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  5. "You are mine until I die."

"You are mine until I die."

Translation:Sei mio finché non muoio.

May 24, 2013

260 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kedeljer

Why is non in the translation? Shouldn't it be "Sei mio finché muoio."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmarzw

the duolingo translation for finche is wrong. Finche really means the opposite of until, it means "as long as". So, "sei mio finche non muoio" means "you are mine as long as I don't die". But since in english we don't use "as long as" very much, we prefer to say "you are mine until I die", which basically means the same thing. Hence, the english translation has no negative but the italian version does


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haxprocessor

Excellent explanation -- however I don't think duolingo's translation of "finché" is wrong. When you let your cursor hover over the word "until", it says "finché non", letting you know that it is those two things together which mean "until".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/derkarlotto

that explanation really helps. but when do you use "fino a"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alfiethecat

when referring to a place or time


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kvargman

"when I die" is a time. Can I use "fino a muoio"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/An_dz

You can but then you must use die as a noun and not as a verb.

Sei mio fino alla mia morte

Or less creepy (either one dies):
Sei mio fino alla morte

The last is more like we married so it's until the death of any of us.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Curious_Soul

Fino a quando muoio = until(when) i die Finchè muoio = until i die.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gamester2097

Thank you! Finally I got that answered :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seiksirhc

thank you for that clarification, jmarzw!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike703386

Your explanation is OK except on the accusation of Duolingo. Duolingo is write '' You are mine as long as I don't die''. This sentence is grammatically correctly in both Italian and English languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Just because it's grammatically well-formed doesn't mean it's a good translation. We don't say "as long as I don't die" in English, we say "until I die".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarunasP

Italian doesn't refrain from using double negatives, I too wanted to exclude "non", but in my mother tongue it would be just like the Italian, so I went with my gut feeling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Pedants in English stigmatize it as the "double negative" and falsely try to compare language to math and logic, but in languages that use it, it's called negative concord and it's comparable to noun-adjective agreement for gender, number, case, etc.

But for this sentence in particular, it has nothing to do with negative concord. Italian just frames it a little differently than English does. In English, we say "You are mine until I die", but in Italian they say "You are mine as long as I am not dead".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NanetteMen1

This is the best explanation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Puzzle36714

Somewhere, I can't remember, in one of these lesson plans, they explain "finchè non" are usually paired together for "until"

Problem is , like even in the word pairing exercise, they don't do a good job emphasizing this. I do not know why.

So I guess for now just try to remember them as a pair. Together


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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No. And it's not good to force direct equivalencies between words heedless of context in different languages. There is more to different languages than swapping out words.

"Finché" is much closer to "as long as". The phrase is not "finché non" + "muoio", it is "finché" + "non muoio". But we do not say "As long as I do not die"' in English. We translate it more naturally, which is what translation is all about.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pierobonal

It's right (i'm italian). Why duo says "finchè non muoio" ? "Non" is pleonastic but it's used. (the meaning is the same.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelissaM1212

Where is there no definite article before "mio?" Why is it not "il mio" or "la mia."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aglguy

Because when "mio" is used to mean "Mine" rather than "my", it drops the definte article


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ketutsf

That is not true. It seems that way in certain sentences because the article is (optionally) dropped when "mio" is used as a predicate adjective. That is, in sentences like "Il gatto è mio," which we translate into English as "The cat is mine."

But the truth is really the opposite of what you said. "Il mio" and "mine" are possessive pronouns, and "mio" and "my" are possessive adjectives. The reason "mio" sometimes becomes "mine" in translation is that English does not allow "my" to stand alone as a predicate adjective. We say, "The cat is cute," but we do not say, "The cat is my."

So the idea that "mio" means "mine" is misleading, and will confuse you when translating something like the following:

Giovanni: "Qual è il tuo gatto?" = "Which one is your cat?"

Carmelina: "Il mio è quello intelligente." = "Mine is the smart one."

