"Dia duit! Dia is Muire duit!"

Translation:Hello! Hello to you too!

August 26, 2014

176 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/finnplek

I read somewhere you can continue this pattern by wishing 'God and Mary and St Patrick be with you' and possibly a second reply with God, Mary, St Patrick and St Brigid... (I don't know how long you can continue before you run out of saints.)

I really want this to be true :D. Does anyone know?

August 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pisan_de_Paris

You could go a long, long, LONG time without running out of saints. There are way more saints recognized by the Catholic Church than there are days in the year to give them separate feasts. You would certainly run out of memory (or patience) before you would run out of saints, probably even if you just used the ones especially popular in and Ireland.

September 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelly-Rose

And even still there are countless saints who are not recognized by the Catholic Church, innumerably more than those recognized. After all, every soul in Heaven is a saint; precisely why we have an All Saint's Day.

October 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seamus747

There are actually two different days in the Catholic calendar - All Saints and All Souls. By no means every soul is a saint according to the Catholic Church, if I understand the teaching correctly.

October 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelly-Rose

Yes that is correct. But I only meant that All Saints Day (which also happens to be a holy day of obligation) celebrates all saints, known and unknown, in part to honor those saints which do not have a recognized feast day. All Souls Day is principally celebrated for the holy souls in Purgatory. And yes, but every soul in heaven is a saint though many are unknown.

October 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerrard23

Indeed. Days also known as All Hallows. Which then yields Halloween or All Hallows Eve. Both days are pasted over the autumn equinox traditionally representing the Celtic New Year, when the fabric of the universe was parted and spirits would freely roam between the worlds. The pre-christians worshipped a huge number of gods and most likely greetings would invoke their protection as in gods protect you etc. Curses of course would go the other way. The irish (and descendents like me) generally remain deeply spiritual

April 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicholasBlaha

It's cool to see the teachings of the Catholic Church discussed on a Duolingo forum ;)

And you are correct!

February 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveKinsella

Every person in heaven is a saint according to RC teaching. Not every soul. Since some are in hell and some are in purgatory. According to the RC.

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hpfan5

Rosecrucian..?

November 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hpfan5

All Saints Day came from the Celtic/Gaelic seasonal festival of Samhain

November 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mx.MUrton

The celts arent the only ones whom Celebrate the Day of the Veil. The Paganic religions also celebrate this day, and brought it over to the New World, and then Christianity assimilated the image into this modern f***ery we have now.

January 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Egdir

Like Santa Muerte of Mexico, right?

November 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelly-Rose

I had not known of Santa Muerte, but I guess it/he/she is recognized as Death personified as a saint according to Mexican tradition? This would not be considered a saint, or even an unrecognized saint, in the Catholic Faith, however, because "Death" is not nor ever was a human being. When I said "saints that are not recognized" I meant those who have passed from this Earth either sinless at their time of death (i.e. forgiven of their sins perhaps through the Sacrament of Reconciliation just before their death), attained sainthood through the purification of Purgatory, or became martyrs (died defending their belief in the Catholic Faith). But in some cases, especially the second circumstance I mentioned, it would be impossible to determine just which souls became saints (and are therefore unknown to us as it is left up to God's just judgement). These are the saints who are honored today (November 1st), along with all the those souls we do know to be saints.

November 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/finnplek

Yes and no. Santa Muerte is a 'folk saint', i.e. an unrecognised saint by the church who nonetheless has a large local following (in fact, her cult has often been branded devil worship by the institutionalised Catholic church). Her followers very much see her as a person with a distinct character, with a uniquely Mexican and female identity. In fact, she is seen as much more 'one of the people' than the more abstract exalted 'official' saints - her followers tend to insist she likes a drink and is a heavy smoker (two very popular offerings at altars), and they're usually a bit more comfortable asking favours from her (particularly less, um, respectable favours) like bringing back a straying lover or protection from law enforcement for drugs shipments. Or just a job. There's also centuries-old local indigenous traditions of seeing Death as a person and deity, plus there is this sort of connection between Mexican national identity and representations of death (skeletons, etc) - not in a fearful but rather an intimate, non-threatening but ever-present way. Also what Egdir is saying below :). I'm by no means an expert (Feel free to correct me, mexicanos!) but i've a background in Latin American anthropology and I'm reading a book about it at the moment. It's an endlessly fascinating and complex subject :). #geek-out

