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"Briseann sí an t-aláram."

Translation:She breaks the alarm.

4 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MagAonghusa
MagAonghusa
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does this mean she actually destroys the clock or that she turns the alarm off?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexinIreland
alexinIreland
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Option 1 ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarperMacDonald

Sounds like a reasonable action.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pixiwix
Pixiwix
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either way...serves the same purpose. :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Allesgut21
Allesgut21
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Guess she's not a morning person =P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snakewisperer

I think we've all been there before.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liaagatha

Tuigim

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LittleArtist2014

What is the "t-" for before the word "aláram"? Why do some nouns have these and others don't?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berckoise
Berckoise
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If a masculine noun begins with a vowel a t- is placed before it e.g. an t-am, an áit, an t-uisce - now you've just got to figure out which nouns are masculine!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjkuecker1965

She must have had a right night of it. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eggplant42

Sounds like my morning

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanHakam

Why is this not "she breaks the alarm clock"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Because it doesn't contain the word clog.

Briseann sí an clog aláraim - "She breaks the alarm clock"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gregory743155

focloir.ie does seem to list "alarm clock" as one meaning of aláram. Probably, as in English, the context would indicate that you mean the alarm-clock when you refer to it as the alarm. But when the context is not so clear, it's better to stick to clog aláraim.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carrouselwriter

Has someone been spying on me? XD

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Glamboro

I like her already

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLea11
MaryLea11
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Don't we all.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Sir9
Mr.Sir9
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is é seo dom gach maidin

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidCarver
DavidCarver
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What does this sentence mean?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Just what it states — the thing that she breaks is the alarm. (There’s no idiom hiding there.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JrgenZirak
JrgenZirak
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How can one break an alarm? Since above is stated it doesn't say alarm clock and it isn't supposed to be an idiom, I do not get it. How can you break something immaterial and not mean it metaphorically? Does alarm equal alarm clock after all but not say so?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeretBraun
MeretBraun
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Exactly what I was wondering too

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gregory743155

The clock still tells the time but the alarm doesn't work any more.

4 weeks ago