1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Danish
  4. >
  5. "Manden spiser et æble."

"Manden spiser et æble."

Translation:The man eats an apple.

August 27, 2014

37 Comments

Sorted by top post

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minhtriet2704

Is the letter D silent in "Manden"?

August 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/walde22

Yes, the same goes for the d in "kvinden". They often are, which will take some getting used to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schatzie

It sounds to me like there is a glottal stop for the "d."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoaoDSouza

nah, glottal stops are voiced.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minhtriet2704

I got it, thank you for the answer :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/millermj

Why is there no -t at the end of æble?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JordanBorisov

Because when you put -t in the end of æble, it becomes 'the apple', not just an apple.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/millermj

Ahh, got it. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angry_donut

I like this language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kreilyn

So you ese ET when the next word start with a vocale..?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoaoDSouza

vocale is called vowel in English. But, no. Et is used with et-words and en with en-words. Et-words are of neuter gander and en-words of common gender.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RicardoCru604628

Could spiser be translated to "eats" instead of "is eating"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmiRetr0

yeah i'm concerned aboit this one too. How should we know when to translate spiser to "is eating" or "eats".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RicardoCru604628

I guess it's similar to my language... In Portuguese (as it's spoken in Portugal), we never use the "is eating" form. Instead, it's based on context. If I say "Julia eats fruit now", then it's the same as "Julia is eating fruit". If I say "Julia typically eats fruit", then I am just making a general fact.

(By the way, Portuguese does have a "is eating" form, we just never use it in Portugal, but it's used in other countries like Brazil. In Portugal, we use the context, like I guess they do in Danish.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viola759750

Yes, it is the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoaoDSouza

aeble is apple. Et aeble is an apple. Aeblet is the apple.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SomeshS.

n woow! hw much languages r u learning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoaoDSouza

I want to be a hyperpolyglot, and I am just 16. So, I thought, "Why not?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VenusGermanorum

Is the tense of 'spiser' similar to the present simple (he eats an apple; in general) or present continuous/progressive (he is eating an apple; right this moment) in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RicardoCru604628

Yes, more precisely it means "a".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thressia001

quelqu'un parle Français ici silvous plait


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaudiaCap906052

Do mand and manden sound different?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viola759750

Yes. "Mand" sounds almost like "man", whereas "manden" sounds more like "man + the beginning of ENcourage" if that makes any sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mairead1916

is it definate or indefinate . What indications can tell me the difference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viola759750

"En mand" means "a man". "Manden" means "the man".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarryFlash4

If I write "aeble" duolingo says I have a typo. Does duolingo not fully-accept "ae" in place of "æ"?This is weird because duolingo accepts "oe" for "ø".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aine666

It might be because "oe" is sometimes used in danish instead of "ø", while you would never find "ae" instead of "æ" written anywhere. That's just my guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarryFlash4

Really? My Danish friend often uses ae in place of æ if that key is not available (she works in Australia with me). Also see this link: https://www.fyidenmark.com/danish-alphabet.html The Danish alphabet is derived from the Indo European languages and is part of the Germanic languages. It using the standard English alphabet plus 3 extra vowels not found in the English language.

They are: å/æ/ø. They can also be written this way or this way☺: aa for å, ae for æ and oe for ø.

But I suppose aa for å is more common as that didn't even become an official part of the Danish alphabet until after WW2.

But no matter. I'll just have to remember to toggle my keyboard to a Danish one when using Duolingo (or writing Danish in general).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VicenteMar255666

I just don't get this right because I dind't put the “Eat”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VicenteMar255666

I'm the only one who are learning Swedish because I like The Vikings?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Silvia490934

Why it is not accepted the present continuous?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eric714808

Hiw eo you pronounce manden vs maenden? Glottal sroos and evrything. I need help.

Learn Danish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.