November 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Egdir

Ok, thanks for clearing that up for me. Santa Muerte was given what I call the "voodoo treatment", where someone takes a pagan deity (in this case, Aztec, I think), and combines it with an existing saint in the Catholic church (although I think Santa Muerte was just given special attention like a saint would get, rather than being merged with someone).

November 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/no.name.42

I think you can make a better case for Jesús malverde being saint.

June 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GypsyHeart1

That's black magic... It belongs to a dangerous sect... It's not a religion. The followers are actually nuts. Sacrifices are made, blood of small animals running down kids' bodies and the like

January 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edna_Montes

No sacrifices at all. I mean, Mexico is a very diverse country. You find "santeros/yoruba" who practice the religion of african slaves that came to Mexico. Yes, the might kill hens but no babies. Worshipers of Santa Muerte are very diverse some might be criminals. some are just humble people form the barrio. Santa Muerte is kind of a new phenomenon compared to santeria or even native religions.

May 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard367480

Im sorry, this is a learning app. NOT a bloody game, nobody is gonna like that and if your getting it for attention. Then its NOT working, please DO NOT talk about that. The comment section is for questions, NOT stuff like that! You can write that on a piece of paper.

May 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Egdir

Sect of what?

January 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattcelt

That is what I was taught. Dia agus Muire agus Pádraig agus Bríd... and that's as far as I have gotten. I would love to know who's next - Peter? John? James?

September 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Niamh103

Dia duit/ Dia is Muire duit/ Dia is Muire is Padráig duit/ Dia is Muire is Padráig is Naomh Bríd/ Dia is Muire is Padráid is Naomh Bríd is Naomh Eoin Baiste duit/ Dia is Muire is Padráid is Naomh Bríd is Naomh Eoin Baiste is Naomh Phroinsias duit/ Dia is Muire is Padriag is Naomh Bríd is Naomh Eoin Baiste is Naomh Phroinsias is Naomh Cholm Cille duit that's as far as back as I can remember, but you can keep going and going and going... the last one translates exactly to: "God, and Mary, and St Patrick, and St Brigid, and St John the Baptist, and St Francis, and St Columcille be with you." Hope that helps :)

October 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdes596

I always was taught "Dia is Muire is Íosa (is Seosamh) duit." Which is adding Jesus and Joseph too!

October 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heimaey

Well you can never run out of saints.

November 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/martinsheridan37

Its true but before u say st.patrick be with you .you say joseph be with you

December 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ozz1-

Dia duit is god be with you so yeah (im irish)

April 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brennos86

yeah, that's actually true.

February 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davdmathews

Yes this is true. Irish kids are taught this in school when they first start learning Irish.

December 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aglaring

Yes. I have another Irish - english course, where the greetings aren't distorted.

May 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom-Morgan

Can someone explain to me the phonology behind how the initial "d" in "duit" is coming off (to this American ear) as a very clear G sound, closer to the English "g" even than a Greek "gamma" sound? I know that broad and slender vowels are a huge determining factor but it seems to have the same effect either way coming off the broad "a" in "dia" as well as the slender "e" in Muire. I do not hear this "g" sound for the letter "D" in other Gaelic words; is this purely idiomatic?

August 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magrise

In intervocalic positions in Irish, consonants frequently become palatalized or velarized depending upon the quality (front/back) of the flanking vowels. The 'd' of duit here is intervocalic: diA dUit; this is why we can see the d written with h sometimes, for example dia dhuit, the h indicating the change of pronunciation. In this particular case, the d is velarized as it is surrounded by back vowels. Velarized 'd' in Irish sounds like Greek γ (gamma).

