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"Léim."

Translation:I read.

4 years ago

133 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Sawyer_Sarah

Finding humor in confusion between jump and read. What is reading if not jumping word to word or jumping image to meaning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Darren20500

Could leim be translated as I jump or is that leim me?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
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I jump would be Léimim in Standard Irish. Léim mé means I jumped. Léim on its own could also be a command to one person: Jump!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Shouldn't they change the hint to put "jump" or "to jump" instead of "jumped" which would only happen with another word?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kate821475

good luck learning all those languages :)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfieldcorbett

That would be 'léim mé' or 'léimim'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

Yeah, but 'léim' could be translated as 'to jump'. It's too ambiguous, I think, without a hint that it refers to a verb in An Aimsir Láithreach.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobKaucher
BobKaucher
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I agree, with no context this absolutely could be confused with the verbal noun or the singular imperative of léim. But anyone suggesting it should be translated as "I jump" is incorrect in that instance.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gear99
Gear99
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Léim can mean either 'to jump', 'a jump', 'jump' or 'I read (Pres. Tense)'. It does not mean I jump (Léimim) or I jumped (Léim mé).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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It was quite simple once upon a time: léigh + -im = léighim. Then some smart men in Dublin took it upon themselves to 'modernise' Irish orthography.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shauna_daly

no no no no no no no no no no!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nataliaaab

snapchat me natbenito

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasMRS
ThomasMRS
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hi 1900s guy artari is not da best

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hounddogdolan

ambigiuos

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpiralStat

It sounds like it's pronounced as lame... READING ISNT LAME!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grace419433

True dat (btw you look good as a dog)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olivia745050

I think that reading is fun!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaasiel19615

hi

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catsruletheworld

it says that léim is translated to jumped or I read here but when I typed in jumped it said that I was wrong, when it said that it was acceptable. that sucks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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It does mean "jumped", but you would always need a subject with it to express that meaning. "Léim mé": I jumped. The past tense (and not only) of the verb to jump just happens to end in -im. It's not a personal ending.

"Léim" on it its own could only mean "I read"; here, there is no extra subject pronoun, so it's clear that the -im means "mé"

(And indeed, you can say léann mé = "I read")

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasMRS
ThomasMRS
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NONONONONONONONONONONOONONONOONONONOONONONONONOONONONOONNONONOONNONOONNOOOOOOOOOOO TO MANY WORRRRRDDDDDS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grace419433

Would you like a cup of tea. It helps me calm down... Now lets see what types i have..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMurray29
JasonMurray29
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Oooh, i wud love a nice cuppa

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfieldcorbett

There's no verb subject there, Duolingo normally asks for those. It is a bit confusing if you're not used to the synthetic forms of verbs in Irish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keltoniaz

I am also confused, I typed in "I read" and it marked that as wrong too. If both are wrong, then what is the correct answer?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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"I read" is correct. See the top of this page.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keltoniaz

But..... That's what I put, and it said I was wrong..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emmetcurran

Same here

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/star-milk

Can someone explain the difference between "léigh" and " léamh"? The latter is the "verbal noun," correct? What would we call the former?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lyaninno
lyaninno
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does irish have infinitives?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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And the dictionary form is actually the imperative. This is the base form from which you remove the -igh and so on.

Examples of some dictionary forms/imperatives:

bí: be (present tense tá sé) léigh: read (present tense léann sé) ól: drink (present tense ólann sé)

and all those 11 irregular verb forms mentioned in the notes (abair, clois, tar, etc.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Not in the same way English does, no. In Irish, you use the verbal noun to form an infinitive structure.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrianDavern

snapchat? ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jameswalsh16

No Bother ;) ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RainLopez1

Im having trouble pronouncing this word can someone help

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

Sorry, my knowledge of IPA is somewhat lacking, so I will have to present an approximation with English spelling: lyeyim

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/léigh#Irish seems to be a good start for the IPA of this word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sarahlittle154

Why is mine saying that léim is i read?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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Léim (or léann mé) means "I read". Not sure what your question is aiming at, but if you say the tooltip that says "jump", don't worry about it for now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the3lusive
the3lusive
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How do you find the root of the word in Irish ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

This is actually a bit of an exception. Originally, the word would have been 'léighim', but I think it was shorted to 'léim' as a result of the spelling reform of An Caighdeán Oifigiúil (I might be wrong). The original spelling unambiguously identifies the root as 'léigh' and the declension suffix '-im'.

