"Ithimidbágún."

Translation:We eat bacon.

4 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/marvincorea
marvincorea
  • 24
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1284

very important word: bagun

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

bágún* those accent marks are important.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Very true (although there's actually only one needed in bagún). Éire is Ireland, but eire is a burden!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dpjoseph

Bacon is good in any language.

Wij eeten spek. Nós comemos bacon. Nosotros comemos tocino. Wǒmen chī làròu. Ithimid bágún. We eat bacon.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
  • 25
  • 17
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14

It's not good in Hebrew or Arabic!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timomcf
timomcfPlus
  • 20
  • 18
  • 8
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 101

Well, it still tastes good...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dim-ond-dysgwr

And there are not a few Israelis (especially in the north of the country) who will be happy to tell you:

אנחנו אוכלים בייקון.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
ZuMako8_Momo
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10

In Portuguese, we can also say «toucinho» ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rieneke869990

Wij Eten spek/bacon

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rashtrakut
rashtrakut
  • 24
  • 24
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 21
  • 20
  • 20
  • 20
  • 20
  • 19
  • 19
  • 19
  • 18
  • 13
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 1956

This may be the first language lesson to give me bacon

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ainesmomma

..... I dont want to share my bacon....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perrotta2

Ok, I've checked upon this double accent, and everywhere I looked was written "bagún", with one single accent over the "u". So... is there an explanation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/feyMorgaina
feyMorgaina
  • 24
  • 16
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1467

According to Foclóir Scoile, it should be "bagún". The "a" is a short a sound and the "u" is a long u sound. Short vowels do not get an accent mark while long vowels receive an accent mark.

Because the accent mark indicates a long vowel sound, double accents in Irish words shouldn't raise a warning flag. A couple of examples near the entry for "bagún" are "bácús" (bakery) and "báicéir" (baker).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ruamac
ruamac
  • 11
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

The 'accent mark' is called a 'síneadh fada' or simply 'fada'. When spelling a word, for instance 'bagún', you would say, B, A, G, U-fada, N.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gliddon
gliddon
  • 24
  • 5
  • 4
  • 25

Yup. As far as I can tell, Duolingo is wrong.

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/Bagún

It's bagún, not bágún.

The spoken example sounds like bagún rather than bágún.

If I'm wrong, I'd love to be corrected.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasOvaloff
NicholasOvaloff
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 15
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 2

I think the first word is not pronounced the same in the audio.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdanis
jdanis
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 5

Sounds like it says "Is maith leat bágún"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wynnigheard

Agreed.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dpjoseph

Is this how Irish actually sounds? Because the pronunciation seems to be more arbitrary than English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dim-ond-dysgwr

It's actually English spelling that's highly arbitrary. Irish spelling is far more internally consistent and does a much better job of reflecting the sounds of the words -- especially considering the fact that it attempts to cover the pronunciation differences that exist between at least three major dialects.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus
Andrealphus
  • 15
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2
  • 2

So did this come from English, did English pass this on, did the two develop this together, what gives? It is also one of few words I find similar between Welsh and Irish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gruamaire
gruamaire
  • 24
  • 22
  • 15
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 2
  • 2

although many old English words actually come from old Brittonic Celtic languages like old Welsh, this is a different matter. This is known as Béarlachas, made up words by English-speakers trying to learn Irish.

slisíní = rashers/ strips of bacon muiceoil = pork/ pig meat liamhás = ham

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus
Andrealphus
  • 15
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2
  • 2

That makes sense. How often will I run into words like this?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gruamaire
gruamaire
  • 24
  • 22
  • 15
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 2
  • 2

disturbingly often. and I remember being thought them as a kid by incompetent teachers. here's a short list:

pléisiúr, gairdín, bágún, oráiste, tráta, fuisce, síleáil, feirmeoir, póilíní, polasaí, sicín, chistín, hata, veidhlín, lampa, garáiste, damáiste, carr

although these words have been assimilated into the language, as there are far more irish-learners than native speakers, they are still incorrect. for example, sicín should be circeoil, damáiste should be dochar, fuisce should be uisce beatha, carr should be gluaisteán, and oráiste should be flannbhuí.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MustaphaFagg

