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  5. "Léann na mná."

"Léann na mná."

Translation:The women read.

August 26, 2014

53 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StrapsOption

Thought I should mention: Most plurals in Irish actually do sound like the singular even though 'bean - mná' doesn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kbalara

I can remember the name, but there is an indian language in which bhn (sounds like bean) means "to want" and bhná (sounds like mná) means want it!

There same pattern! :O


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zesul

I am curious to know which Indian language that is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielohuh

You made a good choice


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vselep

How you pronounce mná


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

Just as it's written. An m sound, an n sound, a long a. So rather like am not without the initial a and the final t.

Also, in some dialects, it's pronounced mrá (though still written mná).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael880308

Aha! On the Android app at least it's definitely pronounced mrá, which threw me completely. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Baloug

That is because the audio has changed (it's way better now).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Telisa7

It sounded like ra to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamCamero3

My Irish teacher is a native speaker from Connemara and pointed out that people from Connemara pronounce it like ''mrá'' as opposed to ''mNá''. Just thought I should mention this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gloramaria

I heard an "r", thanks for the clarification


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielWill440084

Was wondering why it says "Na mrá" in the example but is spelled 'mná'

Duo didnt really explain and I was confused lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveCimin

Why is most of the irish not read aloud and there is no chance for me to speak it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

For all (?) other languages, Duolingo uses a machine voice - those can read out any sentence at all.

For Irish, they don't have a suitable machine voice, so they got a real person to record sentences. But the speaker didn't record every single possible sentence that Duolingo can create, so many sentences are without pronunciation :(

Especially unfortunate given that Irish pronunciation is not exactly intuitive to beginning learners!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erin710635

Doot doo da do doo Léann Na Mná...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Baloug

Does anyone have an etymological explanation for "bean" vs. "mná"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnLonDubhBeag

It's been that way since Proto-Celtic, not sure about Indo-European.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SRFlo

Does anyone know which dialects pronounce it mná and which ones say "mra"? Just trying to stay consistent. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnLonDubhBeag

Connacht and Ulster have Mrá, Munster has Mná


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kes654325

Pronunciation please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NealFisher

No, "The women are reading" doesn't work for this one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paul5121

For everyone's record, that would be "Tá na mná ag léamh"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/potatoeglot

Does this literally translate to "The women is at eating"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Torsby

No, but it does translate to "The women are at reading" ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/potatoeglot

Ah, my mistake. Thanks! The wording is very different from what I'm used to, but that's what makes learning Irish fun :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnLonDubhBeag

crimson_seraph is correct, that is the literal translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnLonDubhBeag

Yes that is its literal translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kimberlytylr

That makes so much more sense; thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, Irish distinguishes between "they read" and "they are reading" - just as English does!

(This may not be a coincidence; I have heard it said that the English "is doing" form may be a Celtic influence.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.o_

Why on Earth does continuous not come until after the last checkpoint?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

I think that all courses here conform to the same lesson plan, regardless of whether that's entirely senseless or not. Irish is just weird (like its neighbour, English) in having a continuous tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dat_one_gi

How is mná pernounced?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobArrgh

See the response from "altaltane" at the top of the thread.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ahmagahz

I really need to keep in mind the difference between habitual present and simple present. In my Irish English "the women read" sounds really unnatural as as well, I use "do be" as habitual/continuous present tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nawalnassor02

I wrote the woman reads it didnt except just because of the s


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No, it's not the -s that it didn't like; it's the -a- of "woman". You should have written "women" with an -e-, because "na mná" is plural: many women, not one woman.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/becky3086

I wrote "Women read" . This is not correct. It has to have "The" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, because the Irish has na.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soupyjam

Is it "na" instead of "an" because the subject is plural?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trouvere.oublie

Is there a sound "m" at the end of "Léann"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meg.Murphy

Why do I hear an 'r' sound in the pronunciation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

See the thread started by "vselep".

Basically, some dialects pronounce it mrá (but still write mná).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meg.Murphy

Thanks - I thought I was hearing things!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicole778488

please Can You Make Phrases A Tiny Harder Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wydok42

How the heck do you go from "bean" as singular woman to "mná" as pural wimen???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

According to Wikipedia, bean evolved via a form ben from a Proto-Celtic form benā.

I don't know anything about Old Irish but I imagine that what happened is that final vowels got dropped in the singular form but kept in the plural form, but that the plural form dropped the interior vowel for some inflection-related reason and that then the consonant combination bn- got turned into mn- for easier pronunciation.

The shift from ben to bean, on the other hand, is due to newer orthography more clearly marking slender and broad consonants.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnLonDubhBeag

Although there are etymological reasons for this, in the current language it's simply an irregular plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/conormurt230

i said ;the women reads; and it was given wrong i am not happy fight me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

In English, a plural noun such as "the women" does not take an -s on the verb.

So the correct form is "The women read."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CalebCavan

Man this can get confusing to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/happytown3000

I entered "the women are reading" which should be the same as "the women read," right? They're both present tense in English...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

They're two different present tenses, though - one is present simple and one is present continuous.

Irish has a very similar distinction into a present simple and a present continuous tense. (In fact, I think I've seen the claim that the continuous aspect in English may be due to Celtic influence.)

This course starts by teaching the present simple tense in Irish, so it should be translated into present simple in English. Present continuous will come later.

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