"Come here immediately."

Translation:Ven aquí inmediatamente.

5 years ago

88 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/aquacmj82

At this point in the lessons, we really haven't covered imperative forms.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zumbagal

That's true. In fact, this form of venir hasn't been covered at all.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chadrichards12

They're not covered hardly at all during the entire course. But they're quite easy as I've figured out so far. You just use the usted form for positives for instance, come here! Ven aqui! And the Tu form for negatives, such as, Don't talk like that to me! No me hablas asi! Please correct me if I've wrong. That's what I've figured out so far. I might be wrong however.

Hope this helps!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ejgrimley
ejgrimley
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Well...yes and no. The usted form IS used for positive commands to a "tú" person. But there are exceptions, including the irregular verb form of venir. Usted VIENE. But, yes, VEN aquí. Several common verbs do this.

The negative form of commands for a "tú" is ALMOST the regular version- but the final vowel of the verb changes. So hablar --> no me hablEs. Comer --> no ComAs tanto. Decidir --> no te decidas ahora.

There are also separate conjugations for imperatives directed toward usted, ustedes, and vosotros. But uh....one thing at a time, right? :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/journeyman171

Isn't ven an ustedes form? Since it has the N?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

No, that would be "vienen." Spanish commands have different conjugation than the indicative form. The applicable rules don't really matter here, though, because the imperative form of "venir" is irregular. You just have to remember that the imperative "tú" form of "venir" is "ven."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tmichal2

Find the pattern, my friend!

For all regular verbs, remove infinitive ending and add: tom-AR: tu tomA com-ER: tu comE viv-IR: tu vivE

Notice how the second person imperative is identical to the third person singular present indicative conjugation?

Additionally...

The él/usted PLUS the nosotros imperatives are identical to their subjunctive counterparts (maybe a conjugation you haven't learned yet). But for example...

Imperative of "tomar" in usted form: tome Subjunctive of "tomar" in third person singular: tome

Imperative of "tomar" in nosotros form: tomemos Subjunctive of "tomar" in first person plural: tomemos

Imperative of "tomar" in ustedes form: tomen Subjunctive of "tomar" in ustedes form: tomen

See how you can group things like this together? It will prove extremely helpful in learning the various tenses in Spanish. And rules like this apply to 95%+ of verbs, which is extremely helpful. And almost always if they are irregular, ONLY the tu form of the imperative will be irregular outside of this pattern. Example:

Venir: tu ven usted venga (same as subjunctive) nosotros vengamos (same as subjunctive)

Take a look at this website, which is extremely helpful: www.conjugation.org

I hope this helped!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YehudaF

I have no idea what in the world subjunctive is.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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It's a mood of the verb (as opposed to the indicative we usually use). English lost nearly all of it's subjunctive forms and we usually express it with "may" or "might" as a helping verb.

Personally, I hate the subjunctive and have found it to be annoying in every language I've ever learned. I'm pretty sure the ancients concocted it to annoy us. They must have been jealous of our technology.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fabwash

The subjunctive is not just a "mood" form, it's used in other ways as well. You may hate it, but it's part of the language, and it will sound "odd" or "wrong" to someone if you don't use it, or use it incorrectly. It's a bit like someone telling you "I cutted my finger yesterday"; you will understand, but it's wrong.

I find the subjunctive a beautiful thing. Embrace it instead of hating it, try to find the beauty in how it changes the verb and brings a twist to the conversation. It turns out that the Spanish subjunctive is one of the easiest subjunctives (try the French one..) to learn, and the most logical.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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The subjunctive is indeed a mood. It's a grammatical term. Most verbs are indicative mood and some imperative mood.

And I don't truly hate it, I just find it too easy to make errors when it comes to mood.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fabwash

Hi, yes I agree it's not natural for English speakers, even native speakers make mistakes!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timmyshanti
timmyshanti
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il faut que tu sache ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirsten594910

Il faut que tu saches

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ejgrimley
ejgrimley
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The only easy to think of example of subjunctive use in English is when we say, "If I WERE a rich man....". Most people know that the past tense conjugation for "I" is was (and some even get confused and "correct" it to if I was...). But we're nit actually using the past here. We're talking about um ..an alternate reality basically. Languages use the subjunctive to highlight the falseness or doubt of the statement.

While subjunctive is a very important subject, not knowing it won't harm your communication too much, at least for now

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I have posted elsewhere this example of a present tense English subjunctive: Fe! Fie! Fo! Fum!/I smell the blood of an Englishman!/BE he live or BE he dead/I'll grind his bones to make my bread.