August 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom-Morgan

So do you reckon I'm always safe using a gamma sound when I see the letter d surrounded by similar vowel sounds on both sides? I'm just trying to establish a baseline; not to mention I'm fascinated by these little linguistic minutiae. Much obliged to smrch & magrise for the in-depth info.

August 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smrch

Only initial, 'broad' (i.e. followed by a, o or u) <dh> (and <gh>) have this gamma pronunciation. E.g. dhuit, mo dhoras, a gháirdín etc.

August 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom-Morgan

go raibh maith agat

August 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seamus747

At school in Northern Ireland we learned Donegal Irish. For us "duit/dhuit" rhymed with the English words ditch and hitch and was pronounced gitch.

November 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gpgallagher

Thanks, Seamus. That was what I remembered hearing in Donegal, so I was confised by the pronunciation I heard here.

January 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smrch

"Dia dhuit/dhaoibh" are common dialect variations of "Dia duit/daoibh". When broad the pronunciation is a voiced fricative (like Greek gamma). The pronunciation /g/ on the audio here is incorrect.

August 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

Both dia dhuit and dia duit are possible. There are two problems in this question:

The written form says "duit", but the voice is (trying) to say "dhuit".

The "duit" version should be pronounced with a /ɣ/ (a voiced velar fricative—a 'gh' sound), but she's just saying /g/. Maybe that form is possible in Ulster (not sure), but it would be better if she said it the more standard way (/ɣ/), and also if she read what was written instead of using a variant form.

February 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/finnplek

A real gaelgeoir (Irish speaker) would have to explain this to you, but I have a vague recollection of reading it's something to do with 'd' changing in pronunciation before a slender vowel (e/é, i/í).

Disclaimer: this could all be nonsense. I would like to find out from someone who does know though.

August 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdes596

Not sure on the exact linguistic details, as the other repliers supplied to you, but in school they just say that when a "h" is on a "d" word, the "dh" is pronounced like a G. "mh" can be pronounced like a "v" or a "w".

October 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

To be clear:

Broad 'dh' is like 'g' (more precisely, it's a fricative: ɣ)

Slender 'dh' is like 'y'

February 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mediterranean

The "is" in "Dia is Muire duit" is actually a shortened version of "agus", right? If it is, it will make sense to me, otherwise it doesn't.

December 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seamus747

Correct.

December 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TedPs

I thought the spelling was Dia Dhuit. Can somebody tell me if that spelling is correct?

August 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/envythenight

Both are correct. The spelling difference is to do with how its pronounced in different dialects I believe.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/duit#Irish

August 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TedPs

Go raibh maith agat!!!

August 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sofer-Ben-Dov

I've double checked every textbook I've got, and it it always "Dia dhuit." That is what the speaker is saying, too.

September 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/l76bds

Both should be acceptable. Must be something to do the C.O. Standard they're using. My kids schoolbooks all have "Dia Dhuit"

September 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/czczczczcz

I'm pretty sure that's the Ulster spelling.

January 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dovyuruk

"God to You" I LOVE IRISH!!! :D <3

August 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noddyman92

'God to you too' :)

August 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.-_Gennadi_-.

I know right?!?!

June 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.-_Gennadi_-.

I mean I love irsh so much.

June 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stk

Is there a less religious way to say this?

August 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heimaey

Irish is not the only language like this. Arabic has "Insha'Allah," and in Spanish and Italian (and Portuguese, etc.) Adios, Adieu mean literally "to god" - they've just been shortened. Holiday originally meant holy day . It is impossible to get away from religion in language due to historical impact. And although many people think it, good never meant god.

August 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luiz.calheiros

Oh yeah, Portuguese too, actually poeple here try avoid say "adeus" because it is a "goodbye (to never more)"... very very deep to use every day. But "adeus <=> a deus (to god)".

September 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seamus747

The same with Adieu in French as opposed to au revoir.

November 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mediterranean

Adéu (often shortened to "déu") is used all the time in Catalan. Spanish speakers, on the other hand, usually refuse to use adiós because, as you said it happens in Portuguese, for them it sounds like a deep good-bye and they prefer to say "hasta luego". I guess we Catalan speakers are simple people.

