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"Táim."

Translation:I am.

3 years ago

96 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TempusFugit

This may be a silly question, but I'm wondering what the difference is between 'Táim' meaning I am, and 'Is ... mé' also meaning I am. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VarneyGary

I see you're studying Spanish. The difference is akin to ser vs. estar. Generally, "ta" is used to describe something that's changeable ("I am happy"), and "is" is used as a copula to tell what something IS ("I am a teacher").

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G0108

Thank you, we also have the ser and estar thing in Portuguese (my native language) so this helps.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TempusFugit

Thank you! That should help me avoid lots of confusion later on.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

This made it WAYYY easier!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hsan50

Great explanation!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Didi106358

yep

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/biancaquir1

I got it right good luck

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zinthak

Why isn't táim spaced like tá sé and tá sí? Is it because tá mé exists anyway?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oppikoppi
oppikoppi
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contraction

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Galeyvsgv
Galeyvsgv
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It's kind of a contraction but not really. It is like most Indo-European languages there are personal forms of verbs. There were also for the other persons but in modern Irish only the 1st person singular and 1st person plural retain the personal forms, in which case no pronoun is needed. These were replaced by the forms endin in -ann -eann -ionn etc for the other personson on verbs other than ta/is (bheith) This is not possible in English because, even if we maintained the 'thou' form, all the plural forms are the same: am, art, is, are are are. If we say the first three without pronoun we know clearly what person (at least number-wise) the verb refers to. another example is to have (Old-English infinitive = habban): have, hast, hath/has, have, have, have) German conjugation of 'haben': habe, hast, hatt, haben, hat, haben. Here we see that the English lost endings in the plural: ic hæbbe þū hafas/hafast/hæfst, he/heo/hit hafaþ/hæfþ, we habbaþm. ge habbaþ, hio habbaþ (þ = th which corresponds to the t at the end of the other Germanic and Romance languages). And we see even then the plurals are the same in the Old English period. if there ever were different forms for the plurals it had to be during the archaic period

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danieldrd

Because it's present tense and you're talking about yourself.

Instead of saying 'Tá mé' we just shorten it to 'Táim'

:D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMurray29
JasonMurray29
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I am Irish, the rest are correct, it is a contraction, however, you should not have to use it, in Donegal we always say 'Tá mé'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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JasonMurra12, you will find that many Donegal forms are not accepted by Duolingo. Just keep reporting them.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMurray29
JasonMurray29
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Yes, I will do that, thanks

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stacey773203

Thank you. I used to understand the Donegal dialect and wonder if this Irish is really just school Irish and not the Irish that people really speak. What dialect ARE we learning then?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wengusflengus
Wengusflengus
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In present tense, the first person singular and plural of verbs take a different form

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nkwk88
nkwk88
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Something like I'm instead of I am.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bush6984
Bush6984
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I wish there were a way to get the slowed down recordings, like the other language courses offer. This recording is too fast for me to process and think of as a new learner. :-/ I like the fast option, slow option in other courses.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jack40822

That might be for the best. At the moment the recordings are fairly inaccurate compared to the other courses, so take them with a large pinch of salt.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

Err... this is an odd question... but what exactly does that idiom mean? Many other people use it, and I still don't know what it means.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeredithNa
MeredithNa
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It means to not trust it completely. For example, "George is a used car salesman. He's a good guy but take whatever he says with a pinch of salt."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gerritboehringer

it is kind of like a figure of speech like I could eat a horse

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Richard367480

This is way better than google translate. Goolgle translate makes it sound like the word, like i typed in hi for irsh, and it said hoi. Google translate is a rip off

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

Search up "hello through google translate" or any other song you like. Haha, they are so funny.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caity-Cat

Anyone else find this to be pronounced badly or am I missing something? Google searches pull up that it's supposed to be pronounced with a "T" sound at the start, and this sounds distinctly like a C sound to me. I'd like to figure out which is the right way so if anyone with experience in this language knows, please let me know.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jabramsohn
jabramsohn
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It sounds like a very clear, even aspirated /t/ sound, to me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Synesthete24

I agree, jabramsohn, but I think something that makes this hard is that it is Irish. Similar to French in the sense that it doesn't always seem to be spelled the way it sounds.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caity-Cat