The vast majority of Irish verbs - except for this and perhaps some of the irregular verbs - are spelt unambiguously.

For example:

  • 'clois' (to hear), 'cloisim' (I hear)

  • 'ith' (to eat), 'ithim' (I eat)

  • 'imir' (to play), 'imrím' (I play)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the3lusive
the3lusive
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OK thanks, so you're saying I should remove the pronoun at the end and assume the beginning part as the root ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

It's an acceptable rule of thumb for most cases. Sometimes, the root is shortened for declension, like with 'imir' -> 'imrím'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the3lusive
the3lusive
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OK thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Richard367480

I hate this new audio! It sounded like iheann ull, but it said I was wrong and it said Leim! I like the other audio better! Why did they change it anyways?!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

If that's the case, report it as a bug. This word sounds like 'léim' to me. They changed it because the previous speaker was not a native speaker and made serious mistakes in pronunciation. The new speaker is a native speaker; this is how we should be learning the language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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It sounds like "nayim" to me. I can't hear an "l" at all.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

It's definitely an "l". Don't worry - you just have to get used to it. Irish is one of the phonologically richest languages that I've ever come across and it's a struggle for many non-native speakers to get the sounds right, including millions of Irish people.

Though this page refers to a different word ("léim", "to jump"), it is pronounced the same as "léim" ("I read") for Connacht at least: http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fuaim/l%c3%a9im

As I said above, the closest English approximation is "lyeyim"; the "i" is very subtle.

The slender "l" into "é" here involves sliding the top of the tongue along the palate from back to front. Place your tongue flat against your palate with the tip about 5 millimetres from your top central incisors. As you make the "lyey" sound, it will naturally slide towards your teeth and off your palate as you open your mouth to pronounce the vowel.

For the "i" part - this can be done while your mouth is closing; you do not need to open it again. If you were to be pronouncing the hypothetical word "lém", you would relax your tongue and close your mouth to pronounce the "m". However, in this case, as your mouth is closing, pull your tongue backwards to pronounce what would be "ih" in English. In my case, it broadens and ends up between my molars as I pronounce it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RachaelMar16

Can someone explain to me the infinitive form and how you conjugate this to other forms?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jhann19
jhann19
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The conjugation is, I believe: Léim (I read) Léann tú (You read) Léann sé / sí (He / she reads) Léimid (We read) Léann sibh (You read) Léann siad (They read)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaasiel19615

hi

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeevaV
KeevaV
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she says it like yay-im

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaCeeBeale

Is the "L" silent and replaced with a "Y" sound??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JadeKmecik

What is the single version of the verb as in to read. The unconjugated version of read. I'm trying to figure out the entire conjugation chart. Duolingo should give a word bank of words you are learning and their meanings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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That would be léigh, I think: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/l%C3%A9igh#Verb

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaasiel19615

hi

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hechanx

How would I say "I read a book." in Irish?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverCasserley

Léim leabhar. - I read a book. Léimid leabhair. -we read books. Léim an leabhar - I read the book.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaasiel19615

hi bb

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amayzingam

So would the root of "léim" be "lé"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

The root is 'léigh', 'to read'. Many - if not most - verbs in Irish have one of the suffixes 'igh'/'aigh'. Conjugation is mostly just a case of replacing these suffixes with other ones, which uniquely identify the tense (and often, the subject).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amayzingam

Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yummyyendi
yummyyendi
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How is it so that léim means I read and means jump at the same time. How do I tell them apart?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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There are two different verbs - a bit like "to lie (down)" and "to lie (dissemble)" in English.

