"You are mine until I die."

Translation:Sei mio finché non muoio.

May 24, 2013

248 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BenjaminDi10

Wow! Duo lingo is getting a little creepy, here.

December 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AdventuresAgency

'Getting'? ;)

March 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Langenth

You do want to learn how to say "everything" in Italian, don´t you?

November 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/EinatAdar

And no less important, to understand when it's said to you

February 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/iruts

Agree, thank you.

February 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/tuhnsoo

Epic thread

May 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/uriel715476

Down to the swear words as well bud

May 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MadeByPandas

qualunque cosa

April 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Quattrostelle

It's everyday Italian!

June 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sofie870036

Italian people really say this?

September 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Guiditta3

.

April 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/pierobonal

No, sorry. Just the idiots.

February 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Mordy_005

Nothing creepy about promising to love "unto death do us part". We have been doing it for 1000s of years and will continue to until the end of time.

March 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/farita6

I guess they figure you want to know if someone is saying something creepy to you

October 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Kedeljer

Why is non in the translation? Shouldn't it be "Sei mio finché muoio."?

May 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jmarzw

the duolingo translation for finche is wrong. Finche really means the opposite of until, it means "as long as". So, "sei mio finche non muoio" means "you are mine as long as I don't die". But since in english we don't use "as long as" very much, we prefer to say "you are mine until I die", which basically means the same thing. Hence, the english translation has no negative but the italian version does

June 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/microphone83

I would give you more than +1 for this excellent explanation, it really really helps!

September 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/JWebb68

Agreed! I really struggled to get my head round this. Thanks!

October 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/StacyeL

Me, too!

June 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Haxprocessor

Excellent explanation -- however I don't think duolingo's translation of "finché" is wrong. When you let your cursor hover over the word "until", it says "finché non", letting you know that it is those two things together which mean "until".

January 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Tarabehn

thanks to you both, jmarzw and haxprocessor, for these explanations. i have given a lingot to each of you!

April 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/derkarlotto

that explanation really helps. but when do you use "fino a"?

July 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/alfiethecat

when referring to a place or time

August 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/kvargman

"when I die" is a time. Can I use "fino a muoio"?

December 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/An_dz

You can but then you must use die as a noun and not as a verb.

Sei mio fino alla mia morte

Or less creepy (either one dies):
Sei mio fino alla morte

The last is more like we married so it's until the death of any of us.

September 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

As of this writing, jmarzw's clear, concise explanation has received 901 upvotes. That is by far the most I have ever seen. Well done, jmarzw.

October 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

jmarzw: Grazie. Great explanation!

November 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/KenHutley

Excellent explanation as it had me confused exactly as the questioner states. Thank you!

August 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Judi362744

And we were supposed to know this how?

April 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/FigoDavide

By coming to Duolingo and reading the comments.

August 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Nakatindi

Thanks for this! I often find I learn more in the comments section than in DL itself.

September 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/CalebR12345

C'mon guys! Get him/her to 1 lingot for every day of the year!

May 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/vissicchio

Thanks for the confirmation of --finche--as long as and non finche --as long as I do not die--.

May 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/SarunasP

Italian doesn't refrain from using double negatives, I too wanted to exclude "non", but in my mother tongue it would be just like the Italian, so I went with my gut feeling.

March 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Pedants in English stigmatize it as the "double negative" and falsely try to compare language to math and logic, but in languages that use it, it's called negative concord and it's comparable to noun-adjective agreement for gender, number, case, etc.

But for this sentence in particular, it has nothing to do with negative concord. Italian just frames it a little differently than English does. In English, we say "You are mine until I die", but in Italian they say "You are mine as long as I am not dead".

March 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/pierobonal

It's right (i'm italian). Why duo says "finchè non muoio" ? "Non" is pleonastic but it's used. (the meaning is the same.)

February 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/MelissaM1212

Where is there no definite article before "mio?" Why is it not "il mio" or "la mia."

December 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/aglguy

Because when "mio" is used to mean "Mine" rather than "my", it drops the definte article

November 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Ketutsf

That is not true. It seems that way in certain sentences because the article is (optionally) dropped when "mio" is used as a predicate adjective. That is, in sentences like "Il gatto è mio," which we translate into English as "The cat is mine."

