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  5. "Dia duit, Pól is ainm dom."

"Dia duit, Pól is ainm dom."

Translation:Hello, my name is Paul.

August 27, 2014

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

He’s Uachtarán na hÉireann — he needs no introduction!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChromateX

Wouldn't it be "an Uachtarán"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

No, it would not.

Apart from the fact that uachtarán is masculine, so it become an tUachtarán after an in the nominative, in a genitive phrase like Uachtarán na hÉireann the definite article in the middle governs the whole phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MylesGalla2

"Do Mheiriceánach, cosúil liomsa, a dhéanann sé"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MylesGalla2

To an American like me, he does ;P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burkey0

You gotta accept "Hello, Pól is my name"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeMaitre

Why doesn't the structure here work as "Is Pól ainm dom"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

When stating a first name (or first and last name) with ainm dom, the name is always emphasized; the shift of the name to the beginning of the sentence is how it’s emphasized.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bryan.EDU

"Is mise Pol" is another way to say "my name is Paul," correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Is mise Paul means "I am Paul" - it's not exactly "another way to say "my name is Paul"".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimeforTola

It is another way but "Pól is ainm dom" would be more commonly used


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pampelius

Why is dhuit considered a typo when she clearly says dhuit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Because the Caighdeán spelling is duit, even when pronounced dhuit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reggaelizard

Dia duit, is Uachtarán na hÉireann mé.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alan290737

Ná bí ag éisteach le pól. Tá sé ina chónaí sa chuisneoir leis na cailíní bándearga agus an eilifint.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Czesiunia

Why is 'hello' OK here but 'hi' is not accepted for Dia duit?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimeforTola

Technically hi is "haigh" in Irish but both should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dark.neverland

In other lessons "hello to you" is accepted for "dia duit" but in this one it's wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vera_jimull

Dia is Muire duit, a Phól! =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davesavethebrave

Isn't it Is mise Pol?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Is mise Pól means "I'm Paul".

Pól is ainm dom can be either "My name is Paul" or "Paul is my name".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teragthe2nd

So, why wasn't it accepted when I said "Hello, Paul is my name"? It should be!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

English speakers don't usually introduce themselves with "Hello, ... is my name". "Hello, my name is ..." is preferred. In other circumstances "... is my name" might be preferred.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatherineB316776

would "is pól mo ainm" work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnstoney

I think, SatharnPHL, you should explain why. Clearly it should be "m'ainm" rather than "mo ainm". But is there a grammatical reason why one could not say "is Pól m'ainm"? Also, it is necessary to explain the grammatical structure of "Pól is ainm dom": as I understand it, this is literally "[it is] Pól [that] is my name", as one does not usually put words before the Irish "is".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

I could explain why you're getting it wrong if you could explain why you think is Pól m'ainm is correct.

But this isn't a theoretical example, it's a practical one. Irish speakers say Pól is ainm dom where English speakers say "My name is Paul". Even if "is pól mo ainm" was grammatically valid, it wouldn't "work", because that's not what Irish speakers say in a situation where English speakers say "My name is Paul", just as buí doesn't work when an English speaker says "blue".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnstoney

There are things which Irish speakers don't usually say which are grammatically valid, e.g. "féadaim" instead of "is féidir liom". But why can you say "is dochtúir mé" and not "is Pól m'ainm"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

The rules for structuring a classification sentence and an identification sentence are not the same. "My name is Paul" is not a classification.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.g.doyle

Could someone explain "dom" in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnstoney

'Dom' means to or for me, just as 'duit' means to or for you (singular).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricHuckva1

The web site suggested that the right answer was '"Hey, my name is Paul' That is a very recent colloquial form in english. You would only use 'hey' in certain circumstances, and with certain people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.g.doyle

Could someone explain "ainm dom"? I would expect something like "m'ainm"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

This is one of those things where Irish and English do different things, and where English says "My name is Paul/Paul is my name", Irish says Pól is ainm dom or Pól an t-ainm atá orm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bellish

Practised saying aloud with my own name as I thought it more useful, then went and typed my own name in the answer and got it wrong. Doh!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

Dia duit, Daéibh is ainm dom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marts456777

Please, please, PLEASE, its Dia dHuit -h h h h


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

The defacto standard dictionaries, Ó Dónaill's Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, and Foras na Gaeilge's New English Irish-Dictionary, both prefer Dia duit.

de Bhaldraithe's older English-Irish Dictionary does give Dia dhuit, but there is no question that Dia duit is now the "standard" way to spell this phrase, even if you pronounce it as though it was Dia dhuit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnstoney

The spelling hallo is at least as common as hello

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