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  5. "Maidin mhaith!"

"Maidin mhaith!"

Translation:Good morning!

August 26, 2014

64 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pgcasp

My Ulster Irish ear would hear "madjin why!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MhaireMt

That is what I am used to!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stcefce

Ok, so any true Gaeilge here want to say how they'd say "good morning"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heartosay

You wouldn't. The idiomatic greeting, however un-PC it may be, is still "Dia dhuit". (Edit: or "Dia duit ar maidin", as flagged by dubhais below).

Also, "Gaeilge" = Irish language.

"Gaeilgeoir" or "cainteoir Gaeilge" = Irish speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stcefce

Well, alright! Hello, it is, then! And thanks for the heads up about "Gaeilgeoir". I'm still working on these pronunciations - it's harder with no one around to speak it except a computer. Is it "gwale-gor"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heartosay

No prob :)

The pronunciation of "Gaeilgeoir", like everything in Irish, differs by dialect. In Ulster, it would be "GALE-gore", in Connacht it would be "GWAYLE-gyore" and Munster it would be closer to "gwayle-GYORE". Have fun selecting a dialect that meets your needs :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ciaran201

So in Ulster, would Gaeilge be pronounced 'GALE-GUH' as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

You've opened a bit of a can of worms there, ciaran201! The language is variously known as Gaeilge (Standard and Connacht), Gaelainn (Munster), and Gaeilig (Ulster). To hear the respective pronunciations, go to https://www.focloir.ie/en/dictionary/ei/Irish and click on the letters C M U which follow the loudspeaker symbol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stcefce

Also, what would a person from Ireland be called? As Gaeilge?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heartosay

"Éireannach" = Irish person. You will often see "Gael" used as well. That technically only applies to people of Gaelic race/extraction, not those pesky Normans, English, Scottish etc, but it's often used in quite a general sense and would not be considered offensive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stcefce

You are extremely helpful!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HighlanderJosh

Either I misunderstood your comment as a joke, or you just seriously claimed that the Scots are not of Gaelic decent... They are if you did claim that lol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

I don't think heartosay meant to imply that there are no Scots of Gaelic descent, but that there are also Scots who are of non-Gaelic descent.

Scots -- who are a mixture of peoples, just as much as the English and the Irish (do "pure races" even exist?) -- are Picts + Gaels + Ancient Britons + Angles ...without even mentioning the Norse etc. (oops: I just did!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AilbeMille

Agree it's fake and I have never heard it used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dubhais

Alternative: Dia duit ar maidin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ahmagahz

Yeah, that rings a bell. It kind of makes me wonder that there are so few variations on "hello" in Irish compared to any other language I am familiar with. They have formal, informal, slang, long and short forms, etc. Hi, heya, hello, howaya. Hej, goddag, tjena, tjaba, halloj. Salut, bonjour, tiens. Surely TG4 and all have had a bit of impact now? If not, I propose "maid" as a casual/abbreviated morning greeting. It would work perfectly as a mumbled salutation when you've a head on you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dancingirl1

"Tiens" is not a french hello lol, you say that when you show or hand-out something to someone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BartConnol

Cá bhfuil an tae?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heartosay

I have never heard this phrase used in Irish. It's acceptable Scots Gaelic, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ahmagahz

Agreed, I would have thought it was "béarlachas".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dubhais

It's in the dictionary, though, albeit with the preposition do... http://breis.focloir.ie/en/fgb/Maidin_mhaith!
I have suggested an alternative below should you seek one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oopsdaisy13

I'm sure when I've typed the answer 'Good morning' previously the answer has mentioned an alternative 'a good morning'. This time (to aid my memory) I answered 'a good morning' but got it wrong. Have I missed something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The exclamation mark in this exercise strongly implies that it is meant to be a greeting, and it would be unusual to greet someone with “A good morning!” vs. “Good morning!”. Without the exclamation mark, “A good morning” is a valid translation of Maidin mhaith.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MzMolly65

Please help me understand and I'm not very good with English grammer, never mind Irish so please go easy on me with your explanations, LOL!

I thought the lenition was added when an precedes a feminine noun. eg: bean vs an bhean

Good is not a noun and yet maith became mhaith .. can someone help me understand more about this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heartosay

The adjectives of feminine nouns are also lenited.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MzMolly65

Thank you .. so would it be mhaidin mhaith?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heartosay

The definite article is "an mhaidin mhaith", yes. The indefinite article is "maidin mhaith" ("a good morning").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MzMolly65

Thanks for explaining, sending a lingot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SivanaP.D.E.H.