But the truth is really the opposite of what you said. "Il mio" and "mine" are possessive pronouns, and "mio" and "my" are possessive adjectives. The reason "mio" sometimes becomes "mine" in translation is that English does not allow "my" to stand alone as a predicate adjective. We say, "The cat is cute," but we do not say, "The cat is my."

So the idea that "mio" means "mine" is misleading, and will confuse you when translating something like the following:

Giovanni: "Qual è il tuo gatto?" = "Which one is your cat?"

Carmelina: "Il mio è quello intelligente." = "Mine is the smart one."

Giovanni: "No. Quello è mio." = "No. That one is mine."

Notice that Carmelina's "il mio" is a pronoun meaning "mine." But Giovanni's "mio" is an adjective (meaning "my") which becomes the pronoun "mine" in translation because of a peculiarity of English grammar.

March 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

Excellent explanation. But are you sure it's true? Is "mio" in "Quello è mio" really an adjective and not just another form of the pronoun "il mio" being used in a copulative sentence?

March 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Ketutsf

That is a good point. I am sure of the main point of what I wrote above. "Il mio" is the standard form of the pronoun "mine," and "mio" on its own is generally an adjective. You can see this clearly in phrases such as "piacere mio" = "my pleasure" and "casa mia" = "my house." But your interpretation of the use of possessives in copulative sentences sounds very possible to me.

March 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/chindy7

Actually Duo makes clear in the first lesson with possessives that when following the verb "essere", the definite article can be dropped; e.g., "Il gatto è mio." Although your explanation opened up maybe some of the deeper meaning behind why that is.

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Naseem200170

In this sentence, when there is not masculine or feminine noun, how do we know to use mio not mia?

November 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Without any context forcing it one way or another, either is equally accepted.

November 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Miuface

Why is "Sei mio finché non io muoio" incorrect?

July 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AllanM

Non would come between the subject and verb: "Io non muoio".

October 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Luigi.rodino

There is no need for the pronoun "io" because when you conjugate the verb muoio you are conjugating it in the first person so "to die" when you put on the io ending then becomes "I die". Likewise if you were to leave it as muoi it then is in the second person and literally state "you die." If you want to see the rest of the conjugations just look at any verb and hover over it with your cursor then select "conjugate"

January 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Uomo_Siciliano

Morire (To die)

(Io) Muoio (Tu) Muori (Lui/Lei) Moure (Noi) Moriamo (Voi) Morete (Loro) Muorono

Prego.

November 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ShariWard

Lui/lei muore; Voi morite; Loro muoiono -- Grazie :)

July 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DonnaHowell

oh no...now I have 2 conjugations of Morire, yours and Shari's below

August 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

Tony got confused in a couple of cases, or maybe fat-fingered the typing. Shari's conjugations are correct.

August 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Holly682536

Duolingo, my addiction to you is mine until I die.

May 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sallysh2000

why is it "non muoio" instead of just "muoio"? is non muoio not dying?

July 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Ketutsf

"Finche" by itself means "while" or "during the time that." So "Sei mio finché muoio." would mean "You are mine while I die."

"Finche non" means "until." This is consistent with "finche" meaning "while": "You are mine while I do not die." is logically the same as "You are mine until I die."

July 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/SamiaELSharkawy

thank you very much

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexBirdy

Ok duolingo dont get all yandere on me

January 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/a.Zakharov3

Suggested translation - "Tu 6 mio finché non muoio.". Is it a bug?

July 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Yeah, a slight bug. The word "sei" is a homonym. It can mean "(you [singular]) are" or it can mean "six".

August 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MariskaElzinga

Got the same suggestion!

December 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JazzyClazz

Why is 'sei la mia fino a quando muoio' incorrect? why does it have to have 'non' after 'fino a quando'? doesn't this apply only to finché?

August 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DorothyFio

does this mean that the guy is going to live forever ?

October 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ketutsf

No, it means that as long as he doesn't die, the person he is talking to is his. "Finche" = "while." So:

"Sei mio finché non muoio." = "You are mine while I don't die." = "You are mine while I live." = "You are mine until I die."

October 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/christine635651

Ah thank you Ketutsf, now I completely understand

November 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mariuskoc

i do not understand the construction of this sentence

November 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ketutsf

See my answer to DorothyFio just above your comment.