December 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fakePolyglot69

no,InshaAllah means: if Allah wills it.

January 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chaka1987

Not really, sorry. It's one of those idioms that's lost its original meaning effectively.

August 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StrapsOption

Well, there's the colloquial Anglicised 'haigh' , pronounced 'hi'.

September 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seamus747

I have been asking that same questions for years. I have even contacted the official body that overseas Scottish Gaelic (as Scots Gaelic speakers are overwhelmingly Protestant and so would not invoke Mary) to see if they had a non-Catholic alternative response. But they don't greet each other with Dia duit, so that turned out to be moot. The short answer is no - so far no one has come up with a widely accepted alternative to "Dia is Muire duit!"

November 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mediterranean

How is it in Scottish Gaelic?

December 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/idshanks

A simple halò is used. :P

December 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mediterranean

Interesting, thanks. Maybe a word imported from the English "hello"?

December 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/idshanks

Most certainly, I'd say. The pronunciation is near enough exactly the same as a Scot pronouncing the English ‘hello’ (whether it is EXACTLY the same depends on the speaker really).

December 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hpfan5

What were the deities referenced in Ireland before Catholicism (before Romanic British invasions/migrations).. that may be a good place to start

November 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shiranaya

That would be the celtic gods and goddesses, like Teutates, Cernunnos, Epona, Taranis, Ceridwen and so on. I have heard, that celtic pagans use "Na déithe leat / Déithe duit" instead, supposedly meaning "[May the] gods be with you" - Though that might not be something for everyone either.

I suppose it is possible to construct a sort of greeting, maybe using the word "haigh" in combination with "conas atá tú?", though that might be rather colloquial, and not suitable for formal greetings.

(personal opinion incoming): I just think there should be a way for people to speak an age old language without having to swallow the religion-pill and being told to "get over it".

In high german (commonly just called "german"), there are a lot of non-religious ways to greet one another, like "Guten Tag" (Good Day) or "Grüß dich!" (Greetings to you/ "I greet you"). This is what the majority of the german speaking population uses, no matter what they believe in. The more religious people may choose to say "Grüß Gott" ("Grüße dich gott" ---> "May god greet you", having almost the same meaning as "God be with you"), though that is mostly treated like "Dia duit" in Éire these days, having no heavy religious meaning anymore.

May 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hpfan5

Interesting!! I would hope with this resurgence of Irish language learning due to Duolingo and other language apps we can repopularize greetings without Catholic/Christian connotations - because Catholic/Christian was not always the native religion of Ireland but it was imposed upon Ireland to purposefully forget old ways :/

May 28, 2016

[deactivated user]

    I actually have done this, using the plural. I am genuinely uncomfortable with how internalized Catholicism is in Irish culture and language, but I see nothing constructive about making a big deal out of it. Honestly, most don't notice the plural form of dia, especially if you say it fast enough. I'm agnostic-ish with strong pagan leanings--I usually ID as agnostic among my fellow Americans but among my fellow Gaels, I'll ID as pagan, as they usually understand and don't freak out. As long as no one is accusing me of being into the "old gods" because of Game of Thrones, I'm good. ;)

    June 9, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FeasterFamine

    Wow, I mean... isn’t this a little terrifying? To think that no one knows something as simple as how pre-Christian Irish folk said “Hello”? I suspect that the prior Irish greeting would have been similar, but referring to the Irish god(s/desses), not unlike how Irish monks started using Tuatha Dé to refer to the Israelites (People of God).

    Total conjecture but I would sure love it if anyone has any more detail or a place to point me to find out more about my pre-Christian heritage =)

    I just noticed Shiranaya’s response, and I am fascinated that the plural form (Na déithe leat) seems to be at least somewhat accepted as well. Very interesting!

    February 5, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fakePolyglot69

    lol,are you offended?

    January 18, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanHense

    Are there also non-religious greetings? I don't like religions…

    March 16, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krazyceltickid

    Should a more literal translation be accepted as well?

