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  5. "Téann tú."

"Téann tú."

Translation:You go.

August 26, 2014

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maa249530

Tèan tú cailín


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/buachaill

What is the difference between this and "ta tu ag dul"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UaSirideain

Téann tú = you go (habitually); Tá tú ag dul = you are going (right now)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Triceradan

"Téann tú" means "you go", but "tá tú ag dul" means "you are going"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TreasaWilson

Is it just the audio? I don't hear a 't' at the beginning of the second word at all. It sounds as though she is saying 'pu', but the 't' at the beginning of téann was quite clear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lambertsimnel

Can this be imperative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

The imperative form would be Téigh! — the imperative second person singular form is the lemma of an Irish verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

Good to know. There have been a few good tips on here recently and not a small number of them have been yours, scilling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet
  • 329

No. There's a separate imperative form (that's just gone entirely ou of my head for this verb).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aglaring

Excuse me, please, just an observation. The verb: To go ( translated into Gaelic by Téann tu ), belongs to the second or first conjugation? I see that the final part, in the sentence, is written as: Téann tú, is added -ann to the final part, when is cutted -igh, from téigh, and that means Teigh belongs to the first conjugation, and not to the second conjugation. Or not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aglaring

Ok. Thank you very much. I also saw here in this web site the Gaelic Grammar, and I think it will be useful to everyone. http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnieEzzell

Can someone explain the different between 'sibh' and 'tú'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eclectic1234

Since you asked this a month ago, you probably know the answer now, but "sibh" is the plural "you."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnieEzzell

go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sunflowerkay

Could you say this as a command?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mire43050

Sounds like Téim tú


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MNMmcg

If é is slender, why does "Té" in this case get the broad ending "ann"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1449

The purpose of the leathan le leathan, caol le caol rule is to align the vowels on either side of a consonant. There is no rule that requires the vowel next to a vowel agree, because that would prevent ae, ai, ea, eo, ia, etc, etc ever occurring. As é is what makes the T slender, and there is no need for the é to agree with the following vowel, there is no need to choose the "slender" eann ending, particularly as it would mean that téann would be spelled téeann, and that middle e* would serve no purpose, and Irish doesn't use double vowels.

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