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"Labhraímid Gaeilge."

Translation:We speak Irish.

4 years ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sigmacharding
sigmacharding
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We certainly do now!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Languagease

Hopefully.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReaperPaladin

i can't get the hang of this dang language. so confusing as to where and when lenitions come in. that dang peach gets me every time

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CoolStuffYT
CoolStuffYT
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yes! agree.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpaghettiCorgi

YOU LEARN ALL LANGUAGES?!?!?!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sigmacharding
sigmacharding
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Not yet- check those I follow- some have completed all their trees!

I'm getting there- tá 'list' agam!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpaghettiCorgi

YOU'RE AMAZING!!! (So are all those other people you follow).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DiegoJaviUnlam
DiegoJaviUnlam
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I am still learning it! ;D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DiegoJaviUnlam
DiegoJaviUnlam
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Comhghairdeas! =))

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JessArgh

So why is Gaelic not accepted as the answer to Gaeilge? I've been told by natives that they call it both Irish and Gaelic.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Not really. Gaelic is a family of languages, including Scottish Gaelic and Manx, as well as Irish. They generally only call it Gaelic for foreigners, and it's referred to as Irish in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maitulol

Gaelic is in Celtic languages Gaelic does not mean Irish and Scottish Gaelic is Oster Gaelic please check your facts

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yevb0
yevb0
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Like galaxyrocker said.

In Scotland, they call their variety of the same language Gaelic, but in Ireland it's tired up with Irish nationalism, so to emphasize that it is they language of the people (as the French speak French...), the English version of the name has sort of been "branded" in a sense as Irish

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

They call it Gaidhlig in Scotland because "Scottish" is already spoken for.

Scholars study "Primitive Irish", "Old Irish" and "Middle Irish", which gave rise to "Early Modern Irish" which gave rise to Modern Irish, Scottish Gaelic and Manx. The use of the term "Irish" to describe the language is not tied up with nationalism.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yevb0
yevb0
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Sorry, I really oversimplified. I didn't mean so much the particulars of Irish politics as the tendency to prefer names that reflect people's identity

Much how Norwegian/Swedish and Serbian/Croatian are (arguably) varieties of a single language, but because they are part of the national identities of their speakers, they prefer to have their own label (especially in other languages, like English)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Wouldn't this more commonly be "Tá Gaeilge againn"?

EDIT: If I recall the explanation I saw elsewhere, "Tá Gaeilge againn" would indicate that we have the ability to speak Irish, which is more common to use, and "Labhraímid Gaeilge" would indicate, for example, that Irish is the language that is spoken at the office (but when they're off duty, they go back to English).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Think of Labhraímid Gaeilge. as “We (habitually) speak Irish.” rather than as “We (are able to) speak Irish.”

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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I think I've got the distinction. In a nutshell, "to have Irish" means you can and "to speak Irish" means you do. Go raibh maith agat.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yevb0
yevb0
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It seems like DuoLingo would want us to know this, because the construction "I speak x" almost always means ability in English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Discussions such as this one allow people here to learn such distinctions of meaning.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yevb0
yevb0
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true true =)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tom665063

I find the pronunciation good

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PinkRose98

How do you pronounce "Labhraímid"? I say it sort of "la-oo-ree-im-eed", is that correct? (The sound isn't working on my phone right now)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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I'm not sure how accurate the voice is, but it's saying "lau-ree-meed".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barrbelle
Barrbelle
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On my computer it sounds almost like "vol-u-meds gre-guh" like it starts with a "v" and gaelige has an "r" sound with the first g. Confusing when I read how others are hearing it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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I couldn't understand the new speaker at all on this one. I am doing my lessons over to try to see if it will help me understand this speaker better but frankly I just don't think it is going to help if she doesn't pronounce them well enough to hear it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aislinnkir1

Gaeilge is still Irish, you don't say "I'm learning Irish" you say "I'm learning Gaeilge" to your Irish family. Irish is a person, Gaeilge is the language

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barrbelle
Barrbelle
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That left me completely flummoxed. I wish there were more mic buttons that worked so I could hear letter combinations and get a feel for that. They are very non intuitive for me. Is there somewhere I could hear letter sounds together or learn their rules? Is that somewhere on this site and I missed it? Like what an "l" sounds like at the beginning of a word or what sound "bh" together makes? Thanks.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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https://www.duolingo.com/Barrbelle
Barrbelle
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Thank you. I will check it out.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Em7oaA

For the life of me I can't spell "Labhraímid"!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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It will come with time and practice. It took me a while to be able to spell "comhghairdeas".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maitulol

So just a question Gaeilge means Gaelic not Irish right

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Relatively few Irish speakers refer to the language as "Gaelic", unless they are speaking to people who don't know much about the Irish language, or are they are speaking in a technical or historical context. In Ireland, "Gaelic" is a somewhat archaic term.

So in Ireland, where the vast majority of the worlds Irish speakers live, Gaeilge means "Irish", (ie the language).

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickMur482858

Apparently Gaeilge =/= Gaelic, but specifically Irish?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

In Ireland, the term "Gaelic" is considered more or less archaic. Like "phonograph", people know what you're talking about, but "Gaelic" is just a word that's mainly used to refer to Gaelic football these days. Being a fluent Irish speaker is not a requirement for joining the Gaelic Players Association.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamiewilson1978

I'm typing it correctly, but it is counting it wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TriciaSton3

I translated this correctly

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/L3xisPlex
L3xisPlex
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Oh, so irish is a Gallic language. (maybe THE Gallic language?) This explains the ridiculous amounts of unpronounced letters!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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This explains the ridiculous amounts of unpronounced letters!

You've obviously never studied French.

And Irish spelling rules are a lot more consistent than English (or French) spelling rules. They're merely different from what you're used to.

Sounds and Spelling of Irish

1 month ago