Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Taitníonn sé liom."

Translation:I enjoy it.

4 years ago

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sigmacharding
sigmacharding
  • 18
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

It shines with me!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dincxjo
dincxjoPlus
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • 422

This seems to be an idiomatic expression, or perhaps the word simply has two meanings. Firstly, it means "to shine", but it can also mean "to be liked":

Taitníonn an pictiúr liom - I like the picture

Taitníonn cailíní liom - I like girls

Thaitin an taispeántas go mór leis - He liked the exhibition very much

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barhiril

So, what's the difference between Taitníonn .... liom and is maith liom? I know that the first one can also mean to enjoy, but are there any other differences?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CelticPyro57

I guess there's a different connotation in it based on what you say. Like, you can say "Is maith liom e" to mean "It is good with me," but that doesn't carry the same level of praise as "Taitnionn se liom" or "It shines with me." If you say something shines with you that sounds a lot better than just "it's good with me," sort of like the difference between saying you like something and you love something.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

You're using an analysis of English to decide what the Irish means - it doesn't really work that way.

taitníonn sé liom if often interpreted as "it pleases me", which is probably a lower level of praise that "I like it", rather than a higher level, and the only people who parse Is maith liom é as "it is good with me" are adult learners who need "literal" translations, even when they are misleading. Is maith liom é really just means "I like it", and if you want to step that up a notch, you change the adjective - is breá liom é or is aoibhinn liom é.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cleon42
cleon42Plus
  • 18
  • 18
  • 13
  • 8
  • 6
  • 3
  • 95

Go raibh maith agat.

That kind of analysis is really helpful.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/razlem
razlem
  • 10
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5

It shines with me = I enjoy it? Not really sure how we're supposed to get to that conclusion...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brighid
Brighid
  • 13
  • 9
  • 8
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Or simply "I like it". It is the most common way of expressing liking or enjoying. So forget about shining unless you are talking about the sun or something :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
  • 23
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 597

I wonder if that expression, "To take a shine to someone" comes from this?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AustinARR

I love the connection you made to the English, even if it's a somewhat outdated saying! Have a lingot. Maith thú!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatMcCat
CatMcCat
  • 23
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 597

Thanks AustinARR! I need all the help I can get trying to remember so many of these words (especially the spelling.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sIxXrR8H

I agree with you - it is a lousy English translation!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenfromMI

It is part of the poetry of the language. I wish Duo would include more literal translations for this reason.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Frankly, I find that attitude disrespectful of the Irish language and of Irish speakers. When an Irish speakers says Taitníonn sé liom, they mean "I enjoy it", they don't mean "it shines with me".

The Irish language deserves to be treated as more than just a bauble to be admired because it uses constructions that English speakers find charming.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenfromMI

You seem to get offended quite easily. Not all Irish speakers agree with you. Watch this video about the poetry of the Irish language. The speaker grew up speaking Irish in the home. He holds a different viewpoint about the poetry of literal translations than you do.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mRIaLSdRMMs

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

I think you misunderstand the message of that TEDx talk. He definitely isn't arguing that it's OK for learner a learner of Irish to write "God's little cow" instead of "ladybird" when translating bóín Dé into English. He talked about how having two languages gives you access to another way of seeing things. He could as easily have told a story about a monolingual Irish speaker, for whom bóín Dé is just a humdrum name for a common insect, being delighted to learn that this is called a "lady-bird" in English, and translating it back into Irish as éan-mná or ban-éan. (Or, if he was learning American English, "ladybug"). He might have gone on to learn that the "lady" is a reference to Mary, and the seven spots on a common ladybird referred to the seven graces and sorrows of the Virgin, and that ban-éan is too crude a translation, and misses the significance of the word in English.

(Indeed, the Russian for "ladybird" also means "God's little cow", so maybe maybe there's a Russian speaker out there who has told that story).

But it's easier to tell that story to an English speaking audience by telling them how poetic the Irish (and Russian) phrase sounds when translated literally into English.

Learning about how these kinds of things are expressed in other languages is indeed one of the great things about learning a language. But it doesn't mean that it's OK to use literal translations because they're cuter than the actual workaday translations (that may be just as fascinating, if we actually paid attention to them).

The speaker's example of tá bláth bán ar garraí an iascaire isn't just a example of poetic language - in his own words, it connects him with his landscape, because the sea is the fisherman's garden, and white flower's might look attractive, and that even on land, they might be a weed that hinders the work of the farmer. (I'll also note that he didn't quite translate that line literally).

By all means learn what the Irish for Jellyfish "literally" means, but don't make the mistake of translating it back into English as "seal snot".

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenfromMI

"I think you misunderstand the message of that TEDx talk. He definitely isn't arguing that it's OK for learner a learner of Irish to write "God's little cow" instead of "ladybird" when translating bóín Dé into English. "

I wasn't arguing that people should. You misunderstand me.

Although, interestingly, there is an old American expression for liking something that may have come from Irish tradition...Most Americans would understand the expression He/She "took a shine to it."

Thanks for listening to the video.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

It is part of the poetry of the language. I wish Duo would include more literal translations for this reason.

There is plenty of room in the discussions for people to point out interesting aspects of literal translations, whether to help explain things, or because they help people to remember them, or to highlight examples of Hiberno-English that have come directly from Irish, or just because they are "cute". But Duolingo's job is to teach Irish as a working language, and it shouldn't accept literal translations just because they sound more poetic than the humdrum translations that people actually use in the daily lives.