Thanks, Gruamaire. So the Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla's "ORÁISTE »Dath ~, orange colour." is saying you that you need the "dath" to connote color if using oráiste? And can flannbhui be used alone to mean the color? Does it also mean the fruit?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gruamaire
gruamaire
  • 24
  • 22
  • 15
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 2
  • 2

oráiste = fruit flannbhuí = colour

rua can mean red or orange depending on context

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MuireannMu

Think you're being a bit precious here. There are three distinct foodstuffs that need to be described. Rashers are different to ham, and different to boiled bacon. There's no reason why there can't be three separate words in Irish to describe them, one of which is borrowed from another languages.
Living languages borrow from other languages all the time, dead languages don't. Also your example of flannbhuí below for orange is very "literary". It is a very specific shade of orange, and was probably used for the first time, in the Irish constitution, less than 100 years ago. So that word is a construct. Oráiste (the fruit) and hence oráiste, the colour, have been used a lot longer. Hence the "real" word for orange, as used by actual gaeilgeoirs (Irish speakers) is oráiste. Carr is actually an older word for a wheeled vehicle, it is gluaisteán that is the new word, invented for motor cars. But carr is simpler, and people prefer it. What I'm trying to say is that the language is what people use, not what might have been in the dictionary at a fixed time in the past.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MustaphaFagg

O MuireannMu, English, or any other language, would be in a sorry state if it was only "what people use".
You could throw away 99% or more of the Oxford English Dictionary and most "English speakers" would, sad to say, not be any poorer. But let's not throw it away (despite its died-in-the-wool anti-Irish bias). And let's not confine ourselves to the base, common and popular usage in Irish. You might have to address Dáil Éireann one day, and a Dingle donkey-driver the next (who might reply in Irish that would put a TD to shame).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Well, modern English bacon, Irish bagún (earlier: bacún ), and Welsh bacwn are all descendants of Anglo-Norman bacoun, from Old French bacon -- ultimately a loan-word from Germanic and signifying, of course, "meat from the back and sides of a pig”.

There were Norman lords in Ireland and Wales, as well as in England, so that it's quite natural that Irish- and Welsh-speakers borrowed a fair number of terms from (Norman) French, without any need for these words to have been "filtered" by Saxons.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MustaphaFagg

Foclóir Nua Béarla–Gaeilge shows only bagún (one fada) not bágún. I've never heard it with a long a.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Unsatisfactory

The letter "a" in "bagún" shouldn't have a síneadh fada.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/posthuman01
posthuman01
  • 25
  • 21
  • 19
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

Shire! Bágún!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Burkey0
Burkey0
  • 13
  • 9
  • 6
  • 2

Mixed up sentences

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BreannaKee

Baaccccoooooonnnnn

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crazybonesyo75

How do u learn different languages at one time

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
ZuMako8_Momo
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10

By finding similarities between the languages and using those patterns to remember rules and differences among them

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crazybonesyo75

I mean on duolingo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
ZuMako8_Momo
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10

Oh, lol. If you navigate your cursor onto the flag of the language you are currently learning next to your profile picture at the top right, a small menu will drop down. Click "Add a new course." You will be taken to a page filled with different language courses for English speakers. Just select one and then select "start learning" or something like that; there will be a button on the language page that you click

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crazybonesyo75

thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
ZuMako8_Momo
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10

Tá fáilte romhat.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bailey502273

Can anyone tell me how to pronounce Ithmid? My first language is English and I keep hearing it as ICK-mid.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoanThe3rd

it's just a hard 'h' sound, like in house/hard/however. we just don't usually put them in the middle of words in english. so think "ih-him-id"

2 months ago
Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.