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"Jeg er et barn."

Translation:I am a child.

4 years ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lingoingo
lingoingo
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"Barn" is easy for me to remember because it is like Scots "bairn."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sofiadcs
Sofiadcs
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Cool, I never knew! :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeniusJack
GeniusJack
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Kirk, which is Scots for Church, is similar to the Danish Kirke, German Kirch and Dutch Kerk.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Moomingirl
Moomingirl
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...and the Finnish kirkko :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeniusJack
GeniusJack
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And the Icelandic kirkju, and Norwegian Kirke.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lingoingo
lingoingo
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More cognates include, Afrikaans, kerk, Estonian, kirik and Swedish kyrka.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Moomingirl
Moomingirl
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:)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Among the long list of cognates is actually English "church" as well (Old English it was "cirice" but the Cs were pronounced as CH)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qwertylaal
qwertylaal
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"Barn" is also like "Barn" in Norwegian (Bokmål).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/narminas451

or maybe is like "born" in English ))

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NattKullav1
NattKullav1
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No, in English it is also "barn" (dialect of northern England).
"barn" in English came from "bearn" in Old English and "barn" in Old Norse. By the way "born" in English is from the verb "to bear" which is from "beran" in Old English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChasCorbet

you beat me to the draw :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/germanwannabee

It's also like the Swedish "barn."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doedelJan
doedelJan
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It's also really close to the Frisian word: bern.. but then again I if I'm not mistaken Frisian and Danish are closely related

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash2of6
Ash2of6
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I read this, and I was like: (I mutter to myself when I am translating new words) I... am... a .... BARN? What the hell??? Then I realised.... I hadn't translated it yet. :P xD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chucklenuts7
Chucklenuts7
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Don't worry, I'm a barn too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gordon802056

Am I hearing "barn" pronounced with two syllables? I swear I can hear a glottal stop in the middle of the vowel.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlyceGrey

Me too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChasCorbet

and me...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caleb420108

I almost put "I am at a barn" XD

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ella_ibbs

Why isn't it "Jeg er en barn"? I thought "en" was "a"? and "et" was "an"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xneb
Xneb
Mod
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"A" and "an" in English depend on the next letter, not the next word. You can have "an elephant" but then "a big elephant", however in Danish it will be "en elefant" and "en stor elefant". In the same way in English, you can say "a house" but "an impressive house", but in Danish it's "et hus" and "et imponerende hus".

Danish has two genders for nouns and you have to learn the word with the gender (instead of learning "house = hus" learn "a house = et hus", for example). 75% of all nouns are common gender (n-words) while the rest are neuter (t-words). There is no real patterns other than some noun-endings always having the same gender, and in compound nouns, the gender of the noun is pretty much always the gender of the final word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MehrzadYp

I thought en is used for living things. So I'm guessing barn is also an exception? We use et instead of en?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Katie342667

Et is for things that are masculine and feminine (like barn and kvinden) and en is for things without a gender (like ris and mælk) This is most likely right (but then again I may be wrong :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TseDanylo
TseDanylo
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her pronunciation 'barn' soooo cute!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffKroeger

That's pretty rude!

6 months ago