Hm, I wonder if my speakers aren't giving me the full sound then.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeClubac
DeClubac
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sounded like "k" to me

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stacey773203

Me too.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wengusflengus
Wengusflengus
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the 't' is slightly dental

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenEamonn

Sounds a bit like a "th" to me but it didn't give me any confusion.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stacey773203

It confused me terribly. When I heard it I thought it was a new word and thought it sounded like Cohen. Frustrating. And I'll never use it since I only want to speak in Donegal. They also never ever say Dia duit. Does anyone really say that? Native speakers?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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People everywhere say that, but it's not as common in the north. If you are interested in an excellent, professionally made course in Ulster (Donegal) Irish, use Now You're Talking instead of Duolingo. Since it was produced over 20 years ago, there is no phone app, just videos, sound files, and 'workbook' pages you can print out. The hairdos and clothes in the videos are very 90's, but there are NO errors (a problem with Duolingo) and there is lots of audio, all recorded by native speakers. It's all at www.ultach.com, and it's free.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vmccoy12

It's pronounced similarly to how "thaw" is pronounced English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/transcend77

you mean the long "a" sound, so it (the first syllable) rhymes with "thaw"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vmccoy12

yes, the "th" sound is very faint, though. You mostly hear the "t".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jack40822

Really there shouldn't be any "th" sound, just "t". Say it like "taw", the word aw or awe but with a t sound preceding it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maryfrangipane

Isen't 'taim' the same as 'ta me'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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Yes--it's a dialect thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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Well, both forms are understood everywhere.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skdnv

How do you transcribe phonetically "táim"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AGreatUserName
AGreatUserName
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According to Wiktionary, [t̪ˠɑːmʲ]. So, that's a velarised dental t, a long "a" towards the back of the mouth and then a palatalised m.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

Umm, sorry for asking, but what exactly does that mean? I'm in sixth grade, so my vocabulary isn't as large

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wengusflengus
Wengusflengus
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it's ok, it's unknown business to most people :P

The velum is the soft part at the far back of the roof of your mouth, so a velar /t/ is a /t/ sound (as in 'masTer') pronounced with the middle or back of your tongue touching that part of your mouth, with the air flowing between it and your tongue. Now, the /t/ here is also dental, so you need to also put the tip of your tongue between your teeth, but not quite as much as the sound in 'THink'. It probably sounds very tricky to you :P but believe me, it's far from being the most important part of irish pronunciation.

The /ɑː/ is pronounced like 'awe'.

A palatalised /m/ is pronounced like there was a /j/ sound (as in 'YoYo') after it and fading with it. This sound isn't found in English at all, but I guess you can go with the sounds in the beginning of 'MEow' pronounced fast.

I hope this was helpful :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

yes it was very helpful! I get HOW to pronounce it, but my tongue is refusing to cooperate.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/levan1757
levan1757
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Which is more commonly used: táim or tá mé?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heat33330
heat33330
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AFAIK tá mé is the most common, táim is used in the Munster dialect while tá mé is used in all the others.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KazaRoo

These comments are extremely helpful. Some caught things I didn't think about!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

And they answer a lot of questions.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

does anyone have adivice? i am confuseed by the way things are ordered in irish. also, anyone heard aislings song from the secret of kells or amhran na fairrage from song of the sea? these have sparked my interest.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AtalinaDove
AtalinaDove
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So from what I've gathered so far, being also a beginner at this language (some of this is also in the Tips & Notes section for this skill).

Irish uses the word order of [verb] [subject] [object]. In case you don't know what those are, the verb is the action, the subject is the one doing the action, and the object is what the action is being done to.

There is distinct conjugation in Irish, meaning a different form of a verb based on who is doing it. It's much like the forms we have for "to be" (I AM, he IS, they ARE, you ARE, it IS). Some of the forms have weird exceptions (especially with the form for 'we' and 'I', from what I can tell), like 'táim', which means in and of itself "I am", but it's really in the order "Am I".