November 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mariuskoc

Grazie, although in truth I'm still confused!!!

November 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ketutsf

Here is another way to think about it:

Suppose that B is not true, and that A is true while B is not true. Then A is true and will continue to be true until B is true. Succinctly, A until B.

Now our Italian sentence says that (A: You are mine) while it is not true that (B: I die). As we have seen, this implies that A until B: You are mine until I die.

November 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/hayhay7789

For me it says "Tu 6 la mia finché non muoio"

September 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

That's a homonym error. The number six is sei in Italian.

September 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

Not "muoia", the subjunctive?

March 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Why would it be?

August 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Kwakwerk

Tu sei la mia finché non io muoio.

This was marked as wrong. Any idea why?

May 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ketutsf

If you want to include all the optional words, it would be "Tu sei la mia finché io non muoio." That still might not be accepted if it hasn't been entered into the database yet.

May 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

"Tu sei la mia finché io non muoio." You switched the word order. What you wrote was roughly the equivalent of saying, "You are mine as long as not I die."

May 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/samlynnw

curious as to the rules for why it isn't "tu sei il mio.." instead of "tu sei mio" is it because tu replaces the il?

November 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Luigi.rodino

"il" is an article. Most of the time you put the article with the noun or word it is modifying. In some cases, however, the article is not necessary.

January 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/chindy7

When following "essere," possessives don't need to have the definite article, like in this question. The only other time you can drop the definite article is when talking about a close family member; e.g., "mio padre," "mio figlio," etc. Hope that clears it up (I know this question was from years ago but hey, maybe you still care :P

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

As the possessive pronoun, it's less a matter of it being optional and more a matter of it meaning something subtly different.

"La gatta è la mia" means "The cat (and not that cat) is mine."

"La gatta è mia" means "The cat is mine (and not his)."

It is mandatory in the subject. Except for singular family members, then it's forbidden.

Mia sorella è ...
Le mie sorelle sono ...

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/rafficonf

"fino alla morte"

January 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/xyphax

I tried 'fino a muoio' and was marked wrong.

January 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/dannygofwts

I don't know when to use é and è, is there any rule??

January 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/s84606
  • 1816

You should use <é> in a few cases: - Compounds of "-che" (perché, benché, finché, poiché....); - Numbers ending by "tre" (three) excluding tre which has no accent (ventitré, trentatré...) - When simple past ends by accented "e" (rifletté), - sé, né.

In all the other cases, use <è>.

January 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

In Italian, if a vowel is accented, the stress (or accent) of the word always falls on the accented vowel. Always. No exceptions. This is probably why so many "-ché" and "-tré" words have accented vowels at the end, as well as e.g. unità "unity" instead of unita "he/she/it unites" or "united [feminine past participle]".

April 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dannygofwts

thank you!

January 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hasanali19

"You are mine until I die" should be translated to "Tu sei mio finché non muoio"

But

"Sei mio finché non muoio" should be translated to "be mine until I die",

Am I right?

Yes, but duolingo says that both has the same meaning!

April 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

No. The second person singular active present imperative of "essere" is "sii", not "sei". So the two mean exactly the same thing.

April 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ForestStreet123

Is there any other way to say this?

June 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/faezeha

What is the difference between "finche non" and "fino a"??

August 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

"Finché" means "as long as", so "finché non muoio" means "as long as I don't die" (i.e. "as long as I live"). "Fino a" means "until". Read through the first few questions and answers here to get a good, quick overview.

August 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sara_soso

why is " tu sei mio finche muoio" incorrect or instead finche 'fino a"

August 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/samsafin42

I just got it wrong with the explanation that the answer is "Tu 6 mio finche non muoio." So that's interesting.

November 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

Someone was being cute using "6" instead of "sei".

November 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/jcook44-u

When did we go over this? At least I haven't gotten this far yet...

February 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul604

If the object of this sentence (the "you") was female, presumably this would be "Sei mia .." then?

April 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

Si.

April 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul604

Grazie :-)

April 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel.Harrison

Corrected me with "tu 6 mio"

September 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Report that as a glitch. "Sei" the verb and "sei" the number are homonyms in Italian.

September 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/VikingBoat

6 mio finché non muoio, o , Io te amo per sempre, these are the 2 options for church weddings, you can always choose the second choice.