Just as the past tense English subjunctive uses "were," the present tense English subjunctive uses "be." However, present tense subjunctive is archaic in English, and only used in old literature such as in the above quoted nursery rhyme.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Finla1cl

that totally helped! im finding it difficult to find patterns because you cant tell how the word is being used until after you get it wrong. but other than that, yeah

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
Huysan
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I think it would help if there is exclamation point for imperative sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tmichal2

It does seem like that would make sense, but Spanish differs from English in that the imperative needn't be exclamatory (although there are times in English this is true, too). Example: Speaking to a child who refuses to eat their food, "Eat." No need to exclaim, but it is an imperative command.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valencys

thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AwwwMan

Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josephricafort

It actually told me that the correct answer is "Venid", not Venir which confuses me more.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/justme5155

I got the same correction.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yodeling

Ugghh, so many verb tenses, and now I have to memorize the imperatives... :(

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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I believe there are something like 14 verb tenses total for the Spanish language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

There are five grammatical tenses (depending on whether you consider the conditional to be a mode of its own or a tense of the indicative mode). But the conjugation of a verb does not depend only on its tense. Don't confuse tense and mode.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elenitsa17

Please explain further. I have completed the Spanish tree, but I don't find it enough just yet. Perhaps, I need to do it more times for it all to gel, but any information at this point is greatly appreciated.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

The form (conjugation) of a Spanish verb depends on person, number, tense, and mode. Person, of course, indicates the relationship of the actor to the speaker and the listener (I/you/he) and number is singular or plural (we/you all/they).

Tense expresses the verb's relationship with time. In Spanish, there are conjugations for present, future, perfect (past actions that have finished) and preterite (past actions that may not have finished).

There are other tenses that can be formed by means other than additional conjugations. They use various tenses of the auxilliary verbs "haber" (to have done) or "estar" (to be occurring). Although, you do need to know two more verb forms to construct these, the past and present participle (roughly the equivalent of "-ed" and "-ing" forms in English). These are a bit simpler because the participles do not have person, tense, or number. The auxilliary verb takes care of that.

Mode is different. It expresses the verb's relationship with fact. The primary mode is the indicative, expressing that the action is a fact (whether past, present, or future). The imperative mode expresses not a fact, but a command. The subjunctive mode is non-factual, hypothetical, or subjective. The conditional mode expresses uncertainty or contingency (if/then). You can roughly think of these modes as things that are, things that must or mustn't be, things that ought or ought not be, and things that might be.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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Very thorough! The only thing I'll add is most grammar books I've used refer to it as mood, not mode. In fact, I've only seen Spanish grammarians use the term mode. Metalanguage is a strange thing when you think about it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

There's not really anything to memorize except for a small number of irregular imperatives (such as "ven"). Generally speaking, the imperative is the same as either the present subjunctive (for formal commands, or negative informal commands), the present indicative formal (for informal affirmative commands), or the infinitive (for commands addressed generally rather than to a particular person).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

¡Ánimo! ;]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim.Lockwood

This is one I recognize from Hispanic mass. There is one particular part where all the people say, "¡Ven, Señor Jesús!" meaning, "Come, Lord Jesus!"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JodiBeth

So, Jesus is in the tú form not usted?! Interesting. Where's the respect? ;-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim.Lockwood

As it turns out, it has nothing to do with a lack of respect, but more to do with the fact He is an approachable God whom we can address directly in a familiar way, not a scary or distant God who must be approached with fear. It's a subtle thing that doesn't make itself known in all languages but shows up in Spanish.

Not trying to start a big religious discussion, but it is interesting to note the implications of everyday things that we say in one language that have an additional layer of meaning in another language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JodiBeth

I agree- I just thought it was interesting given that it the phrase is said in a catholic mass- not an evangelical setting where an informal address is more common. Soy cristiana tambien!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim.Lockwood

It is no accident. Here is the full exchange:

C. Éste es el Sacramento de nuestra fe.

T. Anunciamos tu muerte, proclamamos tu resurrección. ¡Ven, Señor Jesús!

C = celebrante T = todos

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I was taught that addressing God/Jesus familiarly had to do with the fact that the familiar form is used for relatives, friends, anyone with whom you have rapport, and younger people in general. Because Jesus is the Son and not the Father, maybe it has to do with Jesus being THE Child of God.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MorganVar60
MorganVar60
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It has nothing to do with being the Son and not the Father. In English, traditional prayer uses the intimate form "thou" to address not only Jesus, but God the Father, Mary, and adult saints. "Our Father . . . hallowed be THY name", "Hail Mary . . . the Lord is with THEE", " St. Michael . . . THOU Prince of the Heavenly Host", etc.

In Spanish, the "tu" form is used in those same prayers; "Padre nuestro . . . santificado sea tu Nombre"; Or "Dios te salve, Maria". Or "San Miguel . . . tú Príncipe de la Milicia Celestial".

German uses the intimate "du" in prayer, including the ones above. Such use is meant to express greater intimacy with Whomever is being addressed, whether Father, Son, or someone else.

