"Tá mé go maith."

Translation:I am well.

4 years ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/magnetholik

It would be great to have a recording of this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Wait until you see what I found! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRXFEAmjd_M

He is not at this lesson yet though.

Try entering this phrase here: http://www.abair.tcd.ie/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageEden
LanguageEden
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You basically saved me for this course! Thanks for the link!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivy1239
Ivy1239
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Thank you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tlequiyahuitl

It's like "taw may guh MAH" if that's any help :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chevko

Thank you! I wasnt sure if iwas just hearing things

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GertWall
GertWall
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Why doesn't the sentence read Taim go math

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
Mod
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Both Tá mé and Táim are acceptable in standard Irish, the meaning is the same.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hamshishdoeyti
hamshishdoeyti
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What does "go maith" translate literally as?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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Maith = "good". Adding go in front makes it into the equivalent adverb: go maith = "well". (That's a simplification, but it might help to understand this sentence)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Codester3

Is that the reason that road signs say “go mall” when you’re approaching a tight curve (or other reasons to slow down)?

In the US, our equivalent sign would say “slow”. The Irish sign puts the “go” in front to make “slow” into “slowly”?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Feidhl.im

This should really include "I am grand" the most irish phrase I could think of.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Conchuir

It's now accepting 'I'm grand', which is what I'd say naturally in conversation. Nice one.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/knittingarch

So would the literal translation be something like "there is goodness at me"? Trying to understand how the multi-word sentences are being built. Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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No, it just means "I am well": word by word it's "is I well" (taking go maith together to mean "well").

The "there is X at me" construction (tá X agam) is the Irish way of saying "I have X", and should always be translated as "I have X".

(I suppose that "there is goodness at me" would be the literal translation of "tá maith agam" ("I have goodness"), but I doubt anyone says that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindsay825464

This is helpful, thanks. But if this is (ta X agam) construction, why isn't it written as "Ta go maith me"?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
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Irish is primarily a VSO (verb-subject-object) language. In the tá X agam construction, 'X', the possessee, is the subject (e.g., Tá hata agam = lit., 'A hat is at me' = 'I have a hat'). 'A hat' is the subject of that sentence. That is why the sentence here is Tá mé go maith, because the subject (mé) is in the second position.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakeRyan967423

It would be " there is goodness to me"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/razlem
razlem
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Would "I am doing well" work?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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Yes, it should. You should report it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LangForThought
LangForThought
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Why is there hardly ever audio for the Irish course? It would be extremely helpful and appreciated!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4279133 Important info about Irish course (audio)

Try entering this phrase here: http://www.abair.tcd.ie/

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4277962 Irish Portal

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bouleversant
bouleversant
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I'm an Italian mother tongue speaker and this is my first attempt to learn irish. I must say it is unbelievably difficult to me in syntax and pronunciation

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ladron
Ladron
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I also have extreme problems with the pronunciation and spellings. The syntax is very different to Germanic and Romance languages, but does not seem as complicated/conflicting to me as the sound and spelling. Judging from the comments I read, it seems most on this course learnt Irish early in life naturally and are here to brush up on it. So the approach to explaining things is sometimes overly complex because they are approaching it as lapsed native speakers and/or as professional linguists. I started because I was curious so I will continue as long as I still am.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PauBofill
PauBofill
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What's the literal translation of go maith?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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"maith" is an adjective that means "good" and "go maith" is an expression that turns it into the adverb "well". "go" kind of reminds me of the ending we tack onto adjectives to turn them into adverbs "-ly" (except that it is put before the adjective), but by itself it is the preposition "until"and it is used with verbs ("go" comes after the verb) and other words to change their meanings; so, it is a bit hard to pin down. You really must learn each expression as an entity. http://www.irishdictionary.ie/dictionary?language=irish=english=go http://www.irishdictionary.ie/dictionary?language=irish=english=mor mór http://www.irishdictionary.ie/dictionary?language=irish=english=mall

(I suppose you could think of it as "you are good until something changes" Rather than be an innate characteristic - it has become something you feel at this time? so it becomes "well" No, that won't work with the next adjective that is turned into an adverb..) "mór" is "great, large" and "go mór" is "considerably"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PauBofill
PauBofill
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thanks man. And btw is there a language that you aren't learning? XD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Well, there are a lot of languages that I am not learning yet. You know I won't be able to learn every language out there, but I am getting really good at finding resources to help me along and Irish is surely one of my favorite more difficult challenges.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PauBofill
PauBofill
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Yeah, I know, well good luck.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tieeemen

This is really the same as the Scottish Gaelic phrase: 'Tha (mi) gu math!' which means the same

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hectorlqr
hectorlqr
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Is 'th' in irish just pronounced /h/?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PEM122333
PEM122333
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Yes, identically to an English 'h' (hat, hike)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ameliacullen
ameliacullen
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I'm confused, why in the I form of to be does the verb and the pronoun just swap round, but in other forms the pronoun goes to the end of the phrase???

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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http://www.irishgaelictranslator.com/articles/grammar/ta-and-is-the-to-be-verbs/

At least the verb goes first in both versions. Strange for the verb to be first to English speakers but at least that is consistent.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The-Tank
The-Tank
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ten languages, you profile is like a hotel with those flags :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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In a copula[^footnote], the pronoun goes to the end, even with the ‘I’ form (‘I am a man.’ = ‘Is fear me.’). But this is not a copula, so the pronoun won't go to the end in any form. (At least, that's how I read the explanation in the notes!)

[^footnote]: X is Y, where X and Y are both nouns; but here Y is an adjective (or an adverb or whatever it is).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NotsoFamiliar

My understanding as a layman to linguistics is that that "Ta" translates literally to have, but much in the way "have" has two meanings in English, "Ta" is also meant to serve as an equivalent to the linking verb "am" Is that correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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Not exactly. means only "is" (and "am" and "are"). It is used in the Irish way of saying "I have", but to have that meaning it must be combined with a personal preposition like agam (literally "at me").

So: Tá X agam (literally "X is at me") = "I have X" But: Tá mé sásta = I am happy.

is used for saying "I am <ADJECTIVE>". If you want to say "I am <NOUN>", you need the copula is, which imposes a completely different sentence structure:

Is fear mé: "I'm a man" Is bean í: "she's a woman".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alkeys87

So would the difference between tá mé / táim esentially be I am / I'm ? Also, I think someone may have asked this already but if go and maith both mean good, why do we need both?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
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Táim isn't technically a contraction like "I'm", but the synthetic form of tá mé -- basically, use either one, because they are both correct. Go doesn't mean anything here -- it's the adverbial particle that turns the adjective maith (good) into an adverb (well).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schlaager_head

If you want to hear it, use the blue speaker button at the top of this comments page.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PEM122333
PEM122333
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So the audio pronounces maith as 'ma.' I was taught that the pronunciation was 'moi' (as in the 'oi' in 'oil' or the 'oy' in 'boy'). I assume this is to do with dialect?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cathnog
cathnog
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your oi pronunciation is the ulster dialect. the version taught here is the connacht dialect

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
nahuatl1939
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Ha ! i thought I was beginning to understand the verbs. BUT !! Taim is I AM , no ? so why is it TA ME here ? or am I missing something ? or is it that TAIM is only when you conjugate the verb and when it has a complement it becomes TA ME ? thanks for you help. I like this language and I hope it will not disappear like so many others . Rumansh ( Rheto Roman of my country , Switzerland) for instance. Ni Tudaish ni Taliens, Rumansh vulaint restar. It is our fourth National and Official language but it represents less than 1% of the total population of the country

1 year ago
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