"Tá fáilte romhat!"

Translation:You are welcome!

4 years ago

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cooker3

Oh memories of school when anytime someone came into the classroom we would have to say in unison Ta failte romhat isteach

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paddyobrien
paddyobrien
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Welcome to my house would be "fáilte go dtí mo theach" or "fáilte chuig mo theach".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nagaera

How exactly should the mh be pronounced?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paddyobrien
paddyobrien
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It takes a soft "w" sound here. So something between "rowat" and "rote". How much you want to emphasise the "w" sound is fairly optional.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nagaera

Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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In DL Irish, there is always a blue "sound" icon at the top of the discussion page, which quite freqently (one out of three to four?) gives a sound sample (as is on this page as well).

Now the quality of the speaker is considered extremely poor by the experts, but I still appreciate a poor indication more than no indication at all. From where I come, "romhat" would be pronounced (and silently read) as the english "rum hat", which definitely is much worse, than the poor indication.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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You only get the sound icon on this page if the exercise also had audio, so it depends each time whether you'll see it or not.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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DL = Donegal/Dún na nGal ... what are the other dialects? (Pronunciations and/or different meanings)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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DL = duolingo, sorry ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CiaraSherry

Should the mh not make a v sound, like in Niamh?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paddyobrien
paddyobrien
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Not in this case, no. Sometimes "mh" coming after a vowel makes a "v" sound, other times a "w" sound - you just have to learn when learning the word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauriceReeves
MauriceReeves
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  • 1561

Is this "welcome" as in "Welcome to my house" or "welcome" as in "happy to do it?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexinIreland
alexinIreland
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This is used as "you are welcome" when someone thanks you (or, as you said, "happy to do it")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupandbread

Funny, I was taught the opposite: Tá fáilte romhat/romhaibh' should only be used to welcome someone to a place, and for a response to 'go raibh maith agat,' that 'go ndéana a mhaith duit' was preferable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauriceReeves
MauriceReeves
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Also, "There is water in front of you" is "Tá uisce romhat." How are the two sentences connected?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
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The literal translation of Tá fáilte romhat is There is a welcome in front of you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Is "romhat" for the singular "you"? What would the declension be for the plural "you"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
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Well spotted, romhat is before you (singular), while romhaibh is before you (plural).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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When they list the different word translations under a english word ...they should put (sgl) or (pl) -singular or plural- next to the possible translations to better understand the different words because theyre not synonyms

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Go raibh maith agat!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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Like ... people are waiting for you - on your way to a certain location?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauriceReeves
MauriceReeves
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Awesome! Thanks so much.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ladron
Ladron
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is the difference between romhat and agat one of "this is offered to you/before you" as opposed to "you have/at you"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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Through the magic of idioms.

Also: prepositions in any language are pretty much untranslatable. You just have to accept the way they're used.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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Idioms & prepositions may not exactly be translatable into modern english but long-winded kind of old english.. but still inderstood when fully explained :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mesweet10

This is hard

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annabel.G

Are you irish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LenaCapaillUisce

Why is romhat used, rather thatn agat, or duit? As I understand: Romhat=before you Duit=to you Agat=at you/with you

Am I correct?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamanthaTheIrish

its kind of hard....but I've already started to get used to remember stuff! (and I've started bringing a note card with me that says Irish things so I can talk to people....and I think the language for Irish is called gaelic)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarthPontifex

In english, this language (that we're learning) is just called "Irish". In Irish, this language is "Gaeilge".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/denisespain

welcome - as in welcome to you . does it not mean this ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaraelDraconis

I'm aware that this is not common modern English usage but I would read this (and other "singular-you are" constructs) with a "thou art". Quaker. Plain speech. All that. Plus it distinguishes singular from plural, especially if one ignores the bleedin' silly T-V distinction that we got mostly from the French. Unfortunately DL does not appear to approve.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EricHuckva1

I keep getting this one wrong - romhat always sounds like duit via my computer!!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jolie393967

I thought she said "that fart tickled" 0-0

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mamc97

Is anyone able to give me a basic breakdown of Irish pronunciations? Its really tripping me up

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

This video is a helpful place for beginners to get started.

There is a link to a handout in the comments of the that video.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattNorlie

Romt is pronounced root correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesRichardson2

That's how it sounds to me too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

yes, that's the typical Connemara pronunciation. Sometimes even close to English 'rude'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MidnightCthulhu

The voice sounds so aggressive...

3 years ago
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