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  5. "Is buachaill mé."

"Is buachaill mé."

Translation:I am a boy.

August 26, 2014

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caity-Cat

Does Irish not actually use a word for "a" and it's just meant to be assumed? This directly translates from the tooltips as "I am boy," but it's marked wrong and the answer is "I am a boy". Just wondering.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Merriam-Webster

As said in the footnotes for this chapter, Irish has no indefinite article. It's kind of like Japanese in that sense: buachaill means either "boy" or "a boy", depending on the context of its sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flint72

And Russian too has no indefinite article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hedgehog69

I think all slavic languages do not have it (because it's useless) :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

You can't say indefinite articles are useless. Some languages have a indefinite and not a definite. So, which one is useless?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom418584

With that considered, you really only need to know which the language does or doesn't have, with the context being whether or not it has it in a sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JirkaKrato4

Well, Czech language doesn't have any articles. So from that point of view, both of them are :-D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wesley630988

It's the same in Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaelicMarauder

Or definite articles...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G0108

Esperanto also does not have indefinite articles.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nkwk88

Thank you! I always get this wrong until I realise there is no specific article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CamilaTisi

And i'm here searching what "indefinite" is because I don't Speak English but is the only lenguaje I find to learn Irish :'v


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fionnuala434620

Why does mine say: i am a chap?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Idraote

Can someone tell me how to pronounce "mé"? Sometimes I hear something like English "me" (that is 'mee') other times I hear something like English "may"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

It’s closer to English “may” (or better, Spanish me) than to English “me”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0-3
  • 2264

I: Is BU the boy ACH-ING? Is he AH... ILL?

II: Itheann an buachaill arán


ETYMOLOGY

Nominative: buachaill buachaillí

Vocative: a bhuachaill a bhuachaillí

Genitive: buachalla buachaillí

Dative: buachaill buachaillí

: IS BU HUL MAY


Is bu ach a ill mé

RIGHT SIDED ACCENTS: are equivalent to the SPANISH KEYBOARD

Á É Í Ó Ú


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/William740518

What is the difference between "tá" and "is"? I know you can use "is" like this: Is buachaill mé. But "tá" also means "is" (of some kind) in English. Can you say: "táim buachaill"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

If you’ve studied Spanish (or Portuguese), the difference between ser and estar is similar to the difference between is and in Irish. ( is a conjugation of .) Táim buachaill isn’t said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LittleKitt156156

Tá is present tense for is and táim is tá and mé put together so yes u can say taim


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1560

You cannot say *táim buachaill".

You can say táim (adjective), you can't say táim (noun).

táim déanach - "I'm late" - OK
táim fuar - "I'm cold" - OK
táim fear - not OK.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelleSize

How different is this from Gaelic in Scotland? Anyone know. I know they say similar, but how similar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexander_Agruso

Is there grammatical gender in Irish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexinIreland

Yes, nouns are either masculine or feminine, and the way initial mutations, cases and adjectives behave changes accordingly. In terms of pronouns, there are two gendered pronouns: sé (he or it, when referring to masculine nouns, or to an unspecified "it") and sí (she or it, when referring to feminine nouns).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carrotcart2

Are there any patterns in gender in Irish like there are in other languages like Spanish, or do you just have to memorize which gender goes to which noun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Some rules of thumb are given in the Acme™ declension guesser, but it’s not always accurate, so it’s best to memorize a noun’s gender.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carrotcart2

That's what I was afraid of but thank you for the link and clarification


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

When you are a beginner, learning the word with the article doesn't require more effort that learning the word alone. I agree, it's like French or German. Pattern are more obvious in Spanish than in French or German, so this method is the best in my opinion. And you deduce some pattern afterwards, when they exist (not always the case in these languages)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rdmthws

Can someone explain this to me? I scroll my mouse over the words, "Is" translates to "I am" while "me" also translates to "I am". What is really the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

The verb comes first in Irish so "Is" which can also be "is" or "are" is "am" in this sentence. "mé" is the word for "I".

Scroll down here for the Tips and notes: https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ga/Basics-1


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

If you look carefully, the first dictionary hint that’s shown for both is and is “I … am”; it shows that the separated words is … mé are translated as the non-separated phrase “I am”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TCF_of_HCI

What is a good way to familiarise oneself with Irish orthography? Go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The Wikipedia article on Irish orthography would be a good way to acquire familiarity with it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMEND1

What is 'to be' in Irish. (Infinitive, not conjugated)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

There are no infinitives in Irish. The bare form of the verb to be (which is also the imperative) is 'bí'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelikaku

"I am boy." rejected.

בס״ד


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1560

Is buachaill mé doesn't mean "I am boy".

At a guess, you're trying to use "boy" as an adjective, in which case you wouldn't use the copula in Irish, but it's not really a natural sentence in English anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skdnv

It sounds to me like this phrase is pronounced like a question (because of the intonation). Is this the correct way to say it, or is it one of Duo's "glitches"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1560

It's not a glitch, it's just the way the voice actor read the script (unlike most other languages on Duolingo, the Irish course doesn't use a text-to-speech engine, all of the spoken Irish sentences on Duolingo are actual recordings). It doesn't sound like an interrogative intonation to me, though she does put some emphasis on that wouldn't always be there.

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