Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Bhur n-úll."

Translation:Your apple.

4 years ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/NSullivanDuo
NSullivanDuo
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Why do we add the "n-" before 'úll'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heartosay

It comes after "bhur" (your pl.), "ár" (our) or "a" (their). Just a way of denoting the plural possessive, I guess.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulKerins
PaulKerins
  • 16
  • 10
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2

Is that the same for all nouns or are there different rules?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heartosay

It will take an eclipsis (urú) in any event. If the noun begins with a vowel, the urú will be an "n" at the beginning of the word.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
  • 22
  • 14
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3

bhur, ár, and a (meaing their) cause eclipsis. Eclipsis affects a word starting with a vowel by prefixing that n- Same rule that gives you bhur bportán.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michelleplus8

I have heard mentioned here that the audio is not exactly right. This page (http://angaelmagazine.com/pronunciation/consonants.htm) says that a broad bh should be pronounced like a W. So should "bhur" be "wur" rather than "vur"? And is it just a matter of different dialects, or is she actually saying it wrong (or am I wrong)?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
  • 22
  • 14
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3

I generally follow the guideline you mention (v with a slender vowel, w with a broad vowel), but a friend of mine (native speaker + PhD in Irish) says them all as v, so when he says ana-mhaith, it sounds like "ahnuhvah' I think it's a dialect thing. You can go to focloir.com and listen to pronunciations from three different regions for a lot of words

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnCushma
JohnCushma
  • 11
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

According to foclóir.ie, it is pronounced "wur" in Ulster and Connacht and pronounced "vur" in Munster dialect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michelleplus8

Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IuileanMGabhann

Slender v/bh/mh is always a ‘v’, whereas broad v/bh/mh is in many dialects more like a ‘w’, although a ‘v’ also occurs. It all depends on the dialect. Keep in mind that even speakers who have a ‘v’ for both, like with all consonants, make a distinction between slender and broad ‘v’ (sadly, this is completely inaudible in the audio files).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fearghal325822

The dialect that is being usrd hete is Connacht dialect.They pronounce words very differently thete and they havr a habit of not pronouncing letters within a word..Therefore it becomes very difficult to decipher what is being said.Personally I think it was a poor choice of accent and dialect for this app.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fearghal325822

Sorry for the typos btw

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crobinson5

It really just depends on the dialect. I have a real messed up dialect because im learning from my home provinxe and friends from other provinces but i generally use v. I guess its also kinda like v in some languages is w and w is v. Like my friend from latvia instead of pronouncing wine like we would, she'd say vine because of her native tongue.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ruamac
ruamac
  • 11
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

For anyone who's having difficulty with the different lenitions and eclipses, I recommend learning this rote:

mo/my, do/your (sl.)r, a/his - aspirate consonants a/her - puts 'h' before a vowel ar/are, bhur/your (pl.), a/their - eclipse consonants and put 'n-' before a vowel

Once you've learned it off you'll have to run through it each time you have to decide which to use but it will eventually start to come natural to you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jgierbo2
jgierbo2
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

is there anything special in the pronunciation of the 'n-'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1488

There shouldn’t be.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bastianacook

what is the difference between D'ull and Bhur n-ull?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IuileanMGabhann

In English, they would both translate as “your apple”, however ‘do’ corrisponds to ‘tú’, which is used when referring to a single person, while ‘bhúr’ corresponds to ‘sibh’, which is used in reference to multiple persons (compare to the difference between ‘I’ and ‘we’).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bastianacook

so basically D'ull is singular and N-ull is plural?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IuileanMGabhann

The possessor is singular or plural depending on the form, indeed, the apple is always singular (plural would be ‘úlla’). Also, the plural possessor form is “bhúr n-úll”, “bhúr” being the actual pronoun, which triggers eclipsis of the following noun. The ‘n-’ at the beginning of ‘úll’ is just what happens to words beginning with a vowel when they are eclipsed.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bastianacook

okay. thank you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kenan820
kenan820
  • 25
  • 16
  • 15
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 5

I'm hearing her say "var" like English "far" rather than "vur" like English "fur". Is my hearing off and/or am I expecting to hear the wrong sound?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Torbuntu
Torbuntu
  • 25
  • 23
  • 15
  • 15
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1325

It sounds almost more like "v uh r" the 'uh' being the same as the 'u' in "cut" (in the English I speak, anyway). It is either due to the U being a short vowel (with no accent) or a dialectal thing. I would expect the long U too, but it may be that it is just short and so pronounced short. Others' thoughts?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moloughl
moloughl
  • 23
  • 15
  • 409

Same here, I heard bharr n-úll but I was forewarned from an earlier question where she said ór na úll for ár n-úll so I got this one right but the earlier one completely wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IJR3
IJR3
  • 8
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2

why is n- used instead of n'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
  • 22
  • 14
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3

The - shows that the n isn't really a part of the base word. Here's an example:
a nathair = his/her/their snake
a n-athair = their father

Remember that an initial n doesn't change its spelling, so you need context to tell what a means.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1685

The question was why a hyphen instead of an apostrophe.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gp6am
Gp6am
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25

I have the same question and would love to have a good answer. Is the apostrophe used to indicate there is a missing a letter that has been dropped, and the hyphen to show the hyphenated letter has been added?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1685

https://www.duolingo.com/ruamac
ruamac
  • 11
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Basically, yes. An apostrophe is used to show a contraction of a word. For instance when using 'do' or 'mo' before a vowel. So, if you want to say, 'Your apple,' you'll say, 'd'úll', or for 'my orange,' you'll say, 'm'oráiste.'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1685

That's just how they spell it. https://www.duolingo.com/skill/ga/Possessives

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonfitz1

why would you have your as plural and apple as singular?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1685

Because here it's multiple people and a single apple.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 3

I don't hear the lenition in this one; I mean that it sounds like "bur" rather than "bhur". Am I crazy?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ruamac
ruamac
  • 11
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

No, you're not crazy - the pronunciation on this file does sound closer to a 'b' than a 'w' sound. However, this isn't an example of lenition. The word for 'your plural' is 'bhur'. The 'h' is always there and not just as part of mutation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fearghal325822

The woman who is saying the words sounds like she is from Connacht.They have a very different dialect there in which they don't tend to pronounce words as they should be pronounced. Connacht speakers also tend to miss out letters in a word thus shortening the word and making it difficult to understand what they are saying.I think they made a poor choice of speaker on the app.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thinker.ie
Thinker.ie
  • 14
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 40

Important Pronunciation to note: Bhur - can be pronounced - wuhr (were) or - vuhr (Munster Irish) - commonly taught in schools.

Munster Irish is generally easier to follow and clearer to understand (Not the dialect of the speaker in Duolingo's audio).

But often standard Irish (or at least the Irish I learnt in school) refers to other dialects for pronunciation of specific words. e.g. anseo - on-suh - Munster Irish - on-shuh - Everywhere else (e.g. Connaught) - therefore common pronunciation - also follows broad/slender rules.

Connaught Irish is challenging, even for those who learnt Irish in school. As elision and changed vowel sounds occur frequently.

In Munster Irish, the fada provides clarity in pronunciation. - a fada = t(a) - aw sound - (awe) - i fada = s(i) - ee sound - (be) - e fada = s(e) - ay sound - (way) These sounds don't dominate in Connaught Irish, particularly noticeable in their pronunciation of subject and object pronouns, but impacts the entirety of its spoken dialect.

1 month ago