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelWat541241

While you are mine, I am in danger of dying ...

January 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/InsWellenk

Am I the only one that gets a "6" in the anwser?

January 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Report that as a glitch. "Sei" the verb and "sei" the number are homonyms in Italian.

January 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/nfantone

"Fino a morire io" should really be accepted. Time of death IS a time.

March 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sandbar_

Weird!! It's not letting me advance with: Tu è mio finché non muoio... It keeps telling me i have to put a 6 instead of è??????

March 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

You don't say tu è; you say tu sei. So you should write, Tu sei mio finché non muoio.

Now, the number six is also pronounced (and spelled) sei, so some Italians (especially younger Italians brought up using cell phones and texting) will substitute the number 6 for the word sei. This is similar to an English speaker writing "Is some1 there?" or "have 2 go now."

March 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/BenMorgan7

Why not "Lei sei mio fina a muoio?" Please help. I am very confused.

April 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

Several problems:

First, you would never say Lei sei. You would say either Tu sei (familiar) or Lei è (polite).

Second, you would not say "fina". You might say "fino a che", which is essentially finché.

Third, as has been explained above, finché does not really mean "until"; rather, it means the opposite, "so long as". So since you want to say "until I die", you would say "so long as I don't die" -- that is, finché non muoio.

Hope that's clearer now.

April 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SamiaELSharkawy

why not sei mio fino muoio?

April 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/allyitaliano

what.... the hell duolingo

April 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TanyaBella76

yes, I echo everybody else... why is 'non' in the sentence?

June 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TolongBerhenti

This question has already been answered several times on this page by jmarzw, ketutsf and others. Please read the comments before you post a question.

June 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Elen294991

what's about "sei mio fino a muoio" - why is it wrong ?

August 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

In English, we say "until X happens." In Italian, they say "as long as X does not happen."

August 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

Two problems:

  1. It's grammatically incorrect to say "fino a muoio". That is simply not how you string words together in Italian.

  2. As Rae.F points out, the Italians don't convey their thoughts as English-speakers do. You don't say "until I die"; rather, you say "as long as I don't die".

August 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/2355lincoln

non puoi finché non finisci la cena

October 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/azita516416

Why can't you put "tu" at the beginning of the sentence?

October 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

You should be able to. What exactly was the text of your answer?

October 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

You can, and it will still be perfectly correct.

October 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/frenchnero

could one use "fino a" to mean until and avoid the problem of non

October 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

"Finché" is "as long as". "Finché non muoio" is literally "as long as I am not dead".

October 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/IanHale0

Ah. Translation looks perverse unless it is rendered "as long as I don't die" or similar which then explains the "non".

November 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kalkehcoisa

I answered "Tu è il mio finché non muoio." and it's complaining that this is the right one: "Tu 6 il mio finché non muoio." ><

January 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

The program occasionally makes homonym errors. sei can be either "you are" or "six".

January 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

Probably this is NOT a programming issue. Rather, when a person hits the "My answer should be accepted" button, his/her answer is send to whoever moderates the language.

If the moderator accepts the answer, I expect there is an Accept this answer from now on button that they press. If whoever petitioned to have his answer included as "right" was too lazy to type out the three whole letters needed to write "tu sei", they might just have shortcutted by typing "tu 6", which in Italian is still pronounced "sei", of course. So when the moderator accepts the translation as valid, it will include this "6" business.

It's also possible that many words are listed with alternate spellings and other homographs, such that "6" is listed as an alternate to "sei". That's another reason the program might accept "6" as a valid answer. That really is not a programmatic issue, either; it's a conscious choice made by the Duolingo people to include homographs of various sorts.

February 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

The problem is that you don't say "tu è", but "tu sei".

January 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/desifromitaly

In this case we'd prefer to use the future: "Sarai mio finché non morirò/morrò" or "sei mio, finché non morirò/morrò".

January 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Empio2

this literally translates " your mine until not die" this doesnt make since

January 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/TolongBerhenti

It translates directly to, "You are mine while I do not die." It is the Italian way of saying, "You are my until I die." See the comments above by jmarzw and ketutsf, where the grammar and logic of the sentence are well explained.

January 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Leonardo705314

I put "Tu sei il mio fino a che non muoio" and got it correct.

