"La sua personalità è cambiata."

Translation:His personality has changed.

August 26, 2014

67 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoranMilokanovic

Why 'His personality IS changed' is not a valid answer? To me this phrase looks like simple present passive, not present perfect. Anyone? Thnx in advance.

January 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

Duo just doesn't seem to want to admit that "is changed" is a valid translation of "è cambiata".
1. It is perfectly good English.
2. Without any context setting a time frame for the sentence, there is nothing constraining anyone from translating it that way.
3. Past participles which are conjugated with essere have to agree with the subject, just like adjectives. In face, they are a lot closer to being adjectives than they are to being verbs.
4. Translating "is" as "has" is not necessary in many instances where the English idiom works either way. It may very well be that using "is" rather than "has" is a better translation which better transmits the meaning of the verb and sentence.
5. By refusing to accept "is" as an auxiliary in sentences like this, Duo is making English a poorer language, because it is missing out on a degree of nuance the use of "is + [past participle]" imparts.
6. "has changed" - changed what? Or into what. Conjugating with "to have" makes "to change" either transitive or reflexive. If transitive, then the sentence lacks a direct object. If reflexive, then "to have" is the wrong auxiliary, because he has changed himself (by what process?), and it is simpler and less ambiguous to simple say, "He is changed." In other words, when people remark "He has changed" and they mean "He is different form the way he was before", they are really saying "he is changed", and they are using the wrong words.
. For example, when you look at someone in the present moment and notice changes from the last time you saw him, you are observing the changes NOW, so what you are seeing is the fact that he IS changed now. It's a conclusion of logic to say that "he has changed", but you may not know when or why or how - and your conclusion that he has changed is based entirely on your current observation that he is changed.

February 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Jeffrey: To pick up on your example, I believe most natives would say "he has changed", though I agree that 'he is changed' isn't incorrect. If one said "he's changed" then I suppose you could take the apostrophized verb for either 'is' or 'has' though I think most would assume it's short for "he has' rather than "he is" as when used to say e.g. 'he's sick'.

February 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

Most would say it - but that's in part because Americans are becoming so ignorant of their own language, it gives me pause, with a deep breath. A whole facet of nuance is being ground off by the purveyors of simplicity in our school system and in the culture as a whole.

That really wouldn't bother me so much, but I firmly believe that you can only think as big as your vocabulary - meaning not necessarily words, but the whole basket of words, ideas, concepts. The US is becoming an under-educated society which is incapable of considering big and creative ideas simply because it's people lack the vocabulary to understand them.

I'd hate to see Duo contribute to that, but it is, by refusing to accept valid English like "he is changed".

February 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesPit19

Two years on … I agree totally. Even publications that were the bastion of proper grammar are giving in to a dumbed down English language. And this from an engineer!

August 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jason513671

Because 'His personality is changed' is not proper english grammar. 'His personality has changed' is the correct answer for the present perfect form. If you would like to use "is" then 'His personality is changing' is acceptable, but not in this particular lesson. I understand that Duolingo has not always been consistent with regards to proper grammar and translating between italian and english but I believe in this instance they are correct. https://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/words/s_is_has.htm

November 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Jason, you're correct except for saying that "His personality is changing is acceptable" since it'd be the wrong tense: e' cambiata is past tense not present.

November 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margaret_S

you used a present tense verb, is.

April 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lunaexoriens

How would I say: "His personality is volatile/changeable"?

August 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

There is nothing wrong with doing that, except in Duo's limit scope. "Changed" here is both and adjective and a participle, depending on whether you conjugate it with "to have" or "to be."

February 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoppioMAB

In this lesson/ section, you have to remember to use "has" instead of "is", in all cases.

Technically, "is" is also incorrect in English...

February 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jan114056

As a native English speaker of "a certain age" I would use 'He has changed.' in a different sense than 'He is changed.' For example: if I had seen a person earlier in the day with slacks and a sweater, and now he is wearing shorts and a t-shirt, I might comment "He has changed." However, if a friend is behaving differently than I'm used to the comment would more likely be "He is changed." I agree with the person who said there is no context for judging whether this è should be is or has.

April 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

jan...your examples are interesting and I agree with you. I'm wondering though whether for the most part speakers who'd phrase both of your scenarios as "He's changed" could open the door so to speak for both interpretations, without those speakers really knowing or consciously thinking about which of the two they're actually saying.

April 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jtflematti

how can it be his if it's cambiat"a" is this right or is this a mistake on duolingo's part?

October 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gab_PS

It's right. ''La personalità'' is feminine, that's why ''cambiata'' takes an ''a''. It doesn't matter if we are talking about a boy or a girl, it's the personality that has changed.

