"Táim go maith, go raibh maith agat."

Translation:I am well, thank you.

4 years ago

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Erchenswine
Erchenswine
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Why can't I say 'thanks'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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Because you didn't translate the "táim go maith" part.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/terencecla4
terencecla4Plus
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I presume go raibh maith agat can be broken down in a literal sense. And it looks like it ends with "you are well", but I can't work out "raibh". And I may certainly be wrong entirely. Could someone clarify?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
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It's a phrase in what is known as the "subjunctive mood", which you use to express the idea that you wish something would happen. It literally means "[I wish] that there were goodness at you."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/craaash80
craaash80
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I really need these explanations. Irish is the only language in which etymology hasn't helped me so far...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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I suppose semi-litearlly it means "good on you" or "that good was on you".

Sometimes it is hard to literally translate very common phrases like this in a literal way which is still meaningful and that makes sense in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/terencecla4
terencecla4Plus
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Understood, but I find the literal translation sometimes offers insight into the structure of a language. Sometimes not, particularly with idioms.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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Ah yes, I agree. Rather, that was a disclaimer to say that I'm not able to exactly translate it for you, so it is possible that someone else would translate it a slightly different way. I apologise if I seemed rather curt!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/terencecla4
terencecla4Plus
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Not at all! It was quite helpful.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardMik2

what purpose does the "go" serve? why can't i simply say "táim maith" or "is maith mé"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
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Thank you translates into Irish as go raibh maith agat (if speaking to one person) or go raibh maith agaibh (if speaking to more than one person). This is an example of the subjunctive mood, n complex area of grammar which it would be better not to get stuck into at this stage of the course; just learn the phrase off for now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/czczczczcz
czczczczcz
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>Begins ranting about semi-colons.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ismisepaul

I would of used "tá mé" in this case. When should táim be used?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
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They mean the exact same thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alibax
alibax
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*would have used...

let's not confuse any non -native English speakers

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/czczczczcz
czczczczcz
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I believe they're interchangeable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kbogovic
kbogovic
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I will never be able to say it out loud. So complicated!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattyG7

I would like to say that "I'm doing well" should be an acceptable translation of "Taim go mhaith". I would personally be unlikely to say "I am well" in English. It sounds stilted and unnatural.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CappyMcBrit

I say that often when someone asks how i am. Seems fine to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattyG7

But certainly both should be acceptable?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CappyMcBrit

Agreed, definitely.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irisflower2

Why do you have to say 'go raibh maith agat' if each word is thank you cant you just say 'agat' ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lolbrainco

If you said agat, you'd just be saying, "at you". The whole phrase expresses goodness toward someone, so the whole thing is needed. It only means thank you in English because that's the closest translation to the expression.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Delerat

I believe you were reading Duolingo's break down incorrectly. In the pop up, the top part is the grouping of words you're hovering over, the second line is what they mean together, and the lines below that show the meaning of the specific word you're hovering over, shown by it's position within those horizontal breaks.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay974581

I think people are getting lost in trying to do a 1 for 1 translation of ever word. Irish is poetic and full of metaphors. Remember the language developed in a culture where poets were the highest and most revered cast in society and that is reflected in the language today.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZoranMudronja
ZoranMudronja
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Geez, Louise, I need a drink!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/otsogutxi
otsogutxi
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Irish is way more confusing than Norwegian or German. I like that. So much irregularities....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oblivionme
Oblivionme
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Very complicated :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConanMullan

What exactly does 'go' mean here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The go in go maith is a particle without an independent meaning (akin to “to” in English infinitives); the go in go raibh means “that” (as a conjunction).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nkwk88
nkwk88
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It actually translate into "I'm well, may the goodness be at you" correct? How weird.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tom665063

Dhean me dearmad

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tom665063

Dhean me botun

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tom665063

There are even more irregularites than english

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tom665063

Ta me go maith

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tom665063

Yes,even more difficult than german

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chalazon

May there be good to you.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatherineK109954

I feel that the "go raibh maith" part of the sentence is not pronounced. Am I the only one who thinks this?

2 weeks ago
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