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  5. "Salann, piobar agus ola."

"Salann, piobar agus ola."

Translation:Salt, pepper and oil.

August 26, 2014

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brentv

i always muck up the spelling! never studied a language with spelling so difficult!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

You’ve never studied English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HetaliaCA

I have and dear god. I know it's my fluent language but my god it can be very difficult when you look into it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MsStealYourGirl

Irish spelling isn't that bad at all, in fairness. There's a rule "leathan le leathan agus caol le caol" that should help though. It means when you have verbs with a, e or u, they're broad (leathan) and the endings will usually match up. Likewise, the narrow (caol) vowels i and e will normally match up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soupandbread

a, o, u broad. e, i slender.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StrapsOption

It is difficult for spelling, yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suomi

Does Irish not have the Oxford comma, or is it optional like in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paul5121

Optional like in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrJohnHouse

This strengthen test really wants me to know salt, pepper and oil...the last six questions were variations on it, ha ha.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1450

"pibber" seems like an odd rendition of "piobar".

teanglann.ie doesn't have a pronunciation entry for "piobar", but I would expect something more like "pyubar".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arcsech

Should "Salt, a pepper and oil." be accepted here? I was thinking pepper as in a bell pepper, not pepper as in the seasoning. Which may be a different word, I'm just curious.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

It should be accepted, since piobar (like “pepper”) could be either one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tieganaaliyah

I'm in fifth year and have been doing irish since i was three years old, higher level throughout secondary school, and i cant even pass the placement test


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gruamaire

tá sé ceart agat náire a bheith ort


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DRDorothyL

Okay when it comes to punctuation is it different from english, or can it be used at any point?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

It’s generally safe to use English punctuation conventions in Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/proinsias123

I heard that you use agus or is in a sequence, instead of the comma, in Irish. Is that correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Yes — “polysyndetic coördination” is the technical term for it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emy597324

Is there a difference in Irish between pepper (the seasoning) and a pepper (the vegetable)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The difference in Irish is identical to the difference in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caspengo

is salt salann actually pronounced something like savan... i just noticed it and it confused me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1450

I hear "salann" with an "l".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caspengo

could be i am just hearing things or possibly i know hindi where there is a word सावन if i wrote it in english it would roughly be sawan it means monsoon i think that caused me to hear things this is a link to what it sounds like... i could not find a better way to post it https://translate.google.com/#auto/en/%E0%A4%B8%E0%A4%BE%E0%A4%B5%E0%A4%A8


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1450

If you can, just ignore the "sa" sound at the start, and try to listen to the second syllable - I hear "lun", very different from the example you posted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caspengo

as i said i think i was just hearing things that day.

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