Giovanni: "No. Quello è mio." = "No. That one is mine."

Notice that Carmelina's "il mio" is a pronoun meaning "mine." But Giovanni's "mio" is an adjective (meaning "my") which becomes the pronoun "mine" in translation because of a peculiarity of English grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ste-n-Dee

Excellent explanation. But are you sure it's true? Is "mio" in "Quello è mio" really an adjective and not just another form of the pronoun "il mio" being used in a copulative sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ketutsf

That is a good point. I am sure of the main point of what I wrote above. "Il mio" is the standard form of the pronoun "mine," and "mio" on its own is generally an adjective. You can see this clearly in phrases such as "piacere mio" = "my pleasure" and "casa mia" = "my house." But your interpretation of the use of possessives in copulative sentences sounds very possible to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chindy7

Actually Duo makes clear in the first lesson with possessives that when following the verb "essere", the definite article can be dropped; e.g., "Il gatto è mio." Although your explanation opened up maybe some of the deeper meaning behind why that is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Naseem200170

In this sentence, when there is not masculine or feminine noun, how do we know to use mio not mia?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Without any context forcing it one way or another, either is equally accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom567806

You've got some really in-depth and complicated replies to this question, but there's a simpler answer: It is accepted (29/09/19)

It's not necessary, sure, but if you're like me and appreciate rigidity in your grammar, then you can pop it in


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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No, they are not interchangeable.

"La gatta è la mia" means "The CAT (and not something else) is mine."

"La gatta è mia" means "The cat is MINE (and not someone else's)."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnTorrea

I thought cat was masculine il gatto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"Cat" belongs to the category "people, pets, and common farm animals" and as such, "il gatto" is a male cat and "la gatta" is a female cat.

All other animals that do not belong to that category only have one grammatical gender for the entire species.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnTorrea

Thanks. that clears that up. Pets and farm animals are like people..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Pets and farm animals are like people

Only in the sense that our ancestors knew how to tell the males apart from the females by looking. Wild animals, they never got close enough to be able to make that determination.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miuface

Why is "Sei mio finché non io muoio" incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllanM

Non would come between the subject and verb: "Io non muoio".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luigi.rodino

There is no need for the pronoun "io" because when you conjugate the verb muoio you are conjugating it in the first person so "to die" when you put on the io ending then becomes "I die". Likewise if you were to leave it as muoi it then is in the second person and literally state "you die." If you want to see the rest of the conjugations just look at any verb and hover over it with your cursor then select "conjugate"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bennett270072

Apart from the grammar and all that: does anyone else feel just a bit creeped out when this sentence comes up? I mean, if someone said this to me... I'd run. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kwakwerk

Tu sei la mia finché non io muoio.

This was marked as wrong. Any idea why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ketutsf

If you want to include all the optional words, it would be "Tu sei la mia finché io non muoio." That still might not be accepted if it hasn't been entered into the database yet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ste-n-Dee

"Tu sei la mia finché io non muoio." You switched the word order. What you wrote was roughly the equivalent of saying, "You are mine as long as not I die."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/egregor1

So if finche means 'as long as' that explains the negative in the sentence.....as long as I do NOT die.....rather than until I die. Took a long time but I get it now!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dragavon

Is this not referring to gender? Can you use 'Sei mia finchè non muoio?'. I am marked incorrect but don't understand why, if I'm a woman.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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The grammatical gender of the possessive, just like any other adjective, must agree with the thing possessed (grammatically speaking) and not the owner.

