"Hello. Hello to you too."

Translation:Dia duit. Dia is Muire duit.

4 years ago

109 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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I'm laughing right now because I had this as a multiple-choice and one of the wrong answers was "Muire duit. Muire is Muire duit." - "Mary to you! Mary and Mary to you!"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AGreatUserName
AGreatUserName
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It would be REALLY good to have the pronunciation for this. Otherwise it's just memorising a string of letters that you're sure will be pronounced a different way entirely.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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Frequently even if the pronounciation is not given up front it is given on top of the discussion page, just as the blue Icon on top of this discussion thread.

When in doubt please do utilize this great resource:

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/fuaim/Comhghairdeas

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
Telisa7
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Wow. This is indeed a great resource. Thank you so much for that. I usually recommend forvo, but I like the way this one is so specific.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coinneach10

The problem may be with me. I do not get any way to listen to audio of this particular clause. Not in the lesson, and not in this thread. Could the problem be that I use the mobile app? I do believe to remember that other threads had this feature. Do you know anything about it?

The source is great indeed.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huffdogg

We have it now.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShAnEiSqUeeN

Dia gwit. diasmuragwit

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaoiseMcHale

Dee a gwit. Dee a iss murra gwit

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1musketieragain

I'm wondering, do we know what they said before they became christians?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Google to the rescue, twice! Once to find the link and once to have a cached link because the site isn't responding at the moment.
Click here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jesrad

TL;DR: something close to 'Sé do bheatha'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian378304

I Like your picture rae.f

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JOSEPH935918

Probably pagan.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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I'm pretty sure they didn't say "Pagan" as a greeting to each other.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LisBohnert

I've heard Celtic Reconstructionist pagans (or whatever you'd like to call them) use “déithe duit/daoibhe”, but I'm pretty sure that's just a plural “dia duit/daoibhe” (gods instead of God) rather than the other way around.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Norzer
Norzer
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It doesn't mean "hello", it just doesn't! Some people use it in place of hello, people in Connemara say "haigh". Other people in other regions say "hello" in different ways.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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“Hello” has more than one meaning. Its “greeting” meaning is translatable by Dia duit (and Dia daoibh), according to both the EID and the NEID.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ciaratiara

There are 3 different pronunciations for daoibh. Can it be presumed that the bh is pronounced "v"? Is the d that sort of 'hard g but not really there" sound or is it actually a d sound?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conor.raff
conor.raff
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At school (in Ulster) I was taught daoibh was pronounced with a "d" sound at the start (something like "deeve"). But our teacher was teaching the Donegal pronunciation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flan2784

Where is the "too" coming from? Are we in English adding the "too" because we're assuming that there's a second person and that's why hello is being said twice? Or does one of those words actually mean "too" in Irish? If the literal translation is "God to you. God and Mary to you." then it seems it would be more correct for the English to be "Hi. Hello." or something along those lines.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IuileanMGabhann

It’s a dialogue, although that’s not very clear from the way it’s presented. “Dia d(h)uit” is the standard way of greeting someone, and “Dia is Muire d(h)uit” is the standard way of replying to a greeting. So one person is saying “Hello”, and the other one is replying with “Hello to you too”. I suppose in any real life exchange the second speaker could just as well just repeat the “Hello”, but this is a translation exercice, and so “Hello to you too” is the best translation that makes the difference between the two explicit.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gerry834979

Hello Sarah and Julian. I felt like I had to come in here and add this. Sarah, I acknowledge your question. To both; up ' till now the exercises were "Hello! Hello to you"; so "Dia dhuit! Dia is Mhuire dhuit. All very well. HOWEVER, for ME seeing "too" written there, I would of normally and quite naturally put "freisin" (accent on the "e") - meaning "also" at the end. This is because this sentence includes "too" where it didn't before and "also" roughly equates to "too". OR I had couple of bad Irish teachers growing up!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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I agree that the English version provided is not particularly common. Feel free to suggest more idiomatic translations.

To your question, yes. This is meant to be an exchange. The first party says "Dia duit/daoibh" and the second party replies with "Dia is Muire duit/daoibh".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/steenson86

Surely dia is mhuire duit is also acceptable?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IuileanMGabhann

No, ‘is’ (or the word it is an abbreviation of, ‘agus’) does not trigger lenition.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pfk3

I think what steenson86 is asking is why is only "Dia 's Muire duit" marked as correct and "Dia 's Mhuire duit" marked incorrect. At least I thought it marked "Dia 's Mhuire duit" incorrect for me but I might have unintentionally omitted the space before the apostrophe also.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarthNox

How is this differentiated form the plural?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnLonDubhBeag

The plural would be:

