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https://www.duolingo.com/bill.santagata

How advanced does this get, particularly vocab?

First day on DuoLingo, so apologies if this is an obvious question. I already speak French fluently and Spanish proficiently. I definitely know all of the grammatical concepts of these languages. What I need is advanced vocabulary practice. Does DuoLingo cater to this need?

Additionally, something I like to see: it would be great if DuoLingo could crawl short stories, poems, etc. (in the public domain) as well as news stories and provide them to users that match their vocabulary level. Users could highlight words they don't know, which can be recorded and put into DuoLingo's rotation so they can practice them.

4 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Hdn2000
Hdn2000
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Hello there, bill.santagata!

First of all, welcome to our wonderful community of language learners. I'm sure you'll find what you're looking for here. :)

On your main question, the vocabulary varies by the language you're studying. Some courses may focus more on different forms of the same word rather than an entirely new bank of vocabulary all together. Another thing to keep in mind is that Duolingo is estimated to bring you to an A2/B1 level (Late Beginner or Beginning Intermediate) according to the Common European Framework. Vocabulary will be given to you according to your level, and will gradually progress to a harder level. Immersion is great for translating articles using vocabulary that you would commonly find in authentic texts.

Since you claim to be fluent in both French and Spanish, you might want to think about mostly practicing in Immersion, due to the articles usually being of a more advanced level than what the tree has to offer.

I hope this answered your question, and I hope you stay with us here on Duolingo! :)

Happy language learning, ˜Hdn

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bill.santagata

Thanks...tried some of the translations. I was a bit confused: are you translating to or from the target language?

Rote translations are a very dry way to learn, in my opinion. I like the idea of how the site keeps track of the spaced repetition needed to retain vocabulary, with points and medals and all that to keep you motivated and track your progress. Maybe I'll try duolingo with Italian.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hdn2000
Hdn2000
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You can always change the language you're learning from in Immersion. There's a button on the top right that you can use to switch. If you're passionate about learning Italian, go ahead. The "gamified" experience in Duolingo is certainly well-paced and great for motivation. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellistea

As far as I can tell, NO. However, if you go into the immersion part where you are translating documents, you may get some of what you're seeking. You may do better with another methodology, but I'll let some more experienced duolingo folks chirp in.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffA2
JeffA2
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It sounds like you should check out Bliu Bliu. It does exactly what you are asking about. It picks out content from public domain sources -- news, websites, literature, jokes -- and you tell it which words you understand and which you don't. As you go along it gets smarter and tries to offer you sources that you can mostly understand, but that give some new words. It also allows you to choose to drill on particular words.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deguo
deguo
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If you're looking for advanced vocabulary, I would use Duolingo's Immersion section, as well as Memrise (another website). It also wouldn't hurt to add another language to the mix!

4 years ago