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  5. "Tá sibh."

" sibh."

Translation:You are.

August 26, 2014

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpbell

It would be very nice if "y'all," "you all," or something equivalent could be a correct translation of plural "you." I know it is a US regionalism, but in this region where I teach foreign languages, "y'all" is a very useful construction for helping my students understand the Spanish, French, or Latin 2nd person plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paddyobrien

Agreed. In Ireland we say "ye".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avodah

I say yous, which is accepted as a typo. I'm from Co. Wicklow if that means anything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davo256

Only outside Dublin is the "ye" form used. In Dublin we say yous or the more colloquial "yiz", as in the sentence "What are yiz looking at?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiallT

But that's only in certain parts. I know that in Derry you'll still here the original you/ye subject/object distinction: You like me, I like ye. I understand this is also heard on the other side of the border in some parts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's exactly the other way around in King James English! I like you, ye like me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jakexxiv

It's the same in Connecticut English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smhwrd

In Belfast we say yous'ns (short for yous ones). Ye is used more as singular you here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hyrune

I use "ye" too. Learned Irish in Munster and Connaught, I think ye is fairly typical personally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luiz.calheiros

since I learnt"ye" I use it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michelleplus8

This must have been fixed, because I just tried y'all and it was accepted as correct. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arretos963

I always use y'all in my answer, and it's correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

We say "yous", "you lot" or "you mob". :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

A lack of V-T distinction is one of the many things I don't like about English. I will use yous or yous'uns in ambiguous situations that take place in informal settings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oisn708055

In Scotland 'youse' is frequently used as a 2nd person plural. It really does help to differentiate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackheywood

What's the difference between "Tá sibh." and "Tá tú."? Is it a formal/informal thing (á la 'Sie' and 'du' in German)? Or perhaps a plural/singular thing (á la 'ihr' and 'du' in German)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Veekhr

Looks like it's just a plural/singular thing. I don't think "sibh" is used for formality.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiallT

Indeed not. Irish doesn't have a formal/informal distinction, just singular/plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnLonDubhBeag

For historical interest people might like to know that tú/sibh used to also have a formal/informal distinction also, but this died out around the 19th century (or early 20th century for the Northern dialects).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dubhais

...but the distinction is still maintained in Scots Gaelic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanSmyth3

you are (ye) plural you are singular


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paddyobrien

Well "you all" is just a little bit ambiguous. It can mean simply "you plural" (ye), or "all of y'all" (every last one of ye). The second meaning just gives more emphasis to the ALL. In Irish you can say "tá sibh" (y'all/ye are), and "tá sibh go léir" with "go léir" emphasising the ALL.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas_Slo

Am I getting this right - "sibh" is pronounced as "shief"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanSmyth3

'Shiv' as in Siobhán (girls name) Shiv awn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikki_67

Is 'sibh' pronounced more like 'shif' or 'shiv'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paul5121

For the record, ye does work here. Yay Hiberno English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NattKullav1

Instead of "y'all", why not use " thou" (singular)/"you"(plural)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiallT

Because hardly anyone talks like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ladron

in any event, back when that was used "thou" was intimate "you" singular, "you" was formal "you" singular afaik. I am not aware of any formal second person plural in English, early modern or contemporary, just regionalisms as discussed above e.g. ye, yous, yiz, y'all, you guys. DL usually accepts the American "y'all"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awesomedudeski

cant it be are you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiallT

No. There's a specific form for questions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nahuatl1939

Just to know something : I started with Irish not even one hour ago. I see that for the verbs TO BE and TO HAVE, the pronouns are different for each verb : i.e. TA for TO BE and IS for TO HAVE, but they remain the same for all persons ( I-You he-she etc.). What about all the other Irish verbs ? do the pronouns change with each one ? and do they always remain the same for all persons ? This would make things easier, of course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Languagease

So why isn't "You all are" accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paddyobrien

That's "tá sibh go léir"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpbell

And what does that mean exactly? A quick Googling doesn't give many clues.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paddyobrien

I was replying to Languagease's question. It means "you all are"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpbell

Sorry, I'm just trying to understand how that is different from "tá sibh." I can't speak for what Languagease meant, but "y'all" in the US means nothing more than "you, plural."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michelleplus8

Otterbot, it sounds to me like you are saying "ya all" rather than y'all. I don't know where you are, but the people I know use "y'all" as a simple plural "you," while "y'all all" (or "all y'all") would be used if intending to specify "every single one of you."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paddyobrien

Oh I see what you mean now! Well tá sibh means exactly "y'all are". I thought Languagease meant something like "all of the people in your group are". That's probably what duolingo thought he meant too, which is why they didn't accept it ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiallT

"You all" isn't the same as "y'all", though. "Y'all" means "more than one of you" but "you all" means "every single one of you".

Languagease was tring to display his understanding by being extra specific, but the Irish isn't that specific itself...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Otterbot630

I use the word y'all to mean "every single one of you." Like, if I'm addressing a group of friends (and I'm feeling like lazy speech, because in reality "y'all" really grates on me), it'd be "are y'all coming?" Not just a couple of them, but the whole group. Likewise, if I was on a stage in front of thousands of people in a rally and I cried out "Are y'all with me?!" it wouldn't mean "are more than one of you with me," it would literally mean "are every single one of you with me?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KangaRu7

Is it not "Ta Tu" Ta Sibh = They are ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanSmyth3

Ta tu = singular Ta sibh = plural (ye are)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Depends on whether you are speaking to one person (tú) or to several at once (sibh).

Many English speakers use "you" in either case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessiMcGuire

Thank you... This was helpful


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessiMcGuire

What's the difference between Tá sibh & Tá tú? Both are "you are"... But how do i know WHEN to use which one? Help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gregory743155

Tá tú = You are (singular, one person)

Tá sibh = You are (plural)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/castielthechick

I clicked the button


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatherineB316776

isn't "tá tú" the same as saying "tá sibh??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1560

No. While and sibh both translate as "you", is only used when talking to one person, sibh is only used when talking to two or more people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacqueline87551

How do you say ta sibh?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Srinidhi279905

How to pronounce sibh?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilyRaimey

It’s a massive flaw that they don’t elaborate which “you” to use when asking for you to translate it. It could be singular (tú), or plural (sibh), but since it doesn’t specify I end up losing a point if I don’t guess which one they expect from me. It’s very frustrating and it can ruin a streak or even take the last of your hearts on the middle a lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1560

This is an Irish to English translation - sibh is right there in the sentence.

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