Dia daoibh. Dia is Muire daoibh

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarthNox

That's what I entered for this question and it counted it incorrect. My problem was identifying the phrase as being singular or plural in English. "Hello. Hello to you too", by itself indicates neither singular nor plural.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Report it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mickor85

I just reported it as from the start I am being told the singular way...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BanUlchabhan

This translation seems a bit misleading, since "to you too" or "you as well" would be "tú féin." Perhaps it would be less confusing if the translation was "Hello." "Hello"(repsonse)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
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It accepts "hello. hello."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zesty_Crunch
Zesty_Crunch
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That's good, but I don't see why "Hello to you too" is listed as a translation at all.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mayrose64

dia

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shrikrishna1
shrikrishna1
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How to pronounce '"Dia daoibh. Dia is Muire daoibh"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BRyeO12
BRyeO12Plus
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https://www.duolingo.com/Lachym15
Lachym15
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I believe it's "Dia du-ib. Dia is Mweereh du-ib."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShAnEiSqUeeN

Nah, you're way off

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SineadByrne0

does it have to be a capital for ' muire'?????

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
Lancet
Mod
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Yes, this is a proper noun (the same way that "Mary" requires a capital in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan854540

I assume that Dia must also be capitalized since it, too, is a proper noun.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaKaris

Why does "Dia is Muire duit" mean "God and Mary to you?" Does "is" mean "and?" I thought "and" was "agus."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zachis
Zachis
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Yes, "is" also means "and". It is a fairly common substitute for "agus" in casual speech.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaKaris

Thank you. Good to know.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Norzer
Norzer
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"is" is a shortened form of "agus", sometimes also written just 's

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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If this is the same question/sentence before/previously ... why are comments not carried over?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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I don't understand what you're asking.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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couldn't edit on mobile I didn't realize the mistake.. why are comments not carried over from the same question if they are repeated?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Ah. I've noticed that, too. It seems there are multiple pages for seemingly the same question. I don't know why it's set up that way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShannonH.
ShannonH.
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Is there a standard way to pronounce "dia duit"? I've heard different pronunciations: "dee-ya gwet", "dee-ya gwech" "jee-ya rhet (like a French "r"), "dee-ya rich (French "r").

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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No. Those are how each of the three major dialects pronounce it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShannonH.
ShannonH.
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So all of these are correct? Or should I remember the way it's pronounced in duolingo?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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They're all correct for their respective dialects. As for which to go with, that depends on why you're learning Irish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robloxian_Kitten

How would "Dia duit, Dia is Muire duit" be "Dia daoibh. Dia is Muire daoibh." or "Dia daoibh. Dia is Muire duit."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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"duit" is the singular. You're addressing one person. "daoibh" is the plural. You're addressing more than one person.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Felicitas757086

I had three choices: "Dia duit. - Dia is Muire duit.", "Dia daoibh. - Dia is Muire daoibh." and "Dia daoibh. - Dia agus Muire daoibh." I thought that "is" and "agus" both mean and. So why is the third version marked wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Perhaps because people don't actually say "agus" in this greeting.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaTechGal

I think this is a mistake.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Genoms

It is correct. The problem is this is a modernized form of a old saying for hello. The direction translation is is shown if you hover over the word, which are "God to you. God and Mary to you.'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duggie22

hello

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaisyJaneW

Killarney pronounce: dee-ya gwich. Close I can come in Bearla sound. Sorry. Think it depend what part of country and how much traditional speech the family still own after many generation of change and British (English) tamperings.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Frigorifico9
Frigorifico9
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what is the literal meaning of this phrase?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Literally, it's "God to you. God and Mary to you."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Strobro3
Strobro3
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Is there any rhyme or reason to spelling in this language or is completely random?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Norzer
Norzer
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It's actually quite consistent within each of the dialects. The trouble is that there really is no standard form of the spoken language. The standard written language was established in the 60s when they modernised the language, replaced the séimhiú with a "h" (lenition used to be denoted by a dot) and replaced the old script with a Roman script. The upshot of this is that a lot of the words, although now written in a standardised form, are still pronounced in the local style depending on where you are. The spelling and pronunciation of the language as we were taught it at school are completely consistent with one another, but, alas, the "school" Irish is not spoken anywhere outside of school.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Irish spelling is very rule-driven. It's just that the rules are very different than the ones in English.

This video should help: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIokUII7LX0

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tomboraas
tomboraas
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Video is great! Thanks!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VariusKidd
VariusKidd
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Multiple choice has "Dia daoibh. Dia is Muire duit." As one of the answers. Wrote that in the free type section and it was counted wrong. Why?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Assuming you typed everything correctly, that sounds like a glitch. If it happens again, you should report it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VariusKidd
VariusKidd
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Thanks so much. Am I correct in assuming the first greeting is more formal than the second? Or is this about the number of people being addressed. I am, of course referring to the difference between "daoibh" and "duit".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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I don't think Irish has the formal/informal the way Spanish, French, or Italian do.

