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"Ní thaitním."

Translation:I do not shine.

3 years ago

73 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Bryan.EDU

Does this mean I literally don't shine or I don't shine in the sense of I don't stick out of the crowd?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It’s only the literal meaning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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What IS the literal meaning. "I don't shine--the car?" " I mean I have no idea how this could be used. Why would you ever say "I don't shine" unless shine is a verb?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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I may rise but I refuse to shine? Nah, probably not.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdub4language
cdub4language
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Xena reference? That's what came to my mind...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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the shine in a crowd stuff is an English idiomatic usage for shine

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/p8c
p8c
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bryanedu- that is exactly my question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oftkiltered
oftkiltered
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I've heard in English (appalachian I think) one would "take a shine to" or "take a shining to" something as in "take a liking to"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The oldest recorded entry in the OED for “take a shine to” was from 1839; it originated in the US. A certain W. Churchill used it in one of his writings in 1908, so it’s been in use on both sides of the Atlantic for a while now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andalula

Although I can't recall many off-hand, I've heard of other North Americanisms that are attributed to Irish immigrants using their words and having them morph into words we use today. I think "shenanigans" might be one. And the Appalachian Mountains are home to many Scotch-Irish....?

I also once heard...somewhere....and forgive me if it was here on Duo... That when Appalachians would say, "I was a'runnin and a'singing" it was because of the Irish ag siúl, pronounced a'shool (not IPA, sorry) for the present participle (English -ing).

I'd really like to think that Gaelige has left its mark on American English, considering our huge diaspora.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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There are a few possibilities for the origins of “shenanigan” — one of them is (pre-reform) Irish {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}sionnaċuiġim (“I play tricks”, more literally “I act the fox”). A post-reform spelling for it might be sionnachaím.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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Another possibility is the Middle English perfect tense formation. As with modern German, both Middle English and Old English past participles were formed with an initial syllable usually written ge- in German (gekommen) but y- in English (ycomen, ycumen). The old poem "Summer is a-coming in" is originally "Somer is ycumen in" meaning "Summer has come in".

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
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My mother used to say "He's taken a shine to you", to mean "He likes you." (Montreal Canadian of Irish origin - her family had settled in Sheenboro in the Outaouais region of Quebec, but I don't know what part of Ireland they were from.) It's amazing how many words she used to use that turn out to be of Irish origin, like "gawm" or "gom" for a stupid person ("Don't be such a gom!" It took me ages to find that word anywhere, partly because I wasn't sure how to spell it) , or "puss" for face but not a compliment ("Look at the puss on you!"), or "queer" for "strange" (as in, "He's a queer one!") She also used to call "tea" "tae" sometimes (although I was't sure if it was the Irish "tae" or the French "thé", since she was raised in Montreal.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bartsci

I hear the expression used not infrequently (Belfast)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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it could be a idiomatic usage of a literal phrase - when you shine old silver it brightens it like new - similar to when you like something new you may become more alive and brightened with happiness

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Burkey0
Burkey0
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No more shines Billy

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kanhir
Kanhir
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Never seen this on its own; I've only ever seen "Ni thaitníonn ___ liom" or similar. Learn something new every day!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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You might have heard the typical school phrase tá an ghrian ag taitneamh, though?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neeliecat
neeliecat
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the shining ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/epingchris
epingchris
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So does "Ní" cause lenition of the following verb?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It does with most verbs; the exceptions are faigh, where it causes eclipsis in the indicative past, future, and conditional, and abair, where no mutations happen to its forms that begin with the letter D.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/onlycookie
onlycookie
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Lenition and eclipsis will bring me into a long-term love-hate relationship between Irish and me :-/ At least I can now see it as a 'trigger' for lenition.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MagAonghusa
MagAonghusa
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I don't understand the English sentence. Is it a figurative statement?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oppikoppi
oppikoppi
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think of a certain vampire...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaWorley1

Which certain vampier?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SolSD
SolSD
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Edward Cullen

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zzxj
zzxj
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Taitin sé liom = I like him

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vanja0
vanja0
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Wouldn't that be ''Taitníonn sé liom''?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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No; it’s a literal statement.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/truthfinder

It accepts "I don't like"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It shouldn’t accept that; it only means “like” when the preposition le accompanies it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLea11
MaryLea11
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I have reported this in your behalf

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BaiShann
BaiShannPlus
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Still isn't working.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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cullen alert

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FionaMcGla

"Shine" is a translation for this that I have never heard of! And it didn't accept "like" from me, but like is correct!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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It's not right. The same word, but a different construction:

Taithníonn sé = 'he shines' Taithníonn sé liom = 'He pleases me', 'I like him' (literally, 'he shines with me')

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLea11
MaryLea11
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I am hoping that this verb will be used later on in the course in a more useful and colloquial way. Fingers crossed at any rate.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JosephGlea