October 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jtflematti

Oh this is hard, but makes sense haha thank you very much for clearing that up for me.

October 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

Compound verbs conjugated with essere act like adjectives - they have to agree in number and gender with the subject of the sentence.

Compound verbs conjugated with avere have no such requirement in regard to the subject of the sentence - there is never any agreement with the subject.

The following may seem daunting, but don't freak out. As with all the other stuff, it gets more clear each time you come back to it. (One of the tricks to learning a foreign language is being comfortable with not knowing the answer.)

You will come across it in the future, so it won't seem unfamiliar to you then. It probably appears in this module somewhere. Perhaps read it for reference back later - copy and paste it into a document file you can save on your computer. (When I'm done writing this, I will do the same, so I can find it easily.)

If a compound verb is conjugated with avere (e.g., lui ha visto - "he has seen"), and it is preceded by a 3rd person direct object pronoun (he, she, it, them - lo,la,lo,lì,le ), then the past participle has to agree with gender and number of the pronoun. Examples:

Lui ha visto la ragazza? Sì, Lui l'ha vista.
Hai visto questo film? No, non l’ho visto.
Hai finito i compiti? Sì, li ho finiti.
Quando hai visto la signora? L’ho vista lunedì.
Dove hai messo le mele? Le ho messe nella scatola.

This is tricky for two reasons:

  1. lo and la ("he, it, and she") are changed to l' in front of the avere verbs, so you often don't know just from the pronoun l' whether it's masculine or feminine. At least you know it's singular, because plurals and le are not changed when in front of any word beginning in a vowel.

  2. It's 3rd person of the direct object that matters, not the person or gender or number of the subject and verb. The direct object pronoun has to be lo, la, lì or le in order to require agreement. And it doesn't matter which person, gender, or number the actual subject and verb are.

Even if the verb is 1st or 2nd person singular or plural (io, tu, noi, voi ), if the direct object is one of the four 3rd-person pronouns, then the participle has to agree. In the example about; le ho messe nella scatola - "I put them in the box." messe agrees with le, even though the subject and verb are 1st person singular. le is one of the 3rd person pronouns, and it appears before the verb.

For 1st and 2nd person direct object pronouns, agreement of the participle with the direct object is optional.

There is one really tricky point: Lei, the Formal You. It is conjugated with a 3rd person verb, but is supposedly 2nd person. I'm not certain exactly how to handle it, even with adjectives, because it looks feminine, but I don't know that I'd want to say to an Italian man, "Lei è alta". He might be very offended that I used a feminine adjective ending. I'm going to ask one of my Italian-speaking friends here about this and try to get back here with an answer.

Also, if there any typos and errors, I will correct them later.

February 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex518387

thank you!

March 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erdnaoluap

What about "La sua personalità si è cambiata"? Is there any essersi in Italian?

December 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margaret_S

'His personality changed itself' hmmmm...

April 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

I had the same question as erdnaoluap, namely why not reflexive. In an earlier sentence in this same exercise the sentence read: he has changed; the italian read: lui si è cambiato.

May 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

Yes, I found this interesting, too. It seems there is a distinction between a person changing (transitively) and an entity changing (intransitively).

March 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wonderguppy

"Cambiarsi" is used almost always in the context of changing clothes. So DuoLingo's choice of "cambiare" is correct here.

October 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LalehSafari

There must be a third correct translation: Your personality changed (formal)

February 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoppioMAB

The "formal" you is used pretty much only in its own little section, and ignored everywhere else in Duolingo.

You're not the first to complain about it, but I don't think that the editors are going to change it. Too confusing. Also, if it were written (using the formal) it would be a capital letter S on "La Sua", I believe, but the program accepts capitals and lower case as equals.

February 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce55312

It's now accepted.

August 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margaret_S

It is not formal. The ending changes to reflect the gender of the subject, when verbs with essere are used.

April 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

I asked this question 11 months ago and still don't see a satisfactory explanation, namely why not reflexive: La sua personalità SI è cambiata. In an earlier sentence in this same exercise the sentence read: he has changed and the italian read: lui si è cambiato.

April 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoribethClark

What changed is different. In "Lui si è combiato", the HE changed. In "La sua personalità è cambiata", the PERSONALITY changed. Personality is a what, not a who, and the reflexive is used with who not what. At least that's how I remember it. Maybe it isn't correct, but so far it has worked for me when deciding.

March 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wonderguppy

"Cambiarsi" is used almost always in the context of changing clothes. So DuoLingo's choice of "cambiare" is correct here.

