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  5. "Go raibh maith agat."

"Go raibh maith agat."

Translation:Thank you.

August 26, 2014

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jennesy

is there a more literal translation of this phrase?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

Literally it means "[I wish] that there were goodness at you" - in other words, "I wish that you might have goodness". It is a form called the subjunctive which is quite complicated to explain without knowing more basic grammar first!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CormacFinn

If I'm correct it means "There is good before you". Kind of wishing someone has a nice day for being so kind to you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jennesy

thank you! maybe this will help me remember!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/apfelsafteis

I love the niceness oh my goodness


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmhuang89

I am having trouble with this pronunciation, can anyone possibly spell this out phonetically for me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smcgee7

Go riv mah agut. ɡɔ ɾˠɛvʲ mˠah ˈaɡət


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrdubois

so is "-aith" always pronounced is "ah"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BartConnol

Connacht tends to pronounce agat as ut so as mahth ends in h you get maw hut but others might sound the g rendering maw ug ut


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luiz.calheiros

I don't know why, but I heard /'ag.uːt/, can it be possible?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smcgee7

The "ə" is a Mid-central vowel, which does sound similar to a "u" (close back rounded vowel), but from a linguistic standpoint they are considered different. I am sure it depends where in Ireland you are getting the pronunciation from too. "ə": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mid-central_vowel "u": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Close_back_rounded_vowel IPA Vowel Table: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:IPA_chart/table_vowels


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luiz.calheiros

Thank you for replaying. I think I have to work out my vowels.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BartConnol

Some strange difficult sounds are tripthongs... Triple vowels as in feoil meat which many add in a y sound but native speakers say fith owle not fith yole


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BartConnol

Im my experience connaught tend to stress the first syllable in agat rendering AWE gitch others migh say awe GUT mote u than a a but i supposr awe GIT isvpossible. I cant remember hearing it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paddy731202

In Connaught we would use Gura but DL does not accept this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D0BBYISAFREEELF

Is the bh sound in Irish pronounced like a "vv" sound? So, goh rav mah agat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaneMartinDavy

When bh comes at the end of a word its sounds w


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

"When bh comes at the end of a word its sounds w" - in some dialects

Here are a bunch of words ending in bh that are pronounced with a "v" in at least one dialect:
raibh
tarbh
taobh
tiubh
sliabh
luibh
sibh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryCabary

In Spanish, the b and v are interchangeable in their pronunciation as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dandelionmagic

The hints say each word means "that, was/be, good, at you" so "that was/is good of you" i think remembering it this way will work better for me, i like the phrasing better than "thank you" anyways XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleWidhalm

Is there a shortened version of this? "Maith agat" for instance?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christine797526

Why mhaith in Maidin mhaith and maith in Go raibh maith agat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

Lenition and eclipsis have to be caused by something.

maith is an adjective in maidin mhaith, so it agrees with the gender of the noun that it qualifies - maidin is a feminine noun so it's adjective is lenited.

There is nothing in Go raibh maith agat that would cause maith to be lenited.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneNoone1

Go raibh maith agat.

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