January 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Gabriel130812

Muachachachacha!

January 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/pnyF9AMM

Strange! You are mine until I die is translated using a negative, which to me means " You are mine until I do not die". How confusing!!!

January 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

The problem is the English word "until', which means "up to the point in time that". You are mine until I die means "You are mine up to the point in time that I die."

Italian doesn't use this strategy. Rather than using "up to the point in time that XXX happens" (that is, "until XXX happens"), Italian normally uses "so long as XXX doesn't happen." It rephrases the whole thing to a negative instead of a positive. "You are mine until I die" becomes "You are mine so long as I don't die." That's what the Italian phrase means: Sei mio finché non muoio.

January 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/vincemat

Just in time for Valentine's Day, lol

February 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Handrisuselo

"Non" means not; no, so "Sei mio finchè non muoio" should mean "You are mine until I don't die", right?

February 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

As explained in the other comments on this page, the way it is said in Italian is more literally "You are mine as long as I don't die." That is where the "non" comes in.

February 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mariana15denis20

Very strange translation

March 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Do you mean the sentence itself is an odd choice or that you don't know why the Italian has a "non" in it?

For the second option, the answer to that can be found in several comments on this page.

March 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Diane694089

"Tu 6 il mio finché non muoio. " is correct....Tu 6? How can this be correct?

March 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

It's a homonym error. "sei" can mean "you are", but it can also mean "six". This has been addressed on this page before.

March 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ElizSperan

Deus que me dibre, Duo

March 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Penny1945

Why was it incorrect to put "io" before muoio?

March 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

The negation must come immediately before the verb. It's also valid to leave out the "io" entirely, but if you do include it, you need to say "io non muoio".

March 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/aculady

I was really confused about what to write and I got it wrong, but it told me "You used the wrong word" and told me I should have written "Tu 6 il mio finche non muoio" .

April 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

It's a homonym error. "sei" can mean "you are", but it can also mean "six". This has been addressed on this page before.

April 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sicMisfit

Sei mio finché non muoio? Youre mine until I don't die? Or is finché not "until"?

April 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
Mod
  • 2086

It's not: it's rather "as long as". It's been addressed multiple times on this page, but I heard that on some platforms not all comments are currently visible (probably a temporary issue). In fact, an old classic Italian song was titled "Finché la barca va" = "As long as the boat goes".

April 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Peg554937

The translation I was given as correct at the bottom of the page was "Lei è il mio finché non muoio." I would take this to mean "She is mine" rather than "you are mine", but even granting that, I am then confused by "Lei e il mio" rather than "Lui e il mio" or "Lei e la mia".

April 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Lei with a capital L is the formal singular "you", much like "usted" in Spanish. As such, it does not imply the person is female.

April 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

A woman, speaking affectionately but politely to (for example) her male boss: Lei è il mio finché non muoio. That's the only way I can think of that "Lei é il mio" makes any sense.

April 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandra283764

why am I marked wrong for "lo mid" instead of "la mia"?

April 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft
  1. "mid" is not the word you want. You're probably looking for "mio", with an o.

  2. You don't say "lo mio". You say "il mio".

  3. In this case, you don't actually need "il" (or "la"), though it's not wrong.

April 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Lawrence49

Your question has been asked and answered a zillion times on this page already. Please read the other posts before asking a question

May 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JeaniePres

I understand and agree with the Italian but Duoling corrected my verb with the underscored 6. That is weird.

June 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

That's a homonym glitch. "Sei" can mean both "you are" or "six".

June 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mirage472

I can't register a correct answer unless I type "6" instead of e. I have had a problem with this in another question as well. Has anyone encountered this. By the way, the correct answers shows a "6" in place of "e" as well.

July 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

It's not è, it's sei. And "sei" meaning "you are" is a homonym with "sei" meaning "six". Looks like you've got on error triggering a different error.

July 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mirage472

Thanks for your help. Weird quirk. Couldn't figure out why a number kept coming up.

August 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/grovewiley

Came here because I was confused by the "non". I realize this is an old thread, but I have thought about this phrase: it's not unlike the famous wedding vow: "Til Death Do Us Part." It's actually quite romantic in a morbid Italian way! :-)

September 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/KT84222

How do you give lingots to useful comments?

