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  5. "Comhghairdeas!"

"Comhghairdeas!"

Translation:Congratulations!

August 26, 2014

60 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZelvaCZ

Comhgjdfsdfsdc what? :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.o_

You forgot the accent over the third seven.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanagerMoonmist

Ridiculously difficult to spell! I have to remember it broken up as comh+[g]hair+deas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/17Smileyfaces

You can think, com + hg + hair + ideas without the i


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Desiree29977

"Combing hair" thanks for the memitic!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChromateX

Combing hair ideas!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChromateX

I personally can break it up into "Co mh gh air deas"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaylaThorn

Go home Duolingo, you're drunk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marius.x.u

This is the Irish section so you're not that wrong. Irish is so complicated, I don't know how people can pronounce it drunk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TFG

I don't know how people can pronounce it sober


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpiralStat

Maybe the language was made while a bunch of Irish men were drunk. "hehe, let's do - let's do Comhghairdeas to congratulate people!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashleigh409352

oh my god, that's awesome. i literally laughed for 5 minutes from reading this, go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruamac

I find it amusing that everyone's in awe of the length of this word when the English word, 'Congratulations,' actually has two more letters!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jytou

It's not much the length, much more the 4 contiguous consonants... :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/idshanks

Not to mention two extra syllables :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mungome

I don't have any idea how this should be pronounced. I suppose its because this Irish course is in beta phase, that there is no audio of every sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollajam

http://www.forvo.com/word/comhghairdeas/ has the pronunciation - I grabbed it from another discussion, so I can't take credit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mungome

Go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcilio_mosco

that sounded like "covardes" in portuguese xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yoruji

Since the audio is done by a real human, the reason they do not have audio for each sentence is a financial one (since humans charge per sentence). Other courses are not affected by this, since they use a text-to-speech computer program. They made sure to have at least one audio sentence for each word, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mungome

Thank you for your response. Go raibh maith agat! I understand that financial problem and I didn't mean to complain. Just waiting exited to hear that word pronounced!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yoruji

Same here.. I have trouble enough even typing it correctly, let alone pronounce it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Desiree29977

Yeah, the more complicated the pronounciation, Duolinguo is just like "You're on your own, bub"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Enphlegminguous

Man I went through 13 years of Irish classes in school without ever hearing this word once, so comhghairdeas Duolingo tá tú aláinn!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jytou

And yet you managed to find a pseudo quite as unpronounceable as that word. Comhghairdeas! :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Enphlegminguous

Pronounced enn-flem-ing-gew-oss lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soupandbread

It gets worse, the Donegal spelling of this word is: comhghairdeachas!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Also what I've heard in Connemara.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4oh4

People in Connemara are weirdos though, everyone knows that!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/langman.

Not yet invented a good synthesizer for the irish....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruamac

abair.ie is a great synthesizer for the Irish! Also, focloir.ie gives pronunciations in Ulster, Munster, and Leinster dialects.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Connacht, not Leinster. There is no Leinster dialect, and the last bit of Irish alive in Leinster, in Omeath County Louth, was actually a dialect of Ulster Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4oh4

What about the micro-dialect in Meath? Technically Connachta but it's it own Gaeltacht.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

It's Connacht Irish, not Leinster Irish; farmers were settled there from Connemara less than 100 years ago.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chaered

There's a secret competition between Irish and French to come up with the word containing the largest number of silent letters. Pour Irlande, douze points.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BRyeO12

This word doesn't have any silent letters though c - /k/ o - /ɔ/ mh - /w/ gh - /ɣ/ ai - /a/ r - /ɾ/ d - /dʲ/ ea - /ə/ s - /s/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saturnwings

If you know what you're doing, you could still spell French phonetically, though, even with all those stupid silent letters. Irish ... boy am I sucking at this!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ButMadNNW

Reminds me of Domhnall Gleeson's name, which is pronounced "doe-nahl".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jytou

They fixed it into "Coe gar jiss" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NealFisher

"Right, Ireland, we'll let you keep using your language, but in return, you use our alphabet! Do we have a deal?"

"snrk Yeah, all right, sure."

"We want to be able to read it, you see."

"Oh, don't worry, you'll be able to READ it..."

"...What's so funny?"

"Nothing, nothing...!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConODonovan

I like to think of this word as comh = together, ghair = laugh, deas = nicely.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

It's actually from comh (mutual, together, in common, co-) + gairdeas (joy, gladness, rejoicing). So, I think of it as its literal meaning: "mutual gladness" or "rejoicing together".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kami916645

Thank you!!! That's the question I was about to ask. Woot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beardpower

Is "congrats" accepted? Or is there a different word to shorten it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kenan820

It was accepted. 1 Nov 2014


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.o_

I typed 'congratz' because I was bored and wanted to see what happened, and it said I had a typo and corrected 'congratz' to 'congrats' and didn't ding me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reneewritesem

Is there a shorter term, too, like "congrats"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Some would say that this is the shorter version - comhgairdeachas is also used (I'm told it's Ulster Irish, but I hear it a lot for a "non-standard" variant).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConODonovan

I learned Munster Irish as a child and would have thought comhgairdegas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hL16gFCQ

Help! I came across this phrase today, "Táim ag ithe pióige," I am eating pizza." Tá sí ag ithe sceallóg." She is eating chips.

What I wish to establish is, why is 'an tuiseal ginideach' being used on the nouns immediately after the verb 'ithe'? 0ne chip = sceallóg; more than one chip = sceallóga. Pióg = pizza so why am I eating pióige??? It IS 'an tuiseal ginideach' - isn't it??????????????????????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1447

A discussion about Comhghairdeas isn't the best place to ask a question like this, but here goes.

The verb is ith - ag ithe is actually using the verbal noun form, and the object of the progressive verbal noun (ag verbal-noun) is in the genitive. (Someone pointed out that tá sí ag ithe píoige could be crudely translated as "she is at eating of pie", where the genitive is more obvious).

píog is "pie", not "pizza" (píotsa, ag ithe píotsa).

So, itheann sí sceallóga - "she eats chips", but tá sí ag ithe sceallóg - "she is eating chips" (scealloga is the nominative plural, sceallóg is the genitive plural).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeoffMcHarg

Ok, I admit I am asking a silly question. Why is it spelled this way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1447

That's like asking why French people spell "Paree" as "Paris", and Italians spell "chow" as "ciao" and Spanish speakers spell "heyzeus" as "Jesus".

Different languages have different mappings between letters/letter combinations and sounds. comhghairdeas makes sense when you follow the Irish rules for mapping sounds to letters.

(Most of the questions asked, and most of the resources available, ask the opposite question - "how do I pronounce this jumble of letters?", but the question that you ask, "how do I write down the sound that I hear?" is also important).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roran212

is it pronounced "co - hor - dis"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Denise763738

Sounds like "co-har-diss" to me. Thank you, Duo, for the audio, or I'd be completely lost!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sunshinetrinket

I was going to talk about how weird it was spelled but then I remembered I can't spell congratulations in English either

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