People don't ask that the French, Italian or Spanish course accept more poetic literal translations. While the vast majority of the people learning Irish here don't actually need the language, it still deserves to be treated as a practical working language, not some pretty bauble that is only valued for its poetry. It should be valued for its poetry in addition to its value as a practical language.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
AnCatDubh
  • 17
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1380

Is it just me or is the second t not pronounced in the new audio?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/torowan
torowan
  • 23
  • 18
  • 11
  • 11
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2
  • 45

I don't hear it pronounced - from your asking, I infer it is supposed to be?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

It's not "supposed to be", in that native speakers from Conancht and Munster don't pronounce it, but if you were just reading the text, there is no obvious grammatical reason to expect that it wouldn't be pronounced.

This is just one of those examples where the "normal" pronunciation doesn't quite match the written word, because when spoken at a normal cadence, the second t is naturally elided - you can sound it, but it takes slightly less effort to skip over it.

(Note that the example above is for taitneamh rather than taitníonn, but it's the same process).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buachaill

he shines like me XD soo wrong, an rud bocht!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bellatrix86

I see that I like you is Taitníonn tú liom.
What about the other way around: You like me? Is it Taitním leat?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joeslugs
Joeslugs
  • 15
  • 13
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3

Can someone give me the root of this verb like you would find in a dictionary? I can't seem to find it online.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeInCalif
LeeInCalif
  • 24
  • 9
  • 4
  • 885

Here's the Fócloir.ie entry for "like" - http://www.focloir.ie/en/dictionary/ei/like. The first definition is for the verb "to like" (as in "be fond of"). The dictionary gives "taitin le" as one of the translations. Click on "PhrV" (to the right of "taitin le"), then click on "taitin" in the small box that pops up. You'll get a large box with the full conjugation of the verb in all tenses/moods.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joeslugs
Joeslugs
  • 15
  • 13
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3

Go raibh maith agat!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linzerbinzer

I am pretty sure it is taitín.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joeslugs
Joeslugs
  • 15
  • 13
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3

Thank you. I'm trying to get better at figuring out roots from the stem versions given the kind of conjugation (1st or 2nd) but it is still difficult...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

That's one for Aileen alright !!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter559873

Why is se (acute) it and not he?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

It could be "him", but you're more likely to be saying "I enjoy it" than "I enjoy him".

(Strictly speaking it is "he/it shines with me", but the equivalent expression in English is "I enjoy him/it").

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Admrl
Admrl
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 2

Why for 1. person is used verb in form for 3. person?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

liom is the first person form in this sentence. The idiom Taitníonn X le Y means "Y enjoys X"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Admrl
Admrl
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 2

Go raibh maith agat!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonanD89

This never came up in any of the sections I've done but I'm getting it in strengthening. Why's that? I got the word taitnionn but only to mean shines.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angelal48

Should this translation not mean - "He likes me"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

No, as explained in a number of the posts above, the phrasal verb "taitin le" is used for "like".

"taitníonn sé", without the "le", means "he shines", and the addition of the "le" changes the meaning completely, it doesn't just specify what he is shining, or shining at.

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fgb/taitin

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angelal48

Go raibh maith agat.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarthaA852
MarthaA852
  • 25
  • 22
  • 20
  • 17
  • 49

Se means he. M.M.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arthur339941

Before puberty the language machine in an individual's brain still functions and they can learn any language the same way they learned their first native language, by hearing, repeating and memorizing and the unconscious mind sorts out the grammar without the individual being aware of any of that side of things. A baby doesn't need to know about eclipsis, lenition, broad and slender orthographical rules, conjugations or declensions. After puberty this innate language machine closes down and older individuals have to try and use their conscious logical faculties to acquire language. This is when a new phrase such as "Taitníonn sé liom. " is extremely difficult and annoying for the adult learner. "Taitníonn sé" looks for all the world like the 3rd person present tense of a verb "tait????" followed by its subject "sé" meaning "he". "liom" looks suspiciously like the 1st person singular present form of another verb "li???" but probably isn't. The whole thing turns out to be an idiom and as such impossible to deduce a meaning from logically. It just has to learnt as an idiomatic expression. Nothing wrong with that per se, all languages have such constructions (Es gefaellt mir). What is wrong is the idea of using such an idiomatic construction in the very first introduction to Irish present tense verb forms. Keep idioms for a separate lesson where the explanation is: Learn these phrases as you find them. Don't try to analyze them.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vincent215561
Vincent215561
  • 15
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11

Yet analyzing them in detail is the best way to memorize them and you often learn a lot about how the language works. So no, i'd advise quite the opposite: certainly don't just learn them by heart...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/baileyjmxlt

What happened to "Is maith liom é", why wouldn't you just use that?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeLynch7

Should 'it pleases me' be accepted?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lamplighters

I'm a little confused. Wouldn't "Taitnionn sé" be "he shines"? Why wouldn't this read "I enjoy him", rather than "I enjoy it"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

It might be less confusing to read it as "it/he pleases me" with "it/he" is the subject in both the Irish and the English sentences (though with liom rather than as the object).

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lamplighters

Actually, that totally makes sense. Thanks so much for the help! :D

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CelticPyro57

Wait, so the word for "shine" is used to mean "enjoy?" Or rather, "I enjoy it" literally translates to "It shines with me" I love that!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenfromMI

There is an old American expression about "taking a shine to it" It means about the same thing.

2 weeks ago