That said, you are right. "You" could refer to someone or something masculine or feminine, and "Sei mia finché non muoio" ought to be just as valid a translation. I don't think your accent mark going in the wrong direction should register as more than a typo, so next time this happens, please click the little flag icon before you move on and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samlynnw

curious as to the rules for why it isn't "tu sei il mio.." instead of "tu sei mio" is it because tu replaces the il?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luigi.rodino

"il" is an article. Most of the time you put the article with the noun or word it is modifying. In some cases, however, the article is not necessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chindy7

When following "essere," possessives don't need to have the definite article, like in this question. The only other time you can drop the definite article is when talking about a close family member; e.g., "mio padre," "mio figlio," etc. Hope that clears it up (I know this question was from years ago but hey, maybe you still care :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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As the possessive pronoun, it's less a matter of it being optional and more a matter of it meaning something subtly different.

"La gatta è la mia" means "The cat (and not that cat) is mine."

"La gatta è mia" means "The cat is mine (and not his)."

It is mandatory in the subject. Except for singular family members, then it's forbidden.

Mia sorella è ...
Le mie sorelle sono ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dannygofwts

I don't know when to use é and è, is there any rule??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s84606

You should use <é> in a few cases: - Compounds of "-che" (perché, benché, finché, poiché....); - Numbers ending by "tre" (three) excluding tre which has no accent (ventitré, trentatré...) - When simple past ends by accented "e" (rifletté), - sé, né.

In all the other cases, use <è>.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ste-n-Dee

In Italian, if a vowel is accented, the stress (or accent) of the word always falls on the accented vowel. Always. No exceptions. This is probably why so many "-ché" and "-tré" words have accented vowels at the end, as well as e.g. unità "unity" instead of unita "he/she/it unites" or "united [feminine past participle]".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/faezeha

What is the difference between "finche non" and "fino a"??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ste-n-Dee

"Finché" means "as long as", so "finché non muoio" means "as long as I don't die" (i.e. "as long as I live"). "Fino a" means "until". Read through the first few questions and answers here to get a good, quick overview.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentPed5

So couldn't you say it another way without the negative and say finché vivo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenMorgan7

Why not "Lei sei mio fina a muoio?" Please help. I am very confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ste-n-Dee

Several problems:

First, you would never say Lei sei. You would say either Tu sei (familiar) or Lei è (polite).

Second, you would not say "fina". You might say "fino a che", which is essentially finché.

Third, as has been explained above, finché does not really mean "until"; rather, it means the opposite, "so long as". So since you want to say "until I die", you would say "so long as I don't die" -- that is, finché non muoio.

Hope that's clearer now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elen294991

what's about "sei mio fino a muoio" - why is it wrong ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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In English, we say "until X happens." In Italian, they say "as long as X does not happen."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ste-n-Dee

Two problems:

  1. It's grammatically incorrect to say "fino a muoio". That is simply not how you string words together in Italian.

  2. As Rae.F points out, the Italians don't convey their thoughts as English-speakers do. You don't say "until I die"; rather, you say "as long as I don't die".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frenchnero

could one use "fino a" to mean until and avoid the problem of non


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"Finché" is "as long as". "Finché non muoio" is literally "as long as I am not dead".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sicMisfit

Sei mio finché non muoio? Youre mine until I don't die? Or is finché not "until"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
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  • 2661

It's not: it's rather "as long as". It's been addressed multiple times on this page, but I heard that on some platforms not all comments are currently visible (probably a temporary issue). In fact, an old classic Italian song was titled "Finché la barca va" = "As long as the boat goes".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandra283764

why am I marked wrong for "lo mid" instead of "la mia"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ste-n-Dee
  1. "mid" is not the word you want. You're probably looking for "mio", with an o.

  2. You don't say "lo mio". You say "il mio".

  3. In this case, you don't actually need "il" (or "la"), though it's not wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FancyFree73

What's the rule for putting an article before "mio"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Not just "mio" but all of the possessives:

When it's a possessive adjective, always include the definite article. The only exception is singular unmodified family members: tua sorella

When it's a possessive pronoun, whether you include the definite article or not subtly changes the emphasis.

"Il gatto è il nostro" means "The CAT (and not something else) is ours."
"Il gatto è nostro" means "The cat is OURS (and not someone else's)."

