"Tá tú."

Translation:You are.

4 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/carolineab3

Tá is always pronounced taw because of the á. The fada makes á sound like aw.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chollada78

Just wondering, if you don't have a keyboard that allows an apostrophe on top of a letter than would that mean that you got the question wrong???

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ag3n7_z3r0
ag3n7_z3r0
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But you can always click on the special character buttons below the answer box.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KathyWylde

How?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ag3n7_z3r0
ag3n7_z3r0
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If you are using a computer, there should be a box with all the special characters specific to the language below the answer box.

If you are using a smart phone, most phone are set up so that if you press and hold a letter, all the variations will come up (Example: [e] --> é è ê ë) and you can slide your finger to select the one you want.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/viraghagota2

Same with a tablet

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KathyWylde

No but it is really annoying

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Juniper_Jaye

I've come to realize that with the vowels, if it has the fada (?) above it, it sounds like the Japanese "aw (a), ee (i), oo (u), eh (e), and oh (o)." Well..so far at least, lol.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hespith
hespith
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you're mostly right, but é would actually be pronounced like eh/ay/nay

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThatOneKidJosh

If this is "You are", what is "Are you?".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexinIreland
alexinIreland
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"Are you?" is "An bhfuil tú?". I know it seems strange, but this is because "bí" (to be) is an irregular verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThatOneKidJosh

Cool, but I'm very confused. :(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magrise
magrise
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You are probably just confused by the word order. Just remember in Irish the word order is verb + subject for sentences and questions alike. It is not like many other languages where changing the word order creates a question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chollada78

Same here. But this is an awesome language - and challenging. Plus the app is awesome

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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For most verbs, to ask a question you put "an" at the beginning of the sentence, but it causes some changes to the verb, so I think that will be in a later lesson. Here's an example anyway: Tuigim (tig'm) = I understand An dtuigeann tú? (uh dig'n too) Do you understand? There's a pattern, and it's really not complicated. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/craaash80
craaash80
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"All the things she said..."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LouMimzy1
LouMimzy1
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This took me a second lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mattogucci

Why is tá here pronounced "taw" like in English taught, but in tá sé it sounds like English "toe"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/james301195

I agree ,i wonder why

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deserttitan

The 't' in 'tá' sounds broad. But the 't' in 'tú' here sounds slender. Am I doing it wrong? Shouldn't 'tú' be broad?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

For both Connacht and Ulster Irish, a slender t sounds more like "ch" than "t" - by that standard both of the ts in this exercise are clearly broad.

Munster Irish doesn't tend to slenderize consonants to the same extent as Ulster does, so, for example, the initial t in teacht is quite different in Munster and Ulster, but the slender Munster t is still noticeably more slender than the t in in this exercise.

I used teacht as an example because it's a very common word that most people would be familiar with, but to get an idea what with a slender t would sound like, listen to tiús

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matthewA.4

Isnt tú spanish for you as well?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MSaCPA
MSaCPA
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If "Tá tú." is "You are.", then what is "You have."?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simon_S.

I am a beginner but as far as I understand, there's no colloquial way to say "you have", you need to say "<Object> belongs to you", which would be "Tá <object> agat" in Irish, if I remember correctly

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

There is no verb in Irish that is the direct translation of the English verb "have", but there absolutely is a colloquial way to say "you have". That way, is, as you say "tá <object> agat", but it does not mean "<object> belongs to you".

The "literal" translation of "tá <object> agat" is "<object> is at you", but it will be clearly be understood as "you have <object>" even though "tá <object> ag an doras" will clearly be understood as "there is an <object> at the door".

"<object> belongs to you" is another structure in English that doesn't have a direct translation - "Is leatsa an <object>" would be the usual translation in Irish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simon_S.

Thanks for the clarification :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Richard367480

Yay i got it right. Im part irsh thats why im learning irsh and im going to ireland soon.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grace419433

Good for you! I hope you have fun! Send me a postcard... I kid ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PauBofill
PauBofill
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Can someone show me the hole conjugation of the verb to be in Irish? It's just a bit complicated... ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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Part of the complication lies in that there are two verbs.

http://www.verbix.com/webverbix/go.php?D1=30T1=t%C3%A1H1=130 Tá, which refers to the present condition of something: Tá mé ar meisce (I am drunk)

and https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/is#Irish (Look under related terms, Verbix' 'Go' button isn't responding) Is, which refers to an inherent state: Is bean mé (I am a woman)

I'm only vaguely aware of this myself so this might not be a great explanation. I think it's similar to the Spanish Ser and Estar.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PauBofill
PauBofill
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Oh okay, thanks. I found this webpage where it explains this... www.irishgaelictranslator.com/articles/grammar/ta-and-is-the-to-be-verbs/ So what it says is that TÁ/BÍ is what in Castilian, Catalan, Portuguese and Italian is ESTAR/STARE and IS is what it's SER/ÉSSER/ESSERE. Since I'm a native catalan speaker it'll be easier for me...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WithFeeling

Question: Duolingo lists both "Tá tú" and "Tá sibh" as "you are".. Is this correct, and if so, in what instances do you use each?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexinIreland
alexinIreland
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Yes, both answers are indeed correct :) Irish has a different form of "you" for singular and plural:

  • Tá tú -> You are (singular, so you are addressing one person)
  • Tá sibh -> You are (plural, so you are addressing more than one person. It can also be translated as "you all", "you guys", "y'all", "ye", etc. depending on your local dialect)
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hannah7K

it sounds like take two. right? but i find it helpful that the a is before the u. otherwise i'd be lost...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hannah7K

why you are?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SanctMinimalicen
SanctMinimalicen
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A dialectical synthetic variant of this is "táir." You just may encounter it in certain parts of the country, particularly in parts of Munster.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UrsusFaerius

The 't' sounds came out more like 'c' sounds on my speakers

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdaHayes

I love saying this

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TwinTip
TwinTipPlus
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In Portuguese "Tú tá" (informal dialect) means "You are" as well

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thesupbrodude

i'm confused

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrunAnimas
BrunAnimas
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Túis exactly as in spanish

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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If I was awkward here and translated this sentence as Yes. Would I be correct? Innocent question.

3 years ago
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