December 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

If you're on the app, I don't think you can. If you're on the website, "Give Lingot" is right next to "Reply".

December 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Viridiana504807

On the app, with the arrows next to a number (which is the number of lingots given). There is an arrow pointing up and an arrow pointing down.

January 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Those are upvote/downvote, not for giving lingots. You certainly can't take away someone's lingots.

January 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Viridiana504807

This should be in a possesive section! XD

January 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandra698114

Stalker alert!

February 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/v-diz

Could you please not use this sentence? Must be something less weird you can use.

February 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mcs12345678910

Creepy

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/marcponzio

Can anyone explain why they don't allow "Sei le mie finche non muio"? Why no "le" in this case?

March 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Lawrence49

Because sei is singular and le mie plural. I suppose you might have siete le mie if it were a menage a trois!

March 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/marcponzio

I appreciate the comment, but I guess what I'm really asking is what about if I were to put "Sei lo mio..." Clearly I messed this one up for a few reasons but my question remains.

March 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

It would be "il mio", not "lo mio", and it's not required here, although it would not be wrong to include it. Someone else addressed this elsewhere on this page.

March 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/marcponzio

Oops. Thanks. And thanks for responding.

March 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/FancyFree73

What's the rule for putting an article before "mio"?

April 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Not just "mio" but all of the possessives:

When it's a possessive adjective, always include the definite article. The only exception is singular unmodified family members: tua sorella

When it's a possessive pronoun, whether you include the definite article or not subtly changes the emphasis.

"Il gatto è il nostro" means "The CAT (and not something else) is ours."
"Il gatto è nostro" means "The cat is OURS (and not someone else's)."

I don't know what the default is, though.

April 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Eeonorka

Why "mia" is non good?

April 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivette58850

is it me or is this phrase a bit strange? Why does Duolingo have to use such a possessive phrase as an example. No one belongs to anyone until they die...

May 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Annie278642

Thank you so much for the help!

June 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/chris634000

Tu 6 mio finché non muoio.

Given as correct answer

What is this about, made me waste a load of time

February 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

It's a glitch, a homonym error. You should file a bug report.

In Italian, "sei" can be either "you are" or "six".

English has a lot of homonyms, too. Like the grizzly bear can't bear it when his hibernation is interrupted. Or Let's park the car and take a walk in the park. Or I didn't lie to you when I said I was going to lie down.

February 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/noam330126

I am not yours Duo

February 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mat965

i got this answer(Tu 6 mia finché non muoio.) WTF?

February 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Please read the other comments on this page and you'll find the answer.

It's a homonym error. "Sei" can be 6 or it can be "you are".

February 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Keith352848

"Sei mio fino a io muoio."... Possibly???

February 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/TolongBerhenti

No. That is not how it is said in Italian. Please read the many comments on this page.

February 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/John955060

????!!!!!! Non Muoio??!! ...... Until I don't die???!!! "Non" does not belong in there!

March 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Please read the rest of the comments on this page. The Italian is literally "You are mine as long as I do not die".

March 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Handrisuselo

"Finché" is really tricky. Watch out!

March 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/virginia529634

Why is it "non". It says until I die and not until I don't die..

May 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

As explained in the other comments on this page, the way it is said in Italian is more literally "You are mine as long as I don't die." That is where the "non" comes in.

May 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/virginia529634

Thanks for explaining

June 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AnthonyDiNome0

why do we need non muoio i this sentence

June 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

It's literally "as long as I don't die".

June 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ellenkeyne

Duolingo informed me that the correct answer was "Tu 6 la mia finché non muoio"!

August 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

As has been discussed on this page several times already, that's a homonym glitch. "Sei" can mean "(you) are" or it can mean "six".

August 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ConnorMurp5

Is this meant to be romantic, or a threat?

January 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Sarah-Chri1

Why 'non muoio' and not 'muoio'

February 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Please read the other comments first.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/428235

February 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mcs12345678910

Could duolingo give an example of scenarios in which new users of Italian would use this phrase? Clearly there must be some cultural aspect that I missed. Or perhaps it is for my protection? If someone said this to me I would be looking for safety very quickly.

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Duolingo is not meant to be a handy phrasebook.

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/VeronicaAkoury

Isn't this translation wrong?

