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  5. "Ithim glasraí agus anlann."

"Ithim glasraí agus anlann."

Translation:I eat vegetables and sauce.

August 26, 2014

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/buachaill

-with my Sunday roast... mmm...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gumamela_eater

I used "with" and was marked wrong. Is this a glitch, or is there another word for "with"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

"glasraí le (h)anlann" would be vegetables with sauce.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

A prefixed H would be needed for anlann because it follows le and it starts with a vowel — glasraí le hanlann.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

It doesn't prefix in Connacht Irish, which is honestly what I'm most used to.

See here.

Also, page 97 of Learning Irish

Le 'with' prefixes an h (which is normally not pronounced). So, yes, I should've written it. But it's not pronounced in the dialect anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/K9LVR

the word duo was looking for was "and".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melesteic

Glasra: from Old Irish glasrad (glas - green / -ra - collective)

Anlann: From Old Irish anlannd (condiment, savoury).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cesar.gera

it refused "a sauce"?! should I report? ANLANN is allowed to mean a sauce, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talideon

It can do, but it doesn't make much sense to translate it as 'a sauce' here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

I can't see why it wouldn't. Vegetables and a sauce can be the components of a very nice meal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominicCol12

Old Irish delicacy. Vegetables and sauce. Who needs potatoes and meat ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NakamuraMondo

i was wondering actually... is "glasraí agus anlann" referring to a specific dish or just any vegetables and any sauce (like there's a range of them)?

like in the U.S., "biscuits and gravy" refers to a dish with a specific biscuit and specific gravy even though without cultural knowledge, the words could refer to any variety of biscuits/gravy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

No, it's not a specific dish, it's just a vocabulary exercise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

Anlann cáise

("cheese" is an adjective in "cheese sauce" and adjectives in Irish usually come after the noun. To use a noun as an adjective, you use the genitive form of the noun).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2mhnkzrc

I eat vegetables and sauce, but not together. Never together.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannah637620

No ketchup, just sauce #mansnothot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moss680049

"'Anlann"' 'was translated as 'soup' when i was almost thought irish in school . (All those years ago)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/19O492554

All of the dictionaries that Duolingo is based on (De Bhaldraithe's English-Irish Dictionary, Ó Dónaill's Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla and Foras na Gaeilge's New English Irish Dictionary) all translate anraith as "soup", and anlann as "sauce".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John-cross

I wrote 'I am eating...' and was marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PALewis88

Someone mentioned that "I eat..." and "I am eating..." are different in Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mimi72129

It's different in American English conceptually(?). I eat fruit. I am eating fruit. Present and present present? Yeah, I'm trying to learn a new (to me) language and I can't explain my native language. It can only get better from here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

“Present present” is normally referred to as “present progressive”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Or "present continuous".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OwlAdorer

"I am eating" would be "táim ag ithe"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aya159236

I hear an "m" sound every time she pronounces "nn".

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