The dictionary form (the imperative, which we haven't met yet) for "read" is "léigh". The dictionary form for "jump" is "léim" - it ends in what happens to looks like a personal ending.

The past tense (which we haven't met yet either) "I read (yesterday)" is "léigh mé". The past tense form "I jumped" is "léim mé". Yes, all verbs beginning in "l" look the same in the past tense as in the dictionary form/imperative. You'll see why later.

The present tense, "he reads" is léann sé. "I read (regularly, present tense)" is either léann mé or léim. Yes, this looks like the past tense of "jump", but it already contains the "mé". You don't (and can't) add . "I jumped", however, needs "mé": "léim mé".

And "I jump" is "léimim" or "léimeann mé"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrianDavern

dont care !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olivia745050

You should care!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wolfgirl5885

is 'Leim' more commonly used for I read or jump?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It really depends on context. I can't say definitively that one is more common, as they're often used in different contexts. You'll likely never get them confused.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMurray29
JasonMurray29
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I would say 'jump' as that is the only way of saying 'jump' (to my knowledge). However, if you wish to say 'I read', in certain areas the common form would be 'Léigh mé'. To note against this is that reading might be a more common action than jumping

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/faith46
faith46
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Why not "léigh mé ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

'Léigh' is 'to read', or it can be used a command in the imperative. To say 'I read', you must put the verb into the present tense, which is 'léann'. So, you would say 'léann mé', which is often shortened to 'léim'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kyner_A

It said it can be jumped or read what

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnyaMeehan

I thought leabh is to read and leim is to jump

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Read the other message on this topic.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Prof.Laurita

What's the difference between léim and léann mé? Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thekatt08
thekatt08
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I guess there is no difference really. It's like "I'm" and "I am".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brenda_mar

It says read and jump wich one do I follow

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melinda49250

I don't know how to put the accent marks where they belong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ahmeda48

Confused.com at duolinyo . ..lll

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LililotusR

can you say it with out the é ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brendan991556

is there a section that lists verbs?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olaf_B

To me the audio sounds like the words starts with "i" or "y", as in the English "yell" or "yellow". Is that how I should pronounce it? (Sometimes the audio's quality creates mistakes.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

It's like 'lyeyim'. As it is adjacent to a slender vowel, the 'l' becomes slender. Slender 'l' can be pronounced like 'ly'. There is more here: http://angaelmagazine.com/pronunciation/consonants.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olaf_B

Thx.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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This thread is testament to the fabulous job the Caighdeánisers did with their "simplified" orthography :D

So much needless confusion.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nkwk88
nkwk88
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Dive/Jump/Read. Well this one is tough.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrGWallCymraeg

Is the L pronounced? Sounds like "yay-um" but should it sound like "lay-um"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

The closest approximation in English is along the lines of "lyey-im".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrGWallCymraeg

Thank you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pengu1n_2.0

For a second I thought it was Yay-im. My laptop speaker is at an annoying place.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evoyo5

i get soooo confused

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grace419433

I thought she said yam... So thats what I put.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kerrie303174

Léim. I read. Traslation: I read. Oooops wrong??? 6 times in a row....

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nea2010

it could also be i jump

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoahAdkins4

the voice sounds like naim

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mkmab
mkmab
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I am typing I read, but it has twice registering as an incorrect answer.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FruitBat10

Oh dear lord, I am an Irish speaker, using this for vocabulary revision for tests and I accidentally put down to jump ;-;

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kyle326595

Is it pronounced like a y or a weak L

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hectorlqr
hectorlqr
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IPA: l̠ʲeːmʲ

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angela621905

coool i can leim

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babygirl_jay

why are two different things in one word?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Why can "lie" mean both "be horizontal on a surface" and "say something which is not true" in English? Why can "lay" be both the past tense of "lie" (as in lie down on a surface) and the present tense of "lay" (as in lay a cloth on a table)?

Language sometimes works like that. There isn't really a good answer for "why".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babygirl_jay

okay....... thanks?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Maybe I misunderstood you.