June 15, 2019, 10:45 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

No, it is not. Please read the other comments on this page.

June 15, 2019, 3:36 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/blablalou2

I think the "non" is in plus. "finché" means "until"

January 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/rafficonf

"non" ci vuole. In italiano si dice proprio così: "finché non muoio"

January 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Kjeld-Uwe

I'd like to sum up what i understood so far: If I want to say "you are mine as long as I live" it would be "sei mio finché vivo" (finché = as long as). And if I want to say the same think in a more melodramatic way, I might say: "You are mine until I die" or in Italian "sei mio fino a muoio" (?) or because it sounds even cooler "sei mio finché non muoio" (as long as i don't die)?

February 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/rafficonf

"sei mio fino a muoio" non va bene, non è corretto in italiano.

February 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/xyphax

Is it because 'fino a' is a preposition and 'finché' is a conjunction?

http://translate.google.com/#en/it/until

Thank you for helping me understand.

February 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Kjeld-Uwe

Beh, la non va bene. Grazie mille :)

February 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/VikingBoat

Who will die first?

April 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Masterof117

The non should not be there

May 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Please read the rest of the comments. A more literal translation of the sentence is "You are mine as long as I don't die."

May 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/lfsldkjjkl

Why is it "non muoio" instead of simply "muoio" ?

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TolongBerhenti

Read the comments, starting at the top of the page. Your question has been asked and answered many times already.

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Because it literally means "...while I am not dead." In English we say "until I die", in Italian they say "as long as I'm not dead".

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/lfsldkjjkl

thank ya

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Benajmin11

Why "non"?

October 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TolongBerhenti

Please read the comments before you ask a question. Your question has been asked and answered many times. For example, see the very first question asked on this page.

October 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/serge898631

Why "non"?

August 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Lawrence49

There are a zillion explanations already on this if you took the time to read them before posting.

August 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sofie870036

I only hope this 'you' is a pet or thing, not a person. Isn't everyone supposed to be independent and equal?

September 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Fed588922

This is incorrect. Finché means until. So in this context the sentence is saying " you are mine until I die"

September 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Please read the other comments on this page. Finché is more like "as long as". Finché non muoio is therefore "as long as I don't die".

September 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Solivagance

Why is the "non" required in the sentence?

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Lawrence49

If you had looked at all the comments on this discussion page before putting fingers to keyboard, you would have seen that your question has been asked and answered a zillion times already.

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MoussaBarr1

Why not 'finche muio'?

December 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

Please read the comments here. It has already been discussed multiple times.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/428235

December 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex53251

but would italians in everyday talk use the finche non or would they also leave out the non and just say "finche muoio"? would "finche io muoio" similarly be ok?

April 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

This has been explained on this page before. "Finche" means "as long as". The "non" is required, otherwise you're saying "As long as I am dead" rather than "As long as I am not dead".

April 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex53251

thanks!! it can be confusing when you try to do italian to english but when i use spanish, it makes more sense. in spanish, it would be "mientras" or "despues que" "yo no muera"

April 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/John955060

Another question: don't Italians in everyday speech use expressions for "alive" (e.g. sono vivo), instead of "not dead" - like, do their wanted posters say "Wanted, Dead or Not Dead"? : )

June 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/SamanthaCruz4

This statement is somewhat adorable :3

November 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/John577054

Totally incorrect. "non muoio" would be "I do not die".

February 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
  • 1945

If you read the other comments on this page, you will see that the literal translation of the Italian is "You are mine as long as I do not die". But we don't say "as long as [not]" in English, we say "until I [do]".

The translation is correct.

February 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Solivagance

Why is the "non" required in the sentence?

October 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/FredGassit1

This should be in the flirting lesson

April 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/katstarwolf

Seriously, can someone please explain how the English sentence "You are mine until I die" can be translated into Italian with "Tu sei mio finche NON muoio" I thought NON meant not. In which case this Italian translation would be wrong. One would think, anyway. What am I missing here?

October 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Lawrence49

You are missing that this question has already been asked and answered a zillion times on this page. Have a look at other comments before posting a new one!

October 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MattBurgma

This sentence is stupid and should be removed.

December 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft

This sentence is AWESOME and should be required study for every Duo student of Italian.

January 1, 2018
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