"I eat vegetables and sauce."

Translation:Ithim glasraí agus anlann.

4 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sigmacharding
sigmacharding
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If this aids memory: "glasraí" is related to the irish word "glás" meaning GREEN

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/glasra#Irish

A bit like verduras in spanish

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dangantitan

Glas is also "blue" in Welsh.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Colour words in different languages often don't overlap exactly. "green" can be both uaine and glas in Irish, with glas covering the bluer end of the spectrum (some shades of "blue" in English would traditionally be glas in Irish), and uaine covering the yellower end.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MayteStiles
MayteStiles
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It does help. Thanks.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlesDoy2
CharlesDoy2
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I'm reasonably certain that 'Itheann mé' and 'Ithim' are both acceptable conjugations of the first person singular of the verb 'ith'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s0lolol

You're correct it should be an acceptable answer. Rather like the difference between saying "I am XYZ" and "I'm XYZ" in English. One form sounds slightly more formal to my ear.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
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Only Ithim is accepted in Standard Irish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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But learners should be aware that they'll never cause confusion or consternation saying 'itheann mé'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sufyazi
sufyazi
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Could anyone enlighten me as to why this is wrong: itheann glasraí agus anlann mé

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
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The word order in Irish is Verb - Subject - Object. Your sentence would translate as "Vegetables and sauce eat me".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoriaSabin

"mé" needs to be right after "Itheann." If it said this: "Itheann mé glasraí agus anlann." It should be correct. "Itheann mé" and "Ithim" should be the same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gpgallagher
gpgallagher
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I'm wondering exactly what "anlann" is. The translation is "sauce", but is this some specific kind of sauce, or is it a broad category including salad dressings, pasta sauces, gravies, and various bottled condiments?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
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It means the same as "sauce" in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoriaSabin

What does "anlann" sound like? The pronunciation on forvo.com doesn't sound correct at all.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
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Click here for examples in the three main dialects.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DevonKelliher

here, ithim and itheann are both accepted forms of "i eat"?

is the root of the verb "ith"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Itheann by itself is not "I eat"; it's just "eat(s)". "Itheann mé" is "I eat", as is "ithim".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaMaria96315

Can you say, ta glasrai agus anlann ithim?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
SatharnPHL
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No - you have two verbs in that sentence, "tá" and "ithim", so it doesn't make any sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MayteStiles
MayteStiles
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I gather that "l" has an allophone close to a "u" sound" anlann or aunlann, and if I heard right, anlann can alternatively be pronounced amlann?

It is interesting that in latin derived languages "l" alternates with "u", so that some words that have "l" in spanish have a corresponding "u" sound in Luso-Brasilian, or in Portuguese , Catalan, Gallego, etc.

In some American and British English variants, "l" often behaves like "u" and "w" when preceded by "a": Autumn, Autistic, Awesome, Awful, Altar, etc...

The "au" combination doesn't exist before "m" in English, except in a few borrowed words from irish, arabic or other languages.

Interestingly enough, though, we find French-English cognate words where the French counterpart has a "u" that corresponds to an "l" in English:

aumone /alms, psalm/psaume. This can be explained in terms of the fact that the "u" and the "l" sounds are articulatorily related.

So the pronunciation of phonemes depends not only on themselves but on the neighbouring sounds which surround them. And this is true of all languages.

1 year ago
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