English speakers only started using "you" in prayer after "thou" fell out of use, and "you" became the intimate form for everyday usage.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susan-Robinson

it's like using "thou" in english

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dankdoes

I'm curious to know how often "inmediatamente" is used or if there are other more common expressions

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ejgrimley
ejgrimley
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I usually hear "ahorita," a more urgent form of "ahora," meaning now. It means right now, and if mom tells you "ven aqui ahorita," you're in trouble!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

It's interesting that they use the diminutive for that, but it makes sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ejgrimley
ejgrimley
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I've seen the -ito suffix used as amplification more than once. Examples include ahorita, tranquilito (quite calm), and rapidito (really quickly). It seems kind of confused to my English speaking brain, but I'm not the boss :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I really liked your example. Hadn't heard the definition of the prefix "-ita" as "right now." Had heard of bonita/very pretty, so I guess "ito/ita" is similar to comparative/superlative forms of adjectives, not sure which though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jazzfreak

My Spanish friends tend to say "en seguida"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nenjotsu
nenjotsu
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Why it is "venid aqui inmediatamente" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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This is the vosotros form of the word, why they gave it as the correct answer, I don't know. DL usually avoids using this form.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crystal_Seas

Probably because it was closer to the answer you gave then the more common correct answer which is "ven"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dhaas70

I always heard this as being venaca inmediatamente - but then it is good to see other ways to say it as well

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

dhaas70:; In my experience living with families in Mexico, the mamá always says "Ven acá" to her kids, never "Ven aquí"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dhaas70

That is my experience as well, but then I also live in Arizona, and the majority of mu neighbors are Mexican - so I am also used to the same thing. You must admit though that hearing other ways is very useful... :) Thanks for the reply!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cinthiia_mc
cinthiia_mc
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Ven acá is more latin american, and Ven aquí is more european spanish, as I learned in my course. It's good to search for the accent/variant you want/prefer to speak and always go with it. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crystal_Seas

That is what I put and it was correct: "ven acá inmediatamente"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjacobs

This appeared to be imperative. I assumed it was "tu" imperative.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjacobs

Sorry - I see that I used the ir instead of venir.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamsrow

imperative verb forms at this stage. gimme a break.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RachelleGi1

It says ven is the right word but it didn't specifically say the subject as a plural so I just put in viene to indicate one person.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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@RachelleGi1 "Ven" here isn't plural. Check out this dictionary/conjugator: http://www.wordreference.com/conj/EsVerbs.aspx?v=venir Scroll all of the way down to Imperative. You will see "ven" is for someone you would "tú". I hope this helps! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

Normally you would expect the imperative to be "viene," but it turns out "venir" has an irregular imperative.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MsWheezer

Viene should be accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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Since this is an imperative (command) you have to use the imperative conjugations.
tú - ven
Ud. - venga
Nosotros - vengamos
Uds. vengan

The sentence isn't saying He comes here, it is telling someone to Come here!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmuLampen

And -

Vos - vení

Vosotros - venid

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spanish-lady

I answered "venga por aqui inmediatamente" - marked incorrect - is the "por" what made it incorrect?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crystal_Seas

Yes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krisykp

It is telling me the correct form is 《vendid aquí》. What?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

"Vendid" or "venid"? "Venid" is the imperative of the voseo plural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdunCitadel

Also we should use tu as a possible answer

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/57flora

I think i need a lesson in definitikn for grammer i love all the help but so lost in understanding

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edjunaidi
edjunaidi
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What is venid? I don't think I have found this conjugation so far.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ejgrimley
ejgrimley
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Have you learned vosotros at all? It means 'you guys, casually.' Where ustedes might be used for an esteemed audience, vosotros is used (practically only in Spain) for, possibly, a group of young students. As tu is to usted, vosotros is to ustedes. So venid is the command/imperative for vosotros + venir. "You (young folks) come here!" Although I have to say, I also heard the subjunctive used in place of the technically correct imperative for this very specific instance: "vengais, chicos!" Not surprising given the prevalence of subjunctive in imperative form. Sorry, I can't explain anything without being wordy :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CherBatema

What if it's just one person you're talking to?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

"Ven aquí inmediatamente" is for just one person. Multiple people would be "vengan" (or if you were addressing no group in particular, you could use the infinitive "venir", though impersonal commands are more typical of signage and such).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TimLacoe
TimLacoe
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¡Venga ahora!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eittek
eittek
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Thanks for tricking me, duo :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jnp809

Am I the only one who was confused by word order? I thought adverbs went next to verbs, please help

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

Adverbs can go after verb objects when the object is very brief (unlike in English, where you can still do this when the object is quite a long phrase).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Treefrog986

Do you know who is doing the verb?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

It's a command, which makes it implicitly second person ("you"). In this case the conjugation indicates that it's a single subject who the speaker may address informally.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleMunz
KyleMunz
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Speaking from experience, "Ven acá ahorita" should be accepted. That is a phrase I heard frequently as a young kid in South America.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dianepcook

Why was aquí marked wrong, when Duo used it earlier in this lesson?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iesha831437

Sounds like someone got busted by their mom

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobinTaylor1

i miedayamente

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trish896771

I should always be able to skip a question that I can never get right because of technical errors.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zmjb1
zmjb1
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Diable

4 years ago
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