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"Ithim glasraí agus anlann."

Translation:I eat vegetables and sauce.

4 years ago

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/buachaill

-with my Sunday roast... mmm...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/il_piccione

I used "with" and was marked wrong. Is this a glitch, or is there another word for "with"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

"glasraí le (h)anlann" would be vegetables with sauce.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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A prefixed H would be needed for anlann because it follows le and it starts with a vowel — glasraí le hanlann.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It doesn't prefix in Connacht Irish, which is honestly what I'm most used to.

See here.

Also, page 97 of Learning Irish

Le 'with' prefixes an h (which is normally not pronounced). So, yes, I should've written it. But it's not pronounced in the dialect anyway.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/K9LVR
K9LVR
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the word duo was looking for was "and".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cesar.gera
cesar.gera
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it refused "a sauce"?! should I report? ANLANN is allowed to mean a sauce, right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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It can do, but it doesn't make much sense to translate it as 'a sauce' here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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still doesn't accept it (27/02/15). I reported it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Soph609900

I eat vegetables and sadness.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John-cross

I wrote 'I am eating...' and was marked wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PALewis88
PALewis88
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Someone mentioned that "I eat..." and "I am eating..." are different in Irish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mimi72129

It's different in American English conceptually(?). I eat fruit. I am eating fruit. Present and present present? Yeah, I'm trying to learn a new (to me) language and I can't explain my native language. It can only get better from here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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“Present present” is normally referred to as “present progressive”.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OwlAdorer

"I am eating" would be "táim ag ithe"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mimi72129

Cheese anlann!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/john132010

Greens is a more literal translation

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nmawe

There are vegetables that aren't green: as Béarla, "greens" is over-specific. As gaeilge phrases shouldn't be taken for their literal meaning any more than English phrases should.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John787925

This seems to differ by dialect. In my (Southern British) dialect I wouldn't really bat an eyelid at someone referring to e.g. carrots as "greens" unless I was trying to be a smart-arse.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2mhnkzrc
2mhnkzrc
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I would think of the greens as being the leaves of the carrots.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kami916645

Yeah, I tried that and it was not accepted. <sigh>

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreaMaryG
AndreaMaryG
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why can I not write veggies it is the same thing

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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See the reply to polabb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

Old Irish delicacy. Vegetables and sauce. Who needs potatoes and meat ??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

Lovely jubbly !!.A lovely big broccoli and a dollop of sauce Sunday dinner for a feoilseantoir ???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CoolStuffYT
CoolStuffYT
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why doesn't I eat sauce and vegetables work??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CoolStuffYT
CoolStuffYT
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Why does "I eat sauce and vegetables" not work? COME ON DUO!!!!!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Because "sauce" isn't the English for glasraí and "vegetables" isn't the English for anlann.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Noreen52830

I said im eating veg and sause and marked it wrong!!!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
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"I eat" and "I am eating" are different in Irish; "veg" is a shortened/slang term; "sauce" isn't spelled that way. The first will definitely get you marked wrong, the latter two might as well.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

"I eat" and "I am eating" are different in English too, though apparently some non-English speakers have trouble with this, because other languages don't differentiate between the simple present and the present progressive in this way.

"I eat" - "Ithim"
"I am eating" - "Táim ag ithe"

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2mhnkzrc
2mhnkzrc
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I eat vegetables and sauce, but not together. Never together.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffFoster14
JeffFoster14
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Hollandaise!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noelmorrissey

the word soup is also called anlann in irish

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

The Irish for soup is "anraith", not "anlann".

http://www.focloir.ie/en/dictionary/ei/soup

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grace419433

As long as the sauce is ranch... I LOVE RANCH!!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackthebiotic

Why can't it be 'veggies'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Because “veggies” is a nickname and glasraí isn’t.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Is there a nickname in Irish for glasraí?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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If there are any, I don’t know what they are.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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So, we should translate "glasraí" as "vegetables", but should we translate "greens" (when referring to vegetables), "veggies" and "vegetables" as "glasraí"?

Added in response to scilling's answer below:

I am betting that "glasraí" is short enough that they didn't feel the need to shorten it, but we just hate to use 3 syllables if we don't have to and "veggies" became a common replacement for "vegetables". I still feel that it is used more by children or when talking to children. If there is no nickname in Irish, then we must translate "veggies" to "vegetables" and therefore to "glasraí". At the same time, I understand not accepting all the nicknames back from an original word. Imagine requiring doggy to be accepted wherever dog is accepted. Since we can add "-ie" or "y" to almost any word to make it friendlier to a child, that doesn't really make it a separate word.

In response to SatharnPHL: Yes, "veggies" really is a diminutive and not a contraction, but it is now used by some people just because it is shorter. A contraction would not account for the extra letter 'i'. Also, this is used informally and I would not replace the word "vegetables" everywhere with this diminutive. It was originally listed in dictionaries as slang. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/veggies "spud" is also used as an informal word for potato, but it did not originate in the same way. Still, they may both be considered ordinary alternative words one day. Slang words may become accepted later.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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  • glasraí → “vegetables” and “vegetables” → glasraí, yes;
  • the NEID gives “greens” → glasraí glasa ;
  • I don’t know what would match “veggies” as a nickname in Irish.
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

I think you've answered your own question - "veggie" isn't really a nickname, it's more of a contraction, and there's no more reason to expect an equivalent contraction in translation than there is to expect a contraction for other words in English that don't have one (because they don't need one). There is no contraction for "pea" or "bean" or "corn" or "cabbage", but longer names like potato become "spud" (probably more of a nickname than a contraction).

The other thing to bear in mind is that the "ee" sound typically used in English for this type of informal name already has another meaning in Irish - it is one of the plural endings.

You could make the case that "veggie" is a diminutive, rather than a contraction, and that Irish does have diminutives (usually indicated with "-ín" or "óg" or "eog" endings), but given that other equivalents to "vegetables" (like "fruits" or "meats") don't have diminutives, I don't think it makes sense to think of "veggies" as a diminutive for translation purposes.

1 year ago