So think of sentences like this. "I eat an apple" = "Eat I an apple"

Hope this helps a little! I'm still getting used to it, too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

Thanks! That helps a lot.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/H.S.StanVi
H.S.StanVi
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As a native USA english speaker busily engaged in trying to learn a number of languages using these practice sessions without access to lessons other than the comments of other students, i find, so far, that Irish and Greek are equally most difficult. Recognizing spoken Irish is particularly confusing to me and a slowed version on DL audios would be most helpful. Good luck to all in your studies...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wengusflengus
Wengusflengus
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You should look up the spelling rules of Irish, it's actually pretty regular.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stacey773203

It says to pay attention to accents but my phone doesn't have accented letters. How do I type accented letters with my phone? I have a Samsung 8.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMurray29
JasonMurray29
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Have you tried holding down the 'regular' form of the letter you wish to accent? That works on most mobile devices, I am of current using a Samsung Galaxy j5. Hope that helps :)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TwylaPrice

There are so many ways to say I, you, they and then more when you add am or go or has

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nkwk88
nkwk88
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"Taim bean" or "Is bean me", are both of these correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wengusflengus
Wengusflengus
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No, being a woman isn't a state, it's a characteristic. The difference is more or less the same as that between "ser" and "estar" in Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rhaichanalfauzi
rhaichanalfauzi
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I hear that "Thoim" (?)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wengusflengus
Wengusflengus
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that's roughly how it's pronounced

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DonnaAbruzzese

I've listen to the pronunication several times but want to make sure I'm understanding it, as none of these lessons have a slow option. It sounds to me like Táim is pronounced toe-em. Is that correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

Kinda. HansDazs wrote this on my comment. this might help.

it's ok, it's unknown business to most people :P

The velum is the soft part at the far back of the roof of your mouth, so a velar /t/ is a /t/ sound (as in 'masTer') pronounced with the middle of back of your tongue touching that part of you mouth, with the air flowing between it and your tongue. Now, the /t/ here is also dental, so you need to also put the tip of your tongue between your teeth, but not quite as much as the sound in 'THink'. It probably sounds very tricky to you :P but believe me, it's far from being the most important part of irish pronunciation.

The /ɑː/ is pronounced like 'awe'.

A palatalised /m/ is pronounced like there was a /j/ sound (as in 'YoYo') after it and fading with it. This sound isn't found in English at all, but I guess you can go with the sounds in the beginning of 'MEow' pronounced fast.

I hope this was helpful :P

This was his/her exact words, none of them are mine!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wengusflengus
Wengusflengus
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his ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReclusiveG

[i] [deleted] [/i]

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahBuechi

I would like to have more pronunciation help.. with most of other words there is no one saying the words out loud..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skyler.j53

why does it sound like "poem"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Didi106358

IDIOTS

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yasminkais123

I pressed i am but it came up with am

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamiePower4

Very helpful Gary Varney, thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VyPmJ

Aran is bread.I think I am corret.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMurray29
JasonMurray29
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yup

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmprator12

This might seem really strange, but i cant find the answer on the internet. There is this lady compulsively lying to my family about who she is and where she is from. She "produced" an irish birth certificate, but i dont know if it is forged. Can someone from ireland tell me if it should be typed or handwritten? Also if it is a typical block font or more cursive? Thank you if anyone can help me

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

If we were from ireland, i don't think we would be doing this course. Try putting this somewhere else. Just a suggestion

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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Plenty of Irish people do this course.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMurray29
JasonMurray29
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False, I like doing this course, I can help people who are knew to the language I have learnt since being child

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

Also, I don't know why people are down voting you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMurray29
JasonMurray29
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Should be typed blocks

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RoseleenMo

Gggedd sddjeueeuuedeasdce

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gigglepig0

how can so many people have such a hard time understanding one word

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wengusflengus
Wengusflengus
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I don't know :/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gigglepig0

you do sooo many languages :o

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gigglepig0

suck it I beat u all

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Richard367480

Please dont be rude. You might not know that mean/rude people are just making thereselfs bad so please stop. This is not a place for people to be rude. You can do that on a piece of paper.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endercheez

Please do not insult others. None of us will take it seriously, and how do you have any proof? This sticks around forever, you know.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gerritboehringer

plus it is in the rules of duo not to do that

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Didi106358

STUPID

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Didi106358

he is really STUPID

11 months ago