"duit" is singular, "daoibh" is plural.


Irish prepositional pronouns

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VariusKidd
VariusKidd
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Go raibh maith agat! This helps so much.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Tá failte romhat!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielLon241406

So, would a more "literal" translation be: "God Bless!" "A Blessed Mary to you!" ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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No. The literal translation is "God to you!" "God and Mary to you!"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielLon241406

Guess my "'literal'" wasn't understood, perhaps I should have use "equivalent". "God to you" has no real meaning in English and from knowledge of English Christian sayings, "God Bless" would be the most likely equivalent. Now my knowledge of Catholicism is limited so any such sayings including Mary are only speculation on my part.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Yes, the equivalent in English is "Hello. Hello to you to." It's about context and usage. I know some evangelicals who use "Praise the lord!" as a greeting, but they're a minority. Usually, a greeting is something like "hello" and it's not unusual to return it with "Hello to you too".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gaydani

Why is "Muire" capitalized and what does it mean?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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"Dia duit/daoibh. Dia is Muire duit/daoibh" is a highly idiomatic greeting and response. It literally means "God to you. God and Mary to you."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielLon241406

Mary

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeeganMuth

I thought Muire was Mary. I'm confused on why its used here.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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As has been explained on this page before...

The greeting is highly idiomatic in Irish. Literally translated, the first person says "God to you" and the next person replies "God and Mary to you". But in terms of usage, it is equivalent to the English "Hello" and replies to that.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nathan85554

Is it wrong to do.Dia duit.Dia duit duitse freisin.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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This separate resource agrees with Duolingo:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sw5EKb6pLg4

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IrishSelkie

How do we know which conjugation they want us to use if they give the prompt in English? Like: Hello to you means "Dia daoibh", but Hello to you also means "Dia duit." It probably doesn't matter which way you respond, but I am wondering if there is some difference...

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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There are no verbs here, so the issue is not conjugation.

Irish has prepositional pronouns. It's a fusion of prepositions with personal pronouns.

Irish also has a singular and plural "you".

The greeting exchange literally translates as -"God to you." -"God and Mary to you." It's the "to you" that varies depending on whether you're addressing one person or more than one person.

Check out the rest of the comments on this page for more details.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IrishSelkie

Thank you.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucRom5

Dosn't Muire mean Mary?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucRom5

Muire is Mary and the sentence has nothing to do with Mary.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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The English "good-bye" is short for "God be with you". Greetings based on religious language are very old and become fossilized.

"Dia duit/daoibh" literally means "God to you".
"Dia is Muire duit/daoibh" literally means "God and Mary to you".

But idioms don't mean what they look like on the surface. In Irish, this is the equivalent of "Hello" -- "Hello to you, too".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michele945364

Why is "is" used instead of "agus", if it translates to "God and Mary to you?"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Here, "is" is short for "agus".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FranOToole

There is no mention of Mary in the question

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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The greeting is highly idiomatic in Irish. Literally translated, the first person says "God to you" and the next person replies "God and Mary to you". But in terms of usage, it is equivalent to the English "Hello" and replies to that.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EiderSkins

Where does Mary come in to this? "Hello. Hello to you too"?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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It's a highly formalized expression. Literally, it means "Mary to you. God and Mary to you." But as far as usage goes, it's the equivalent of "Hello. Hello to you, too."

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eamonn131259

Wtf

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erry369
Erry369
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This is an incorrect translation technically. "Muire" or "Mary" has nothing to do with Hello and Hello to you too. Sorry Duo, you might want to check that.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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It's a highly idiomatic greeting. The translation is correct.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sw5EKb6pLg4

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShAnEiSqUeeN

No, you are the wrong one. Get your facts right.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arthur339941

If Irish were alive and thriving it would by now have developed a secular vernacular. Once upon a time in English we might have said "May God's blessing shine upon this hour of our meeting, stranger" or something similar, but nowadays we have modernized, simplified and secularized to "hi" or "hello". For an atheist or Muslim to have to say "Dia duit. Dia is Muire duit" feels about as awkward as an Irishman having to say "As-salamu alaykum'!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pfk3

I think if you actually spend the time to learn the language and speak it with native or learned speakers in Ireland, you will find that people greet each other in a myriad of secular ways. This is simply a greeting you might hear and is an historic greeting which every speaker should know.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1147714167

O.OO.OO.OO.OO.OU_U<sub>___</sub>

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisa664429

Why is Muire in this question??

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Read the comments on this page and your question will be answered.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NourAlFalo1

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oguL17

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8 months ago
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