I don't know what the default is, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edwina1023

okay I understand why finché non is used here but can someone please explain the difference between "finché non" and "fino a" and when each one should be used? Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Think of "finché" as "as long as [verb]" and "fino a" as "until [noun]". If the "a" in "fino a" is a preposition, it can only be followed by a noun phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/savagecheetah

There are more than one conjuction to say different things. I confused sia with finche


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"Sia" is a verb, the subjunctive form of "essere".

"Finche" is the conjunction "as long as".

"E" is the conjunction "and".

"Ma" is the conjunction "but/however".

"O" is the conjunction "or".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/speaktorob

Is it also valid to say, "Sei mio finché vivo" to mean the same thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Victoria879848

Does it HAVE to be muoio? Why not cessano?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"Cessare" is simply "to stop" and "cessano" is "they stop".
"Morire" means "to die" and "muoio" is "I die".

https://www.italian-verbs.com/italian-verbs/conjugation.php?parola=cessare
https://www.italian-verbs.com/italian-verbs/conjugation.php?parola=morire


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jobie4

You are mine as long as I don't die :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thi-fcr

If I would translate from English to Italian, saying "As long as LIVE you are mine", how would it be word by word in italian and how would that sound like?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thi-fcr

Would that sound natural if I said "finché vivo tu sei mia"? (I'm not referring to the translation itself, I just wanna if that would be natural and more accurate.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marianne5759

Why is there a NON????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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This is answered in the top thread on this page.

English says "until X happens".
Italian says "as long as X does not happen."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SachiyoDal

Is adding 'io' before muoio incorrect? It was marked wrong for me.

Phrase: "sei mio finché non io muoio"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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You can't have the "io" between the "non" and the "muoio". It's always "io non muoio" and never "non io muoio".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PattQuattr

I wrote " tu sei mio finche non io muoio. I know now that tu and io are redundant but dont think its wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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You can't put the subject pronoun between the adverb and the verb. Finche io non muoio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Handrisuselo

"Finché" is really tricky. Watch out!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Camelot58

Strange.... until I die: finché non muoio? Why 'non' and not just finché muoio?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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This is answered in the top comment thread on this page.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianVeidt33

Nothing personal... But I don't find any logic here...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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I'm going to guess you don't understand why there's a "non". Can you read the other comments where it's explained? In English, it's "until I do". In Italian, it's "as long as I don't". Makes perfect sense, it's just a different way to frame it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnTorrea

It should say, "Sono tuo fino alla morte."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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No, that would be "I am yours until death." Not the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnTorrea

I know. I just don't believe any Italian I know would say "You are mine until I die," implying that he owns her and when he dies someone else can own her..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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They also don't run around saying "The bee is in the sugar" or "The monkey reads a book."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aidian5

Love this! So true though. I have never written in sugar. You are more likely to say "You are mine until I die" than, "I write in the sugar."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Duolingo was never meant to be a handy phrasebook. It teaches grammar and vocabulary. The unusual sentences are a long-standing staple of language education because it makes things more memorable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blablalou2

I think the "non" is in plus. "finché" means "until"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rafficonf

"non" ci vuole. In italiano si dice proprio così: "finché non muoio"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kjeld-Uwe

I'd like to sum up what i understood so far: If I want to say "you are mine as long as I live" it would be "sei mio finché vivo" (finché = as long as). And if I want to say the same think in a more melodramatic way, I might say: "You are mine until I die" or in Italian "sei mio fino a muoio" (?) or because it sounds even cooler "sei mio finché non muoio" (as long as i don't die)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rafficonf

"sei mio fino a muoio" non va bene, non è corretto in italiano.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xyphax

Is it because 'fino a' is a preposition and 'finché' is a conjunction?

http://translate.google.com/#en/it/until

Thank you for helping me understand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kjeld-Uwe

Beh, la non va bene. Grazie mille :)

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