"brógaair."

Translation:He has shoes on.

4 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Both “He has shoes on.” and “He’s wearing shoes.” are treated as correct answers. Perhaps “He wears shoes.” should also be a correct answer?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oftkiltered
oftkiltered
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The verb "to wear" isn't here as I see it even though having shoes on and wearing shoes means the same thing. I believe "he wears shoes" would be "caitheann sé bróga"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Yes, caith means “wear”, but bí … ar also means “wear” with respect to clothing. The FGB describes the latter as “Of anything covering or enclosing, attached to or supported by body or thing” — see its definition and examples for ar² II. 1. (e) here, and the examples for definition 4 of “wear” in the NEID here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jack98

and also "there are shoes on him"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kieroid
kieroid
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i agree..."he wears shoes" should be accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DrJohnHouse
DrJohnHouse
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Agreed...I wrote "he wears shoes". :/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michelleplus8

Also, "He has on shoes."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lolbrainco

Does anyone have a better pronunciation they can spell out phonetically for "air"? The speaker sounds like she's saying "ed" with a soft d. Is that correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The speaker is properly pronouncing the slender r in air. That sound, /ɾʲ/, a palatalized alveolar tap, is not found in English, although the unpalatalized version is found in North American English as the “tt” in words such as “batter” (which is often perceived as “badder” in other English dialects).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arrikis1

Why does it sound like she is pronouncing air like it ends in sh? Is that a normal pronunciation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NiavlysB
NiavlysB
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So,

"Tá bróga air" = He has shoes on

"Tá bróga aige" = He owns shoes

Is that right ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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“He owns shoes” would be Is leis bróga.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lorraine2016

"Tá bróga aige" = he has shoes

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sean_Roy
Sean_RoyPlus
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So would "Níl bróga air" mean he's not wearing shoes?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Yes.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
nahuatl1939
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i'd like an explanation : if" ta broga air " means " he has shoes on " why is Ta... air given as HE MUST in a previous sentence in this lesson ( he must swim.) WHAT IS THE REAL MEANING OF "AIR" is it a verb meaning TO HAVE OR TO MUST) (ITO HAVE TO ?) i was tempted to translate this as HE MUST HAVE SHOES but I didn't like it and then i saw DUO's translation which confuses me. . Thanks for you help.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ruamac
ruamac
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Nahuatl1939 I think you're getting the words in the wrong order. Tá bróga air - He has shoes on/Shoes are on him. Tá air rith - he has to/must run.

In Hiberno-English - the dialect of English spoken in Ireland - people often say, 'It is on him to X' meaning, 'He has to/must X'.

I hope this helps.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

Why isn't "There are shoes on him"correct ??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Niall304641
Niall304641
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FGB referenced, I think we all need to understand Gaeilge is an immensely ancient language and it's very likely fine-tuning of communication is not a thing. I can think of two other ways to say this, but at the end of the day the language has seen better days (F*** England). One can only wonder if the differences were there in the past. Of course, as a learner I am sure I am wrong. Though i am confident in my grammar so I believe there may be many ways to say something. Likewise, some things you just cant say in Gaeilge. It is fascinating but really hurts the head.

4 months ago
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