not correct English). "I eat carrots" would be "Ithim caréid"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/torowan
torowan
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"I eat carrot" can be said in the right context. E.g.: "Do you eat any vegetables at all? Yes! I eat carrot.."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/panizharfa
panizharfa
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http://www.panningtheglobe.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/moroccan-carrots-web.jpg Couldn't I say "I eat carrot" eating a salad like this? Some unspecified amount of carrot

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dubhglasM

I could also imagine making a carrot cake and, worrying about allergies, asking someone 'do you eat carrot?'. So what's normally a count noun can be coerced into a mass noun interpretation, but that doesn't mean it's the normal usage. But I have no idea how you would express this meaning in Irish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Graham453604

Someone offers you a bowl of grated carrot. Would you like carrot?I guess it is then 'some carrot', but 'carrot' works for me.

1 year ago
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