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  5. "Tá fáilte romhat!"

" fáilte romhat!"

Translation:You are welcome!

August 27, 2014

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cooker3

Oh memories of school when anytime someone came into the classroom we would have to say in unison Ta failte romhat isteach


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maple.Staple

May i ask what that translates to?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1446

Isteach means "in" so tá fáilte romhat isteach is "welcome in", though you might be more likely to say "Please do come in" or such in English, the clear implication is that you have stepped into a specific room or building, rather than a general welcome on arrival at a place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nagaera

How exactly should the mh be pronounced?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paddyobrien

It takes a soft "w" sound here. So something between "rowat" and "rote". How much you want to emphasise the "w" sound is fairly optional.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ballygawley

In DL Irish, there is always a blue "sound" icon at the top of the discussion page, which quite freqently (one out of three to four?) gives a sound sample (as is on this page as well).

Now the quality of the speaker is considered extremely poor by the experts, but I still appreciate a poor indication more than no indication at all. From where I come, "romhat" would be pronounced (and silently read) as the english "rum hat", which definitely is much worse, than the poor indication.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

You only get the sound icon on this page if the exercise also had audio, so it depends each time whether you'll see it or not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hpfan5

DL = Donegal/Dún na nGal ... what are the other dialects? (Pronunciations and/or different meanings)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ballygawley

DL = duolingo, sorry ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CiaraSherry

Should the mh not make a v sound, like in Niamh?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paddyobrien

Not in this case, no. Sometimes "mh" coming after a vowel makes a "v" sound, other times a "w" sound - you just have to learn when learning the word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nutalina

But bh is always (from what i know) v


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paddyobrien

Welcome to my house would be "fáilte go dtí mo theach" or "fáilte chuig mo theach".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MauriceReeves

Is this "welcome" as in "Welcome to my house" or "welcome" as in "happy to do it?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexinIreland

This is used as "you are welcome" when someone thanks you (or, as you said, "happy to do it")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soupandbread

Funny, I was taught the opposite: Tá fáilte romhat/romhaibh' should only be used to welcome someone to a place, and for a response to 'go raibh maith agat,' that 'go ndéana a mhaith duit' was preferable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MauriceReeves

Also, "There is water in front of you" is "Tá uisce romhat." How are the two sentences connected?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

The literal translation of Tá fáilte romhat is There is a welcome in front of you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2289

Is "romhat" for the singular "you"? What would the declension be for the plural "you"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

Well spotted, romhat is before you (singular), while romhaibh is before you (plural).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hpfan5

When they list the different word translations under a english word ...they should put (sgl) or (pl) -singular or plural- next to the possible translations to better understand the different words because theyre not synonyms


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2289

Go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MauriceReeves

Awesome! Thanks so much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hpfan5

Like ... people are waiting for you - on your way to a certain location?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ladron

is the difference between romhat and agat one of "this is offered to you/before you" as opposed to "you have/at you"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataltane

Through the magic of idioms.

Also: prepositions in any language are pretty much untranslatable. You just have to accept the way they're used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hpfan5

Idioms & prepositions may not exactly be translatable into modern english but long-winded kind of old english.. but still inderstood when fully explained :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenaCapaillUisce

Why is romhat used, rather thatn agat, or duit? As I understand: Romhat=before you Duit=to you Agat=at you/with you

Am I correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaraelDraconis

I'm aware that this is not common modern English usage but I would read this (and other "singular-you are" constructs) with a "thou art". Quaker. Plain speech. All that. Plus it distinguishes singular from plural, especially if one ignores the bleedin' silly T-V distinction that we got mostly from the French. Unfortunately DL does not appear to approve.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattNorlie

Romt is pronounced root correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesRichardson2

That's how it sounds to me too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

yes, that's the typical Connemara pronunciation. Sometimes even close to English 'rude'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mamc97

Is anyone able to give me a basic breakdown of Irish pronunciations? Its really tripping me up


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1446

This video is a helpful place for beginners to get started.

There is a link to a handout in the comments of the that video.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelly_3183

Sadly at this point the link is no longer functional :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1446

The link is still functional.

It's a link to a YouTube video called "Sounds and Spelling of Irish / Fuaimniú & Litriú na Gaeilge". If you can't follow links, go to YouTube and search for it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/denisespain

welcome - as in welcome to you . does it not mean this ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricHuckva1

I keep getting this one wrong - romhat always sounds like duit via my computer!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EoinBarry2

Why is "your welcome" not accepted as an answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1446

"your" is a possessive adjective - do or bhur in Irish.

"you're" is a contraction of "you are".

"Your welcome" vs "you're welcome" is like "my welcome" vs "I'm welcome"

tá fáilte romhat means "you are welcome", or "you're welcome".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickDal411630

Should your welcome also be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1446

"your" is a possessive adjective - the 2nd person equivalent of "my". The Irish for "your" is do in the singular and bhur in the plural, and the Irish for "your welcome" would be d'fháilte or bhur bhfáilte.

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