    August 26, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chaka1987

    It's not usually used outside of the context of a greeting.

    August 26, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heimaey

    It's such a religious greeting though - and Mary with you too!

    August 26, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seamus747

    It most definitely is religious - and for many unacceptably so - if you are a practising Protestant, Muslim or Jew.

    November 26, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AsylumMan

    "Dia" actually means God too, meaning we say "God to you" as a greeting here and "God and Mary to you" as the response to that greeting.

    June 1, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riverocks452

    Is there a reason why "Hello to you as well" is not a valid translation for "Dia is Muire duit!"? In (American) English, "Hello to you too!" is a fairly informal way of returning a greeting. I'd say it to a child or a close friend, but not someone I didn't know well.

    August 27, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TedPs

    You can just click on "my answer should be accepted" or something like that, and the team can see it and add it as a valid answer. At least that's how it's done in other languages in duolingo. Unfortunately, you'll get those "mistakes" as it takes some time to perfect the course. It's your way to help the Irish course become better I guess.

    August 27, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/idshanks

    Remember that this is a beta course, and many theoretically valid answers will be absent from the database. If you come across such an answer, click the report button, check the appropriate box, and submit; a course moderator will add your answer at his or her discretion.

    August 27, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riverocks452

    Of course! I just wanted to make sure that there wasn't a grammatical/sentence structure reason why "as well" should not be used here.

    August 27, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gpgallagher

    What does this mean, a "beta course"? I saw this mentioned elsewhere but I couldn't find an explanation.

    January 23, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    “Beta” here is used in the same meaning as is done with software testing — it means “largely, but not completely, ready for use as a finished product”.

    August 2, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

    I agree. I actually had no idea how to translate 'Dia is Muire duit' into real-sounding English, despite understanding what it means. I'd usually follow "Hello" up with another "hello" or something similar.

    February 2, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveKinsella

    There are thousands of Irish saints. Some barely remembered anymore. Many forgotten to the sands of time. There's a book I have by Hubert Butler called "Ten Thousand Saints: A Study in Irish and European Origins" that deals with this.

    November 25, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaoloAguil

    Say Dia duit. Dia is Muire duit. One more time Duolingo. This is the 5th exercise fercrissakes

    March 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MalenaNoem

    I'm not sure how, but somehow, a simple greeting phrase lead to an important religion forum!! >^<

    January 11, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dmartinyoung

    The fact that the only available greetings are clearly understood as references to religious icons does make one wonder about the culture in which the language has been revived. How accepting are Irish speakers of people who hold different religious views and may not feel comfortable invoking the Catholic saints in greeting? How did the Irish greet each other before Catholicism?

    January 25, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brennos86

    They did, and you technically still can, invoke the weather and ask for the well being of the family

    February 19, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jb11131999

    why is Muire capital?

    December 23, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkB90002585

    Because Muire refers only to the mother of Jesus and no other Mary

    January 10, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

    Or even just because it's a person's name. We capitalize all personal names, sacred or profane.

    But interesting point. Living people are called 'Máire', but not 'Muire'.

    February 2, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

    It means 'Mary'.

    January 3, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

    But it only refers to the 'mother of God'. Real people are called 'Máire', never 'Muire'

    February 2, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seankb

    How do I tell the difference between "Duit" and "Dhaoibh"? And how are they supposed to be pronounced?

    January 16, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

    They are pretty distinct, even across dialects. 'Duit' can be dit, wit, gwit, and probably some other pronunciations, and daoibh can be deeve, div, yeev, gweev, and probably some others. The 'dh' has a gutteral sound to it.

    January 16, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

    'duit' ends in a kind of t-sound

    'daoibh' ends in a kind of v-sound.

    ("Kind of", because I don't want to get into the leathan and caol here)

    February 2, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OneKadan

    I don't know about you guys, but I find the pronunciation a little hard to understand. Is "duit" supposed to sound like "guit"? Or is it just me?