Hi, sorry, I'm very new to Irish, how can you tell which nouns are masculine and which are feminine? Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

You look them up in a dictionary, or you learn them as you go along.

You can make a reasonable accurate assessment of the gender of a noun by following the guidelines here but there is no single, one-line rule that will identify the gender of a noun in Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tanay_b

I need to learn Irish orthography and pronunciation before going any further on Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ACatterpillar

So do Irish adjectives follow the noun, or is it similar to Latin where the placement depends on the adjective?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heartosay

The adjective always follows the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Exceptions include possessive adjectives, (many) numeral adjectives, interrogative adjectives, and the following indefinite adjectives: aon, cibé, gach, gach re, and uile when it means “every”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shirogane_yuu

Can anyone please help me, I am a little confused... What is the difference between maith and mhaith? I thought both of them mean "good", am I wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

This is an essential thing to know as early as possible when learning Irish or any of the Celtic languages. The Celtic language family has something called "initial mutation", where the beginning of words will change depending on how the word is used syntactically. The base word is maith, but when lenited it changes to mhaith (like when used as an adjective for feminine nouns, like maidin). Lenition, eclipsis and prothesis are the three types of initial mutations in Irish, and they are used constantly. Check the tips and notes sections for more detail.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shirogane_yuu

Thank you! I read all tips and notes for lessons I took, and I didn't found this explanation there, maybe it will appear in next lessons. Anyway your answer was very helpfull, thanks again!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MustaphaFagg

Is "Móra na maidine dhuit!" considered stage Oirish by gaeilgeoirí? Is "Maidin mhaith!" considered béarlachas?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monika237085

My answer to Maidin Mhaith was "A good morning" which was not accepted. But later it asked me to write the Irish for "A good morning" to which I wrote Maidin Mhaith and that was accepted. Can anyone explain if one is correct and the other one isn't? Is this a system error? Or am I not understanding something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/asdfqwer159

Is "mhaith" really pronounced so close to the French "moi"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

No. In the Munster dialect, it would be /vah/, and in other dialects, /wah/. The /m/ is never pronounced in "mh."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesseSmith686623

My friend from Belfast says "móra na maidine duit" is also "good morning". Not to add to the confusion, but...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swordsman102002

I heard some people say: "dia daoibh ar maidin." Does it have the same meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

When greeting more than one person, yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BartConnol

Why not "a good morning"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MustaphaFagg

Should not "A good morning!" also be an acceptable translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

See the reply to oopsdaisy13 above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyaAthalia

Just in the prev sentence it said "a good morning". Here, it is not correct. ❤❤❤? lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

See the reply to oopsdaisy13 above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/savagecheetah

when I wrote good morning in the previous test appear A good morning as a solutio. Now I wrote the same and it is wrong and appear good morning. DECIDE WHAT IS THE RIGHT ANSWER to not waste time guessing the answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

See the reply to oopsdaisy13 above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anaphasiy

Is there a rule for why maith undergoes lenition in this phrase or is it just how it's said?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

There is. It's becausemaidin is a feminine noun -- and the "lenitable" initial consonant (p, t, c, b, d, g, m, s, f) of an immediately following adjective is lenited in such circumstances.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fluffs564

Ok so whenever I write "good morning" for this question it says "Another correct solution: A good morning." So this time I wrote "A good morning" and it marked it as wrong! If anyone is able to explain, it would be appreciated. Go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

There are two different exercises - Maidin mhaith!" with an exclamation point, which is a greeting, and only accepts "good morning" as a response (it actually expects "good morning!" with an exclamation point, but punctuation in ignored), and Maidin mhaith without an exclamation point, which isn't a greeting, and is just a phrase that means "a good morning" - bhí maidin mhaith againn ag an margadh* - "we had a good morning at the market".

In the reverse direction, from English to Irish, there are also two different exercises, "A good morning" and "Good morning" but there's no sign of an exclamation point in either of these exercises.

(This question was already asked and answered at least 3 times in the previous comments).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KuoMedia

The pronunciation of mhaith is really giving me trouble. It sounds a bit like it starts with a soft b sound. Is that completely off?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MustaphaFagg

If you type "maidin mhaith" into Forvo.ie, you can hear two gaeilgeoirí say the phrase. If you type it into the synthesizer at Abair.ie and choose Dingle Pen HTS you can hear it pronounced properly (Just kidding!)(sort of).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BartConnol

Im assuming surname Galogley and Gallowglasses have the same Gall = foreigner derivation?

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