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  5. "Tá an bhean sa chuisneoir."

" an bhean sa chuisneoir."

Translation:The woman is in the fridge.

August 26, 2014

60 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryLea11

So, I take it 'cuisneoir' is a feminine noun, taking the h after a definite article. In which case 'sa' implies a definite article. How then you do you say 'in a fridge'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tmcg

i gcuisneoir


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryLea11

Go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Afonsojomfru

What's the difference between "sa" and "i"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Betelgeuse11

Sa is "in the". For example, the woman is in the fridge translates to "Tá an bhean sa chuisneoir". I means "in". For example, the woman is in trouble translates to "Tá an bhean i dtrioblóid"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EavanM

Go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeeWolfMoon

Thank you. That was my confusion. Buuuuttttt... Why isnt your second sentence example - ta an bhean sa i dtriobloid - ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arthur852876

I know this is old, but just in case someone else comes across it, "Ta an bhean sa i dtriobloid" would translate to "The woman is in the in trouble." / sa - "in the", while i - "in"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnDiMarcoNJU

What is the difference between sa and san? To translate it into English, I understand the need for using "the," but it does not use "san." Is it not like de and den?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

san is the form of sa used before a vowel. Similarly, without an article, you use i(n), adding the "n" before a vowel:

i gcuisneoir: in a fridge

in Éirinn: in Ireland

sa chuisneoir: in the fridge

san oíche: in the night

sna Gardaí: in the police force

All the gory details here: http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/i.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pepperwaffle

I am confused what made tá go from has/have to is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueWillow991967

You'll run into this a lot more with other prepositions. "Ta/ ochras orm." = "I'm hungry." Literally, "Hunger is on me." You wear emotions in Irish, so, "Ta/ bro/n orm." = "I'm sorry" because it literally says, "Sorrow is on me." Ta/ isn't exactly "is." It's literally "stands." But "Is" as in "Is cat me/" (I'm a cat.) is the "is the same thing as" kind of "is." Ta/ is the "stands as" kind of "is." (Sorry I've had to put the accent marks after the vowel above, hope you catch my meaning.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Endosymbiosis

Tá = is. Because Irish doesn't have a verb for "to have," they express the idea by saying "(possessed thing) is at (possessor)."

So, for example, if I wanted to say "I have a dog" in Irish, I would say "Tá madra agam." Which literally means "A dog is at me" (Tá = is, madra = a dog, agam = at me).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorenagay

And that explains the truly delightful word order the Irish employ when speaking English. I always thought it was just sheer silliness...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ginagillen

why is there is a woman in the fridge wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NealFisher

Because it's talking about a specific woman being in the fridge - the definite article "an" is present, therefore "There is a woman in the fridge" would be incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ginagillen

thanks that makes sense now


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/themantalope

Can someone please explain why "bean" has lenition in this sentence? Why is it not "Tá an bean sa chuisneoir"? GRMA


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertEddy

noun is lenited when a feminine noun comes after 'an' (unless noun begins with a d, or t, etc.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlegRussia

Is "cuisneoir" a feminine? www.focloir.ie says that it isn't...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertEddy

Sub-discussion here Is about 'bean', not 'cuisneior'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianMcBri7

I got the answer wrong as woman wasn't an option only women


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maggoli

Reminds me of a controversial DC comics issue...

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