1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Irish
  4. >
  5. "My children"

"My children"

Translation:Mo chlann

August 26, 2014

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talideon

For the multiple choice question, the term 'cuid' means 'a portion', thus 'mo chuid páistí' = 'my portion of children'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seamus747

I think it very unfair that 'mo chuid páistí' is included as an option here as 'cuid' has not been taught yet as far as I can recall.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talideon

I'm in two minds about that. I can understand how it might seem unfair, but a dictionary is only a few clicks away at most. Also, failing a question or running out of hearts isn't a bad thing, in spite of how it might feel, as it gets you to go back over the lesson, which re-enforces the learned vocabulary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seamus747

Concerning going back over the lesson and re-enforcing learned vocabulary, I entirely agree. But my point is that "cuid" has not been taught previously in this or any other lesson. So I think it is quite unreasonable to include it as an option here, particularly a correct option which will inevitably lose someone with no previous Irish learning a heart. Fairness is key to maintaining the integrity of the course and a learner's enthusiasm for it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talideon

That works only up to a point. At some point, people have to learn to cope with encountering words they've never encountered before. Also, you should have a dictionary close by or in another tab for when you do encounter an unfamiliar word, and there are plenty of those online for Irish already, including the excellent focloir.ie: http://breis.focloir.ie/en


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

I definitely agree that such a point should come. In no other language I have ever studied, including the other three I am doing on Duolingo, has it ever come after 30 days.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EavanM

I looked up cuid in breis.focloir.ie, and it did not help me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

I would have to disagree with you there. With its lenition, eclipsis, and whatever the hell else it has, learning how to look up something in Irish is as much a separate skill as learning how to look up something in Chinese (something that, at the moment, since I have not been taught the former, I find much easier to do). As to losing hearts, that is not the issue. Being constantly asked to do something one could not possibly do is like being taken on a snipe hunt as a child--a meaningless trick. Perhaps it is simply my distaste for the immersion method of language pedagogy. I am of a generation that was taught languages before we were asked to translate them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talideon

Your issue is with recognising initial lenition. Here's a hint: if you see bp, gc, dt, mb, nd, ng, mh, th, ph, sh, dh, gh, ch, bh, mh, or ts at the beginning of a word, it's always an initial mutation. Always. There are no circumstances in which this isn't the case. You always look up the word without the mutation. With 'chuid', the unlenited form is 'cuid', and that's what you'd look up.

The lessons on initial mutations should mention that in their grammar notes, if they don't already do so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Here's a hint: if you see bp, gc, dt, mb, nd, ng, mh, th, ph, sh, dh, gh, ch, bh, mh, or ts at the beginning of a word, it's always an initial mutation. Always. There are no circumstances in which this isn't the case. You always look up the word without the mutation.

That’s not always the case; for example, the preposition chun does not have an unmutated version *cun. (Cun is a word that is unrelated to chun.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talideon

When it comes to things like initial mutation and its grammatical effect, sure. However, I'm referring purely to the introduction of vocabulary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

The first time I saw it, cuid was lenited. I cannot for the life of me find any verb in an Irish dictionary. I do not seem to have this difficulty with English, French, German, Hungarian, Russian, Czech, Japanese, Latin, Greek, Dutch, Danish, Portuguese, Italian, or Polish, though those are the only languages in which I often find myself looking up words. I may just not be very good at using dictionaries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RozieToez

I never got this in a lesson, ever. This question, however, came up in a review. How is it useful in a review of old material, if I'm being derailed by new material? I'm doing review deliberately because the old material needs it, and because I do not feel ready for new material yet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Which implies that you're going to have more children.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Is this just something that can always be included before a plural, e.g. my portion of the cats, my portion of the books?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talideon

Well, there are a lot it'd sound odd in front of, but you can use it with plenty of other nouns. For instance, the typical way of saying 'my hair' would be 'mo chuid gruaige', 'my money' would be 'mo chuid airgid', 'my clothes' can be 'mo chuid éadaí'.

It's used with stuff that everybody has to refer to your 'share' of it. You wouldn't use it with anything you inherently own, such as body parts or the like though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Thanks so much for the help. One last question about it, then. Can it also be used for something not countable, like "mo chuid uisce" or "mo chuid ris"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talideon

They can be divided up and they're not inalienable possessions, so yeah, you can do that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyHaich

Does "clann" mean children and family? I haven't heard it used in this way before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

My pocket dictionary gives “children, offspring; race, descendants; followers” for clann.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kateleen.carroll

Doesn't chlann mean family and páistí is children


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lizzie668414

Mo pháistí is the correct translation of my children. Mó chlann is my family.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lizzie668414

Autocorrect error there. I wrote "mo chlann".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1454

Here's a link to the dictionary definition of clann:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1010201018

Why is Mo paisti incorrect, for in the lessons before paisti transleted into children and mo into my? Why is chuid here necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1010201018

Wait it would it have to be mo phaisti to be correct?

But why do you suddenly introduce chuid in a lesson on the app where there is no explanation instead of introducing it before? I want to learn irish not guess and hope to get it right to get point.. !?

Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.