"Sú talún."

Translation:Strawberry.

4 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/NohTaebin
NohTaebin
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sú = juice? sú talún = strawberry? talún = ? ? = strawberry juice?

Please advise. Go raibh maith agat!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
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This is a bit complicated! on its own means juice. It is also an old-fashioned word for red berries in general, and it is still used today in combination with other words to give the names for two varieties of berry: sú talún (strawberry, literally "ground berry"), sú craobh (raspberry, literally "branch berry"). Strawberry juice is sú sútha talún ("juice of strawberries").

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NohTaebin
NohTaebin
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Wonderful explanation. Thank you Lancet! Your course is awesome :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gehayi
Gehayi
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How would we know that, since all they've told us so far is that "sú " means "juice" and "talún" means "strawberry"?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sliotar1

Duolingo never told you that talún means "strawberry", Duolingo told you that sú talún means "strawberry".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reordscop
reordscop
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Apparently "juice land" means strawberr????

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TseDanylo
TseDanylo
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Talún (or talamh) means more the physical land as in the soil and dirt. Land (as in country) would be tír.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smoshea

This comment made me laugh a lot.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Judah791387

In other words, LOL

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaid.
Jaid.
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In essentially all Germanic and Celtic languages, the word for ‹strawberry› is some variation on ‹ground berry› or ‹Earth berry›.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yah511
yah511
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Except English lol

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaid.
Jaid.
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No in English as well. Straw is commonly used as a form of groundcover insulation in farming, like mulch. While the format of the English word is a little different from the common pattern, it still loosely fits «berry that grows from the ground [in the straw]»

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TseDanylo
TseDanylo
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Erdbeere!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Whiskeyboxer

Guy above you said its literal translation is "ground berry" so not far off

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonanD89

Would su talamh be correct also?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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Talamh (ground) is one of those rare words in Irish that can be either masculine or feminine. The genitive is either talaimh (m) or talún (f). However, because sú is masculine, the masculine genitive of talamh is used for strawberry: sú talún = berry of (the) ground

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mirokha
Mirokha
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Interesting. The Russian for 'strawberry' is 'земляника' which means 'earth berry'.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/charkersh9

but I thought that su meant juice? And talun meant strawberry so then it would be stawberry juice???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Faranae
Faranae
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This is explained further up, but I shall help: while "su" most often means juice, it's also an older term for "berry". "Talun" means ground or soil, not strawberry. A strawberry is a "ground berry", and Irish tending towards adjectives being after the noun they modify, we get "berry [of the] ground".

2 months ago
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