I thought you were were complaining that "Léim" can be "I read" or "jump" and were wondering how one word can have two meanings.

But perhaps you were wondering instead how "léim" can contain both "I" and "read" in one word?

That's because verbs in Irish are conjugated - a bit like in Spanish, which I see you have also started learning. The ending changes depending on the subject of the verb.

A bit like how it's "I read" but "he reads" with an -s ending, except that it's not only the "he/she/it" form that gets a separate ending, but all the forms are separate.

So you don't really need to say "I" or "you" any more since the verb ending will tell you what the subject is.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babygirl_jay

oh...... so you mean if it's put in a type of sentence, like "i jumped into the water," it works for that definition? i get it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pranav_spai
pranav_spai
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Sounds awfully similar to Spanish and Portuguese

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edwardroan

hi

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarbyFlannery

what crazyness is this leim means jumped and i read

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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What craziness is it that "polish" is what you do to shoes and "Polish" means from Poland!

Language is ambiguous sometimes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaintMacrina
SaintMacrina
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Why is it jump and read? How are those the same?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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"I read" coincidentally looks like the verbal noun for "jump".

Sometimes unrelated words have the same shape. A bit like "like" in English ("looks like you = looks similar to you" but "I like you = I have good feelings for you").

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sophiedouglas1

hello

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZRaider126

The audio sounds like an 8 year old.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matthewlawless1

omg wat is this mannn

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matthewlawless1

yooooooooooo

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conormurt230

ur mom

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coteyyyy

lingots please

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/K1TT3NZ

How come it sounds like "lame" and means "I read"? There is something sort of sad about that translation; reading is great.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It actually doesn't. This speaker is just using a "learners" dialect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

Do you mean it doesn't sound like 'lame'? I've always pronounced it that way. Maybe you Connacht chancers need a dose of An Caighdeán Oifigiúil, eh? ;)

How would you pronounce it? I really struggle to understand Connacht dialects so I would greatly appreciate your help.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Actually, An Caighdeán is not a spoken standard. Irish has no spoken standard. And using only the sounds in "lame" to describe this word is selling it short. It ignores the slender vowels at the end. If you listen closely to the first part here you'll realize it's not exactly the same as "lame"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

Yeah, I wasn't being serious. I thought you'd pick up on that.

Okay, I thought you meant you would pronounce it completely differently from 'lame'. It's not exactly the same and 'leh(i)m' might be a better way to explain the pronunciation. The difference is less than that between, for example, 'uachtarán' and 'uachtaráin', which is very obvious.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mediterranean

Does the Munster audio pronounce the L differently from the other two audios on that link, or is it my imagination? The other ones, especially the Ulster one, sound like my Catalan "ll" (or Italian "gl") to me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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Your link ([text](url)) doesn't do anything on the app. It needs to be just url to work on the app too.

Here's the pronunciation on Forvo: http://forvo.com/word/l%C3%A9im/#ga

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

I see, which is annoying. That said, I recommend using Forvo only as a last resort, and leaning instead to Teanglann

http://breis.focloir.ie/en/fuaim/l%C3%A9im_pharaisi%C3%BAit

As only one speaker on Forvo, that I know of, is a native one -- BrídÉilís. And several of the others have poor, Anglicized pronunciation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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Thanks for the working link! I find the Munster dialect the easiest to understand. The "L"s sound very close to English "L"s. Ulster "L"s sound like "N"s to me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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For a moment there, I though you were pointing out the incongruity of "lame" meaning "jump"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LililotusR

does anyone know the dozsdfxgchvjbknlm;kmnjibhugvycftdrse

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreaSpoerri

It should be "I jump", anything ending in "M", usually indicates that its an "I" verb

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobKaucher
BobKaucher
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Léimim is the first person singular present of the verb léim (jump). Léim mé is the first person singular past of the the verb léim (jump). The only possible ambiguity would be with the singular imperative form of léim. Léim! (Jump!) as a command or the verbal noun.

4 years ago