    June 2, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    In some dialects (including, I believe, the one of the person who did the recordings), it's "Dia dhuit", with the "duit" leniting to "dhuit". And "dh" sounds like "gh", which should be less like a "g" and a bit more raspy. (IPA ɣ, in case you're familiar with that.)

    June 2, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OneKadan

    Right, right, I get it. :) Thanks a bunch!

    June 2, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mathias255486

    So what did Gaelic speakers say before they were christian? God to you, and thore to you too?

    February 20, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/softballchick_39

    dhuit is right, but really you have to sell hello to you too? that's not common.

    August 27, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/songoftheskies

    It's a common call-and-response pattern, like saying "you're welcome" after "thank you".

    August 29, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaelaSloan95

    how was i supposed to know there was exclamation marks

    August 28, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

    I've never seen Duolingo take off for punctuation.

    September 20, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drengenteee

    Learn how to say hello to yourself in Irish...

    September 5, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kcoughlan

    "Dia dom"

    January 21, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkB90002585

    It was a type what you hear for me so I wrote "dia duit, Dia's Muire duit"

    I seem to remember that there is a contraction form and it was used in the books I have (used in some primary school classes)

    October 22, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/language-master1

    i said it means god be with you and god and mary be with you and i was wrong???

    January 10, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khmanuel

    You were literally correct, but the designers of the course are really just taking these expressions to mean "hello" and "hello to you too", and really, that's how Irish speakers are thinking of it as well.

    January 16, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeavRobins

    Well. This sentence legit confused me.

    February 16, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/naomhniall

    As I understand, is a fun poke if someone STARTS with "Dia is Muire duit," to add the "Patrick." Why cannot the translation say "God with you, God and Mary with you"? That's what it actually means.

    March 5, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    No, it means "Hello", like Icelandic "Blessadur" means "goodbye" even if the literal derivation is from "blessed".

    Meaning is how people use the language to communicate, not necessarily the origin behind the words.

    When we say "It's two o'clock", it doesn't mean "It is two of the clock", you're just referring to a specific time. Translating it into (say) French as "Il est deux de l'horloge" is not translating "what it actually means" because that's not what people think of when they say "two o'clock", nor the meaning they want to convey.

    May 10, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dmartinyoung

    I do not understand your point about meaning here. The meaning of a word or phrase is not limited to the commonly understood meaning from a majority. It always ties back to origins, as well as the intent of the speaker, particularly in written form. When I hear "two o'clock", it means two of the clock, as opposed to some other count of time increment. Are you saying that most people are wholly unaware of the origin when they use these phrases, or that they should lose awareness? The words we use without thinking indicate something about our culture and something about ourselves. And I think some people remain aware, despite the possible masses who may use words thoughtlessly. Without awareness of the effect of the origin on a word's connotations, English speakers might still accept the word jew used as a verb to be a simple synonym for cleverly negotiate or cheat, rather than recognizing it for the ethnic slur that its origins make it.

    January 9, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ag3n7_z3r0

    I was advised on a previous exercise that simply "Hello. Hello." was accepted, but I see that it is not.

    March 18, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angel_XD

    Primero me aparece como hi, hello to you too, ahora en este ejercicio lo pongo y me aparece que error que era hello, hello to you to

    March 25, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hpfan5

    Hay una differencia -Hi y Hello

    November 3, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AshlynnRiver

    Okay guys. From reading the comments on this page, if you say "Dia duit!" it's different from "Dia daoibh" because with "Dia duit" is usually followed with something religious? Or am I just really confused and missed something?

    July 16, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    No, the difference is whether you are talking to one person ("Dia duit!") or to several people ("Dia daoibh!").

    July 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AshlynnRiver

    Okay. Thank you so much! It makes sense. Thanks again!

    July 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaireD395

    ok so, for all of you non-native irish speakers, 'duit/dhuit' is most certainly NOT pronounced 'g-with-'......anywhere!! it should be 'g-witch'.