Anyone else a Firefly fan? Shiney

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/segviolation
segviolation
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So is "Ní thaitním" something like "nobody likes me"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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No; it’s literally “I don’t shine”.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Greyman125
Greyman125
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Can this be used with an object? For instance, "I don't shine shoes for a living." Or is it always in the sense of "I don't shine because I am not the sun"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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No; taitin meaning “shine” is always intransitive. The “polish”, “make shiny by rubbing”, and “create light with” transitive meanings of English “shine” (e.g. shoes, brass, and lantern respectively) are not expressed with taitin ; each of these meanings is expressed differently in Irish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Greyman125
Greyman125
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Go raibh maith agat.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread

'Snas' is the verb for polish. The word for polished or shiny is 'snasta' which, supposedly, is were we get the word snazzy from.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The OED gives the US as the origin of “snazzy”, and its earliest written reference is from 1932. Dinneen provided the following definition for snasta :

varnished, glossed, coloured; neat, trimmed, lopped, elegant.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread

The story I heard is that 'snasta' made its way to the US via Irish speaking immigrants, probably around the mid 19th century. At some point over the next century it was adopted into US English, complete with snazzy new spelling. Unfortunately I've no evidence for this but it sounds plausable.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CoraOSulli

Can I just say that the Irish school systems teaches Taitneamh as enjoy?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Taitneamh is a noun that can mean “enjoyment”; it’s not a verb that can mean “enjoy”.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
Deo.
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Sounds like a pretty sad sentence...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeghanMcGill

I feel like the pronunciation is a tiny bit off. It's ní thaitním, so it would be pronounced 'nee hat-neem' because there isn't a 'h' after the second 't'. I could be wrong, but as an Irish person it doesn't sound right to me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesRichardson2

So, is 'th' always pronounced as an 'h'? And the recording certainly doesn't seem to pronounce the second 't'. The whole word seems to be being pronounced 'haneem'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

When a consonant is lenited, the pronunciation changes. When "t" is lenited, it is pronounced "h".

In this case, the second "t" in taitním is typically pronounced as if it was "th" in Munster and Connacht Irish. You can hear some of the regional variations in the examples of taitneamh on teanglann.ie.

Most children will learn to say these words long before they learn to read or write them, and this is just an example where the typical spoken pronunciation doesn't quite match the written spelling.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesRichardson2

Ah, OK, I see, thanks. The Duolingo audio's good, but sometimes an explanation of how something's pronounced, and why it's pronounced that way, helps a lot. Otherwise, I wonder whether the audio is incorrect, or whether there's some subtle part of the pronunciation I'm not hearing. I've bookmarked teanglann.ie too, as it looks quite useful.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zzxj
zzxj
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Is there a difference between broad and slender th/sh?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

In general, a lenited t and s will be pronounced as "h", but if you assign the "glide" in a slender cluster to the consonant rather than the vowel, then obviously broad and slender are different.

For example, you can tell the difference between a shaol and a sheoladh.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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what about the English verb that means scrubbing/rubbing something like a car that produces a shine/glossy finish? - shining? Or is this only about liking someone, taking a shining to someone - a pleasant feeling towards someone?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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See my first reply to Greyman125 and my reply to truthfinder above for answers to your questions.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Conchubhar1987

I answered 'I don't enjoy', and it was given as correct, but i didn't realise there was a 'shine' meaning too!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Billbixly

Who does shine?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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A crazy diamond?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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I have looked through all these and still do not understand what it means to "shine" in these sentences. I don't understand how a person can "shine". To me the only way a person can "shine" is to make something else shine (as in shoes) but I did already see that that is wrong. I can see how the sun can shine but I don't understand how a person can..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Taitin simply means “shine” in the sense of “emit light”, so Ní thaitním means “I don’t shine” = “I don’t emit light”. Thus, Taitním would mean “I shine” = “I emit light”; if it would be easier to comprehend, think of some extraterrestrial person who‘s capable of emitting light saying it rather than a human saying it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Have you heard the song "Let it shine!", but I don't know if that is what they could mean. "This little heart of mine, I'm going to let it shine..."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jewgoslav
JewgoslavPlus
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Please, what is the infinitive form of this word? I've been looking for ages but cannot find it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Irish doesn’t have infinitives. The second-person singular imperative conjugation (in this case, taitin) is typically used as a verb’s dictionary headword.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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this does lead to some confusion for new learners...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdub4language
cdub4language
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https://www.duolingo.com/Jewgoslav
JewgoslavPlus
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Go raibh maith agat.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bartsci

'ní thaitnim nar thaiteann tú'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NancyAnn11

I get the same kind of closeness when something reminds me of my grandfather talking.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeoTheWorst

I shine not.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrpotatocake

I've never heard this mean 'to shine', I've only ever heard or seen it used to mean 'like'

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barytonal

I wonder what the actual point of this sentence is. Clearly it's useless on its own (unless you are having a conversation about shining) so is Duolingo trying to make some grammatical point? Such as it not meaning "I do not like it"?

1 month ago