October 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Krisbaudi

Her personality has changed Was marked wrong and I don't understand why.

January 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Krisbaudi: That should be correct too. You should definitely report it.

January 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/filiwian

E can also mean has ?

August 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cantchooseaname

Some verbs which use "to have" as auxiliary in English use "to be" in Italian.

August 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/willt123

Is there a rule to know which to use?

October 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vincemat

In google images, look up "la casa di essere"

May 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AluraSanGiorgi

Why do they not use 'cambiato' in this case? I understand that 'personalità' is feminine, but I thought that in the present perfect, the 'o' only changed into an 'a' after 'lo/l'/etc'?

June 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

If I remember correctly, when you use essere as a helping verb there must be agreement in gender and number.

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

When essere is the auxiliary verb, the past participle must agree with the subject in gender and number. It's the same rule as for adjectives - the past participle is acting a lot like an adjective when essere is the auxiliary.

February 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jill29707

Why did they use essere here and not avere?

January 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Jill...It's because 'essere' is being used intransitively, i.e., it's being used here without a direct object.

January 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pattyvital91

can I say ha cambiato???

December 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

pattyvital91: I don't believe so. Cambiare uses essere if the verb's being used intransitively as here, avere if used transitively. I could be incorrect and there could be regional differences or even different usage based on what one's supposed to say and what's actually said, but I think that's correct.

December 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pattyvital91

Thanks for your answer, its just that I dont get it cuz in English is HER PERSONALITY HAS CHANGED and in Spanish it would be the same as in English SU PERSONALIDAD HA CAMBIADO.... very different from Italian T.T

December 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

patty...I can't comment on the spanish, but in english we only use 'have' in our compound past tenses. There is no other choice. We don't use 'to be' whereas languages like italian and german do.

December 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

That would work if cambiare were being used transitively, but here it is being used intransitively and so uses essere as the auxiliary verb.

November 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carobarro

so, how would you say "her personality has changed"....same thing, no?

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

carobarro: yes, also 'its'.

April 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveKillick

I am unsure about this: è cambiata means has changed but when the bottle è aperto it is open. Does this mean I can use the is changed regarding her personality and still be correct? It makes no sense to say the bottle has opened.

August 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Steve, Aprire is a transitive verb, so it's not going to ever use essere as an auxiliary when it's functioning as a verb. So if you see it used w/ essere, then you can be sure its past participle is no longer functioning as such, but rather as an adjective, as in your example: the bottle is open. Some verbs always use essere, so when translating their past tenses into English you have no choice but to translate them using 'have'. Sono andato > I have gone. Others like cambiare can use both avere and essere, depending on whether they're being used transitively (with a direct object) or intransitively (e.g. to show change), and cambiare is one of them: Ho cambiato le scarpe > I changed shoes but Il tempo e' cambiato > the weather has changed.

August 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveKillick

Thanks you so much for taking teh time and trouble to explain, it is much appreciated.

August 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Steve, Glad to have helped.

August 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoribethClark

If "La sua personalita e cambiata" is "His personalty has changed," then how do you say "HER personality has changed"?

March 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

LoribethClark: Out of context it could mean: HIS/HER/or ITS personality has changed. Context is everything. An alternate way of saying it absent context would be: La personalità di lei è cambiata vs ...di lui...

March 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoribethClark

Thank you. That's kind of what I thought. When your native language does not rely on gender, it is sometimes very confusing when learning Italian, which does rely heavily on gender. Unfortunately, in the Duolingo setting, context is often absent.

March 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

Loribeth...glad to have helped.

March 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berto29441

Hi for "hiS" (typo) not recognised...

July 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bettinger7

its not fair it can also be ( her) i lost my level because of that!

February 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roxannagiovanna

Both forms are correct. "His personality IS changed, or His personality HAS changed. We say "He IS changed" OR "He HAS CHANGED".

May 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LawrenceDa14

Could someone explain why the answer is his personality and not hers? I'm lost.

July 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tinushi77

With essere as a helping verb, you have to conjugate in gender. "È cambiata" is femininum not masculinum. "His personality has changed is "La sua personalità è cambiato"

July 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Cambiata will always be feminine here to match personalità. The his or her isn't the subject.

July 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christina226821

is should be accepted - lame

February 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattBird2

He has changed personality......that should be acceltabme5

October 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Germanlehrerlsu

"He has changed personality" isn't standard English. The sentence simply means; "His personality has changed."

October 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark893740

Why is this sentence SVO but the previous "spring has started" sentence not? I'm fed up with this grammatical inconsistancy?

March 27, 2017
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