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  5. "An bhfuil do chat tuirseach?"

"An bhfuil do chat tuirseach?"

Translation:Is your cat tired?

August 26, 2014

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daraghlol

Another way of saying I'm tired is "Tá tuirse orm"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Feirsteax

Would "Tá mé tuirseach" work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soupandbread

Codlaíonn mo chat ó dhubh go dubh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nate_J

Is "black to black" an idiomatic expression equivalent to something like "night and day" in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soupandbread

Yeah, it's an idiomatic expression meaning 'all day' or 'from dawn till dusk'. Another idiomatic expression using 'dubh' is 'dubh le daoine' meaning 'crowded' or 'packed with people'. For example: bhí an áit dubh le daoine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

A phrase that is also commonly used in English in Ireland, though it doesn't travel well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/proinsias123

Does dubh dóite count as an idiomatic expression? I have it written down that it means "sick and tired".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soupandbread

You're right, it means 'sick and tired in the 'fed up' sense. Ó dónaill translates 'tá mé dubh dóite de' as 'I am heartily sick of it'. It seems one use of 'dubh' is to intensify a statement in the way 'downright' would in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nate_J

Great info, thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Taurendil

Codleann mo cat gach seicíod. (?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haymuisheen

Should be "an bhfuil tuirseach ar do chat?" - higher leaving certificate Irish 90's


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

You would have failed with that example - that construction requires a noun, tuirse - an bhfuil tuirse ar do chat?

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