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  5. "The peach and the sweets are…

"The peach and the sweets are in the fridge."

Translation:Tá an phéitseog agus na milseáin sa chuisneoir.

August 27, 2014

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erchenswine

I'm confused... 'phéitseog' is the answer but the dictionary hints only list 'péitseog'? Is there a difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UaSirideain

Feminine nouns are lenited (add a 'h') if the noun follows a definite article (an). Péitseog = peach; An phéitseog = the peach. The only difference is in pronunciation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/torowan

There being a (f) peach causes lenition in fridge? There are four words between ' phéitseog' and 'chuisneoir'; how far across a sentence can lenition be caused - by any of the words in the phrase leading up to to the object?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UaSirideain

'Sa' also causes lenition on the word that follows, whether feminine or masculine.

Cuisneoir; sa chuisneoir.


[deactivated user]

    Hold up can someone tell me why its an pHéitseog but not na mHilseáin ... Basically i want to know why there isnt a h is milseáin


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1446

    The h is called a séimhiú in Irish, or "lenition" in English.

    In the nominative case, Feminine nouns (like péitseog) are lenited after the singular definite article an.

    Milseáin isn't lenited because it isn't feminine, and even if it was, it doesn't come after the singular definite article an, it comes after the plural definite article na.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Momentum500

    Wait but I thought this was some other case not the nominative case


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Momentum500

    Wait no, i was getting these mixed up because the nomitive case is at the end of a sentence when you use the verb "Is" instead of "Tá"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dar...

    My audio seems to have more or less ended on iPhone and mac except for very rare exceptions; and I'm too old to remember the spoken Irish (Connaught) I heard as a child. Can you still 'hear' lenition in spoken Gaeilge, or is this just book Irish for the sake of trad'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1446

    Lenition is very much part of spoken Irish - learners sometimes forget it, but in most cases lenition is not a subtle effect, and not doing it is very obvious, even jarring.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardByrne95

    The online dictionary https://www.focloir.ie/ has the three main dialects available for each word. Just click on the 'C' to hear the Connaught accent, 'M' for Munster and 'U' for Ulster.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NancyAnn11

    I am confused about maaculine and feminine as how is peach or fridge or sweet either .


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    Grammatical genders such as “masculine” and “feminine” are simply noun classes; they are unrelated to biological sex.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cibigi5

    Why is it not san gcuisneoir ? THE fridge???


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1446

    Because the combination of i and an is just sa, and it causes lenition, not eclipsis. sa chuisneoir is "in THE fridge".

    sa does become san before a word that starts with a vowel sound, but that's not relevant in this case.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SdPDcJpm

    How can i determine if i'm in front of a feminine or masculine word?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    If there’s no grammatical hint shown in the word, e.g. a non-genitive noun being lenited after the article an, then you could refer to a dictionary.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emily148235

    if youre saying 'the fridge' it should be 'an cuisneoir', yeah?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1446

    i combines with an and becomes sa, so "in the fridge" is sa chuisneoir.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RozieToez

    What gender is "milseáin"? Wouldn't it be lenited as "mhilseáin" after the article "na"? Or is it only lenited after the singular article "an"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bobbirf

    It's both reasons. Only the singular article "an" causes lenition. And milsea'n is masculine.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    Note that an will lenite a singular masculine genitive noun, e.g. Tá sé ag ithe an mhilseáin (“He is eating the sweet”) — milseáin is both the genitive singular form and the nominative plural form.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alan290737

    Milseáin is masculine. Only singular feminie nouns are lenited after a definite article


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1446

    Milseáin is plural. Plural nouns aren't lenited in the nominative case, whether they are masculine or feminine.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mayowa234

    When do you use an and na


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    Na is used with plural nouns and with feminine genitive singular nouns; an is used with other singular nouns.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maple_Nut

    It says "an chuisneoir" but it won't take "the fridge"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    This is an English-to-Irish exercise, so it will only accept an Irish translation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CathleenSc2

    I'm now confused. When is an and when is na used for the pronoun "the"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Violet237861

    An is for singular nouns, na is for plural


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PetitNuage97

    Is there a difference in pronunciation between the singular milseán and the plural milseáin? I don't really hear the difference


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1446

    There is a difference in the quality of the broad n in milseán and the slend n in milseáin, but it is easy to miss.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithnaki

    whats the differnce between milseain and mhilseain


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diarmaid867395

    I'm trying to grasp the reason why in the above sentence, péitseog has a seimhiú, whilst milseáin doesn't ? I think it has to do with gender, but I find it hard to make my mind up when it takes one or it doesn't ? Is it a set of rules that you apply effortlessly, when you have memorised them ? Diarmaid.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeoffMcHarg

    Is there some rule to tell feminine from masculine or do you have to remember the specific words? If there is a rule I think I missed it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
    Mod
    • 1446

    There is no single, simple rule. There are some guidelines that will allow you to get the gender right most of the time.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanFergus208993

    Why isn't milsean lenitioned with an H? isn't it feminine?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VioletaND

    "The peach" is "an phéitseog" and "the sweets" is "na misleáin". When do you use "an" and when do you use "na"? Is for singulars (an) and plurals (na)? Thank you.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SadDuoBird

    sa gcuisneoir... c'mon duolingo.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bobbirf

    I'm pretty sure from the hints and tips that sa gets lenition, not eclipsis, but I'm new to this. Can anyone confirm?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SadDuoBird

    In the connacht dialect of Irish 'sa' gets an urú i.e. sa gcuisneoir, sa mbaile ect... . I was just complaining that it doesn't account for this fact, even though to do so would be useless. I was being a special snowflake. :P


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdiWyatt

    "Special snowflake?" Awww! Cute!! Im stealing this!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    In the 2016 Caighdeán, either (den and don) or (sa) can also eclipse.

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