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  5. "Itheann na fir."

"Itheann na fir."

Translation:The men eat.

August 26, 2014

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Taras1996

Why the "fir" has sound like "fit"? Are there any rules which explain that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lenaun

So no one can explain why the lady seems to say "fid" insead of "fír"? Please


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grawniglot

I'm more worried about how it seems like they are using an 'r' sound for the 'mn' in 'mna' with a fada over the a.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mollydot

It's her dialect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luckychii_

I heard it like that too. I'm also hearing "ithim". The pronunciations are difficult


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LizGartlan

I could not make what she was saying. Never heard 'fir' pronounced like that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelly-Rose

Love the sound of this sentence. It almost sounds like she's going to break out into song.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PoppyTart2

Lol i was talking when the girl read out the phrase and i thought she said "eating my feet"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rye3317

I cannot unhear her saying eating my feet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helen640630

I've listened and listened even turning up the volume. She says itheann na FID!!!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

She says Itheann na fir. You don't know what a slender r is supposed to sound like (because it doesn't exist in most dialects of English), so you interpret it as a "d" sound.

If she was saying itheann na fid, the ending would sound like the end of Táimid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luiz.calheiros

Some one has commented about "itheann na páistí" that he thought he've heard "ithim". I know why. They are not the same at all, but both end in nasal consonants, [n] and [m] sounds. So try make sure what consonant you're spelling because it can change the subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joan175733

Give your ear time to tune in or attune? need to work my English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DylanMcD123

Your right, For sure. Also, Your first guess was right, it's tune. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gema996416

What does fir mean????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

In Irish, the verb comes first (Verb-Subject-Object). So if itheann na fir means "the men eat", then fir means "men".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CLAIRGolden

Is there any kind of a pronunciation guide for Irish. I listen and listen and just give in, as I am doing this for brain exercise and I am surely getting a lot of that!

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