    October 2, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brennos86

    I find the pronouciation really different from the standard kerry pronouciation and different from my Ulster pronouciation. Strange

    February 19, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kellykacixo

    this is right

    February 25, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1116284439

    hi ;)

    April 19, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucyyschh

    Shouldn't it be "Hello to you, too!" Instead of just "Hello to you too"?

    May 18, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D0BBYISAFREEELF

    How do you say duit? And does dhuit make any difference?

    July 5, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lily_Snape_

    Is there a less religious way to say this? And I thought the Irish language came before Christianity, did they still say it this way?

    July 6, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerrard23

    Before christianity there were multiple gods and no one knows what they said because nothing was written down. Likely they said something like "may the gods be with you" the gods were in the earth the sky every plant and animal and stone.

    April 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeamasMacGregor

    ok, I like to use "funny English" when learning a language, and the program's insistence that "God and Mary with you" MUST be "translated" as "Hello to you too" is really annoying.

    October 29, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerrard23

    Today 18 may 2017 it accepted "God to you! God and Mary to you!"

    April 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karen187827

    There was no too in that one there was only to

    January 25, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaCeeBeale

    Is there a way to say "hello to you too" without the Muire? Im just wondering if the "Muire" is just traditionally how its said or if its a strictly Catholic greeting.

    March 27, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paul147759

    How can they change from god and mary to hello. We are here for to learn the proper irish version not some anglasized simplified version. Direct irish translation please !!!!!!!!!

    April 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aglaring

    This is a MISTAKE!!! The Christian roots mustn't be forgotten!!!

    May 30, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ComanDalto

    In a few cases, I seem to have the correct.answer when matched with yours, but my answer is graded as incorrect! Do the correct use of caps, exclamation marks, etc, count as part of the correct amswer

    November 26, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kiwibumbum

    Is hello dia dhuit or dia duit

    February 14, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Casey799541

    So the voice that reads this to me pronounces "duit" like the english word "wheat". Is that correct at all?

    January 11, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AingealMcM

    The Irish were very competitive, I expect the number of saints would depend on how many people were being said Hello to, and giving individual replys as when entering a room with people in.

    January 18, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelmaToosj

    Why does DuoLingo not accept when I translate this sentence as: May God be with you. May God and Mary be with you!?

    March 7, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelmaToosj

    Why doesn't DuoLingo accept a translation like May God be with you?

    March 7, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1193

    Probably because Dia duit doesn't mean "May God be with you".

    March 7, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tarlach9

    When someone sneezed in the old days it was "Dia linn" for the first sneeze. Dia's Muire linn for the second, Dia's Padraig for the third and so on. These days all I ever heard (in Connemara) was Dia linn is Muire *linn means with us"

    April 9, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JunaydShar

    This is so confusing i would like to have more detailed sentences please

    May 31, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tormod18

    Can anyone explain to me when to use capitalized M on Muire/muire and when not to? And please also the explanation why.

    August 7, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1193

    Muire is a name. As a proper noun, it is always capitalized.

    August 8, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tormod18

    Thank you. I believe that I might have bean confused by 'maith', and since Duolingo doesn't correct me if I write 'muire' in stead of 'Muire' (at least in the early exercises) I have probably tricked my self into to believing that the word/name may sometimes be spelled with a small 'm'

    August 8, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruboto

    The app should technically accept 'God to you' as a translation...

    August 29, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ckalenda

    Not really. It's an idiomatic phrase, and doesn't actually mean what the words are saying. It should only accept what the phrase actually means, since when you see or hear that phrase, you should immediately recognize that they're saying hello.

    If someone asked for a translation of "kicked the bucket" in their own language, you wouldn't tell them the direct translation, you'd tell them it is a way to say someone died. You might add that it literally means "kicked the bucket," as well, but as an interesting aside rather than an actual translation.

    September 2, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruboto

    I understand totally the concept behind it and idioms and all. I just think technically, it does indeed translate (literally) to that.

    September 2, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

    It never means 'God to you' (whatever that would mean). It entirely and unmistakeably means 'hello', and nothing else.

    February 2, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerrard23

    It actually entirely and unmistakeably means god be with you.

