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  5. "I eat vegetables and sauce."

"I eat vegetables and sauce."

Translation:Ithim glasraí agus anlann.

August 26, 2014

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sigmacharding

If this aids memory: "glasraí" is related to the irish word "glás" meaning GREEN

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/glasra#Irish

A bit like verduras in spanish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joshuaburrow

Glas is also "blue" in Welsh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Colour words in different languages often don't overlap exactly. "green" can be both uaine and glas in Irish, with glas covering the bluer end of the spectrum (some shades of "blue" in English would traditionally be glas in Irish), and uaine covering the yellower end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MayteStiles

It does help. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesDoy2

I'm reasonably certain that 'Itheann mé' and 'Ithim' are both acceptable conjugations of the first person singular of the verb 'ith'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s0lolol

You're correct it should be an acceptable answer. Rather like the difference between saying "I am XYZ" and "I'm XYZ" in English. One form sounds slightly more formal to my ear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

Only Ithim is accepted in Standard Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

But learners should be aware that they'll never cause confusion or consternation saying 'itheann mé'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gpgallagher

I'm wondering exactly what "anlann" is. The translation is "sauce", but is this some specific kind of sauce, or is it a broad category including salad dressings, pasta sauces, gravies, and various bottled condiments?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

It means the same as "sauce" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maple.Staple

I'm wonderjng if the accents above the i have a specific meaning. Do they signify which syllable is stressed or anything like that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1446

The síneadh fada or just fada makes i and í completely different letters - they are pronounced differently, and they aren't interchangeable.

briste means "broken", bríste means "(a pair of) trousers", fear means "man", féar means "grass", sean means "old", séan means "deny" or "refuse", Seán is a name, a form of "John".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sufyazi

Could anyone enlighten me as to why this is wrong: itheann glasraí agus anlann mé


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

The word order in Irish is Verb - Subject - Object. Your sentence would translate as "Vegetables and sauce eat me".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoriaSabin

"mé" needs to be right after "Itheann." If it said this: "Itheann mé glasraí agus anlann." It should be correct. "Itheann mé" and "Ithim" should be the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DevonKelliher

here, ithim and itheann are both accepted forms of "i eat"?

is the root of the verb "ith"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Itheann by itself is not "I eat"; it's just "eat(s)". "Itheann mé" is "I eat", as is "ithim".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanEML

I know this is not what is being asked, but if "le" translate to "with", would "Ithim glasraí le anlann" be an acceptable translation of "I eat vegetables with sauce"? Go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1446

Yes, that "with" is translated as le.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack777wol

Could someone explain why "glasraí is anlann" is wrong here? When can you use "is" for "have"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1446

Did you mean is for "and"?

agus is usually only written as is with numbers and in "fixed phrases" like corp is anam, amach is isteach, óg is aosta, anonn is anall, etc.

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