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"Lo siento, no tengo dinero."

Translation:Sorry, I do not have money.

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5 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

In case you want to know how to use Lo Siento etc. In real situations I found this tips sheet...

1Use "perdón" to excuse yourself in minor situations. Perdón is essentially the Spanish analog to the English "pardon" or "pardon me." It can be used in most minor, everyday incidents, such as accidentally bumping into someone or interrupting someone.

2Say "disculpa" or "disculpe" to apologize for minor incidents. For use with the informal tú, you would say "disculpa;" for use with the formal usted, you would say "disculpe." This word, which means essentially "apologies" "forgive me," is appropriate for minor incidents in which you need to excuse yourself. It can be used in the same situations as perdón., perdoneBoth perdón,perdone disculpa, disculpe are examples of listener-oriented apologies, because they make the listener the subject of the sentence. This structure, which is common in Spanish, places the emphasis on the listener's ability to forgive you rather than on your own feelings of regret.

3Use "lo siento" to express deeper remorse or ask for forgiveness. Lo siento, which literally means "I feel it," is the phrase that most novice Spanish speakers will learn as the all-purpose apology. In reality, lo siento should be used only in fairly serious situations, where depth of emotion is important. Saying "lo siento" after accidentally bumping into someone, for example, is a bit too excessive.You can also say "lo siento mucho" or "lo siento muchísimo," meaning "I'm so sorry" or "I'm very sorry." Another variation with the same meaning is "cuánto lo siento." ( how sorry I am)This apology is appropriate for serious situations such as the death of a loved one, a break-up, or a firing or layoff.

4Say "lo lamento" to express deep regret. Lo lamento literally means "I regret it." It can be used in place of lo siento to express remorse in more serious situations.Lo siento and lo lamento

5Use a longer phrase to express a little more detail. For example, you can say "lo siento lo ocurrido," meaning "I'm sorry about what happened." Try using the Spanish apologies above combined with other vocabulary to construct an apology specific to your situation. But do search or find some reference articles to write a correct condolence note.

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Reply145 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

THANK YOU! I've been wanting to ask for the difference in usage of these words/phrases. I've also heard "permiso": that's like when you want to pass through/get by people in a crowded place or maybe reach over someone to grab something, yes? (I ask because in English, this is one of the many uses of "excuse me.") Speaking of which, if one burps, would it be "perdón"?

Again, much appreciated!

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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So that time I accidentally opened the door to an occupied urinal and said "lo siento", was that fitting?

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThanKwee
ThanKwee
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Or perhaps you're walking along the streets of Juarez, Mexico and some poor little child holds out his hand asking for money, but you've spent all of your money and have nothing to give him. That would be an appriopiate time to say "Lo siento, no tengo dinero".

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Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WeiDeTaiwan

I should have learned this before going to Mexico.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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'Hola. Como estas?' would be appropriate. ;)

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BookWorm869

I found this really useful, especially since I use 'lo siento' regularly for simple things. Thanks!

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/startinthesea

Thank you for this useful post! I'm still wondering about one thing, though: how do you say "Excuse me" if you'd like to get someone's attention, like if you were asking a question to an employee at a store? I used "Disculpe" in Mexico but I wasn't sure if it was correct.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Excuse me, can I help you?- Perdone, ¿qué desea? Excuse me, can I help you?- Disculpe, ¿en qué los sirvo?

Excuse me, may I ask you a question? Disculpe, ¿Puedo hacerle una pregunta?

One other I see a lot is to excuse yourself from the table or the room or need to leave.

Y se me ha hecho tarde, con permiso. And I'm late for lunch, so if you'll excuse me.

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Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/startinthesea

Thanks for your explanation! This'll help me the next time I go to a Spanish-speaking place :)

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ACatNamedRed

Thank you! I would give you a lingot, but I don't know how to do that yet.

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Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sanyam5891

No problem, duolingo is free ...

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Espanol_Polak

Dosh is not accepted?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulkoniev

Looks like it is a FIRST phrase i met in 3 weeks of learning Spanish by Duolingo that is REALLY useful!

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NathanPain4

i am at a 48 day streak

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cactusfish

So does "lo siento" literally translate to "the feel"? If I remember correctly, "lo" has the function of changing a verb into a noun, right?

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidgonzar
davidgonzar
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no, ´´lo siento´´ significa literalmente ´´i feel it´´

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshTay

And "I'm sorry" actually means "I feel sorrow". So it is all about feelings. Whoa, woah, woah feelings..

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I agree that means 'I feel it' so for the sake of learning to construct a sentence 'lo' is required as a neuter gender article and not translated in english. We use it when an adjective stands in for a noun. Comments?

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

well ... in some phrases, yes: lo mismo (the same thing), lo peor (the worst part/thing), lo más importante (the most important thing). What's important (¡ja! that was not on purpose, but it would be "lo importante") in these phrases is that "thing" or "part" is not translated into Spanish (cosa/parte) but rather the phrases use "lo" ... but "lo" is also "it" or "him" (direct object).

"lo siento" literally means "I feel it" (as stated above), so "lo" here is a direct object, not an article.

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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Her "s" sounds geminated, as if she's saying "los siento".

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnNette20
AnNette20
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What's wrong with the translation "I'm sorry, I haven't got any money"?

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluharty13

My guess would be that it's because, while that conveys the same meaning, it's not really a translation of the sentence. Or it may just be that that particular phrasing is not in their list of acceptable answers.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnitaBuben

Sorry, I haven't any money. Should be acceptable also.

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Reply2 years ago