    April 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

    Are you're saying that if someone says 'dia duit' to you that you would take it as them blessing you, rather than a greeting?

    May 14, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    But translation is not about translating literally. It's about translating meaning.

    If you translated German "Das ist gehupft wie gesprungen" into English as "That's leaped as jumped", it might be a cute mnemonic but will be of little use to most speakers, who would be much better served with "That's six of one, half a dozen of the other".

    May 10, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dmartinyoung

    The words do make a difference. Saying "kicked the bucket" is not a matter-of-fact translation of "died", but rather impolite and offensive to a significant percentage of people. Similarly, the words we use to greet a person indicate something, and in this case an acceptance of the religious entities as being important to the one we greet or to the culture. Otherwise, why use these words at all, when there are so many meaningful things we could say?

    January 25, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

    No, English must be "God with you" We don't always use the same prepositions. This is an idiom meaning "Hello!"

    September 2, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ckalenda

    I wouldn't use "God be with you," either, because that would generally be used as a parting rather than a greeting. The only really acceptable translation here is "hello."

    September 2, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerrard23

    It does as of 18 may 17

    April 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Losa721809

    Morally and ethically, I have a very difficult time wishing any living being an evil sociopathic imaginary being upon them. Not to mention forcing anyone to spew some religiously based nonsense is also a problem for me.

    April 1, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Out of curiosity, do you say "Goodbye" or "Bye" in English when someone leaves, or "Bless you" when someone sneezes?

    If not, what do you say in those situations?

    April 1, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerrard23

    I say all of those things. I am agnostic yet my irish parentage still has me saying god bless or thank god to irish elders. And i do indeed mean may YOUR god go with you as the late great Dave Alan used to say.

    April 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerrard23

    No one is asking you to judge them. Its just the current custom like adieu or adios or godspeed or god bless. Think of it as a wish for blessings on you by whatever you hold to be your god. The mary bit i accept is a bit rich and will not always be used. Right now its not a bad representation by the programmers. Lets move on.

    April 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnAPhela

    your translation is an insult to Irish people. God be with you and God and Mary with you. and terms such as God bless the work are the traditional Christian greetings down through the centuries

    July 6, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidluisshanks

    hello what to you to from

    July 31, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidluisshanks

    hello what do you do from

    July 31, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wbobby

    i found that this is not the the right reply considering i am from Egypt

    April 15, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cakeyem

    i swear to god. it put mary's name in here. anD THEN WHEN YOU ACTUALLY PUT IT IN THERE IT CoUNTS it WRONg

    April 25, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KangaRu7

    This translation "Hello ! Hello to you too" is incorrect , Should be "God be with you ! God and Mary be with you (or to you)"

    December 19, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Your translation is incorrect. There is no word in the original corresponding to the "be" in your sentences.

    (In order words, you seem to be trying to translate literally, but have realised that this does not work because English is not Irish, so you have tried to transform the resulting ungrammatical English into idiomatic English. But I believe you have not gone far enough in this converstion to "idiomatic English", by ignoring how the phrases are used in Irish.)

    December 19, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AineBainne

    the correct translation is God be with you and God and Mary be with you. In northern Irish one says " ca dé mar ata tu." when addressing someone .Please be exact !!

    March 3, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrigidPadraig

    No, The literal translation is "God be with you. God and Mary be with you". The correct translation is "Hello. Hello to you too/as well".

    And I'm assuming you're referring to "cad é mar atá tú", which is a phase used for asking how someone is doing, and doesn't specifically mean "hello". But I agree with you that it can be commonly included in the greeting.

    March 31, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KangaRu7

    Some are complaining about literal translations but I find this a big impediment to learning a language if you are not advised or allowed use the literal translation.. Anybody learning a language can be thrown into great confusion as the words written or spoken do not translate or give any clue . In "Dhia is Mhuire duit " are the translated English words God and the name Mary" I am Irish and thats the greeting I hear, not "Hello" Duolingo should highlight where their translations are Idioms and not Literal. My translation is more correct than Duolingos so give me back my credit.

    January 26, 2017
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