"The boy eats vegetables."

Translation:Itheann an buachaill glasraí.

4 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/brentv

Why is 'an buachaill' correct but 'na buachaill' incorrect? Is 'na' only for plural and 'an' for singular?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tehrm
Tehrm
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correct. The definite article changes to match singular and plural.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brentv

Okay, thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/knittingarch

So, I wrote "itheann glasrai an buachaill" and I got it wrong. How important is word order? Would a speaker really have no idea what I was saying to them with this syntax? Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NiallT
NiallT
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I think a native speaker would understand your intended meaning as well as an English speaker would understand if you said "the boy vegetables eat" because there's only one sensible interpretations. But that doesn't mean your answer isn't wrong: you said "vegetables eat the boy". Word order is pretty rigid.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/knittingarch

Hahaha! Those are some dangerous vegetables! Thanks for the reply. I will make sure to pay attention to word order from now on :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Word order is VSO. This sentence literally word for word is "Eats the boy vegetables"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brigids.em
brigids.em
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Sorry to have jumped in -- I didn't see your excellent explanation!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brigids.em
brigids.em
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If I've understood the Tips and Notes on word order correctly, Irish generally follows the order 'Verb - Subject (does the verb) - Object (has the verb done to it, in this sentence). So "Itheann glasraí an buachaill" would mean "Vegetables eat the boy!" (Mind you, I wouldn't put it past some of the Brussels sprouts we get here to try!) :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tehrm
Tehrm
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Is case determined by location in the sentence? Is 'buachaill' the subject because it immediately follows the verb?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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I'm not exactly sure what you're asking, but I think yes.

Irish uses "Verb-Subject-Object". So the English "the boy (subject) eats (verb) veg (object)" goes to faux English "eats (verb) the boy (subject) veg (object)" or in Irish "itheann (verb) an buachaill (subject) glasraí (object)".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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Not exactly. The subject is buachaill because the boy is DOING the verb--he's eating. Buachaill is after the verb because Irish follows the sentence pattern Verb-Subject-Object in most statements. Drinks cat milk. Eats dog meat. Read I newspaper.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NiallT
NiallT
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Subject and object aren't technically "case". Case in the literature refers to different inflected forms, and the subject and object in Irish are therefore the same case. Irish ha

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NiallT
NiallT
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Of course I'm forgetting that like in English, Irish pronouns DO have a distinction between nominative and accusative case. But normal nouns don't.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brigids.em
brigids.em
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But it's only the subject and direct object forms that are the same case, right? Or am I mis-remembering that Irish has a dative case for indirect objects that we'll learn later?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NiallT
NiallT
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Yes, Irish has a prepositional case (aka "dative"), and also a genitive case (two nouns together, like in English "bread knife" or "biscuit tin").

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew_Daley

I had eclipsed boy (mbuachaill) and it said it was a typo. I thought in this instance boy should be eclipsed, am I wrong in this instance for some reason?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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I think I see the problem: there are two common words spelt the same way: an

One of them is used to form questions in the present tense, and it eclipses the beginning of the following verb: an n-ithann tú, an dtuigeann tú, ...

The other is the definite article (the), and sometimes causes lenition, sometimes eclipsis, sometimes nothing. For the subject of the verb (like here), an lenites feminine nouns (an bhean) and adds a t- to masculine nouns that start with vowels (an t-úll). Since buachaill isn't feminine and doesn't start with a vowel, you should have just left it alone.

The preposition + definite article + noun construction is a whole different thing! If you want to say with the boy, you would say either leis an mbuachaill or leis an bhuachaill, depending on where you learnt your Irish. You can look up all the prepositions and see what they do to following nouns here

I hope that helps.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Which one does duo teach

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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You need both of them. * An mbeidh an buachaill ansin? Will the boy be there? The first an (the one that forms the question) eclipses beidh (will be) and the second an (the) does nothing to buachaill*.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NiallT
NiallT
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Both.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zimnx

I seem to remember being taught the word for "boy" was "Gasúr". Is this wrong, or is it just a dialectal difference?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
Mod
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Gasúr is perfectly valid! It is another dialectal variant for "boy".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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AFAIK, gasúr should be okay. I have a feeling that it might be a younger boy, but I'm not sure. Oops! Someone more knowledgeable did post, right while I was posting!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zimnx

Go raibh mile maith agaibh!

3 years ago
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