"Sú talún, úll agus oráiste."

Translation:A strawberry, an apple and an orange.

4 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/s0lolol

Would anyone care to go into the etymology of Strawberry here, I mean, ground juice? floor sap? Land Sugar? It seems an odd one.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnLonDubhBeag

Sú also means "a red berry":

Sú talún = A ground red berry = strawberry

Sú craobh = A branch red berry = raspberry

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lariwestside
lariwestside
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Thank you! I was so confused when "juice" was marked wrong at the end of the sentence and was wondering where the "sú" had gone.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dovyuruk
Dovyuruk
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Ahhhhhh. This was like my Eureka moment.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CappyMcBrit

So i wasn't terribly wrong to guess 'land'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirbs94

Is the oxford comma not used in Irish or was the lack thereof just by preference of the author? If it is used, I think this phrase would be a little clearer as "Sú talún, úll, agus oráiste.". I got a bit confused as to why the poor strawberry was being separated from the apple and the orange! At least for the purposes of translating an unfamiliar syntax, I think it would help.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CoRigazio
CoRigazio
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I was wondering the same thing. See, in my native tongue (Spanish) the use of a comma AFTER the word "úll" (apple) in this sentence would be wrong. Maybe it's the same in Irish...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vrixton
Vrixton
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So... how would you say "strawberry juice" then? 'su su talun'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/enifish
enifish
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I /think/ it would be "sú sútha talún" but that's just a guess.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sean_Roy
Sean_RoyPlus
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Or maybe 'sú sú súideo.'

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/minilauren
minilauren
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Oxford commas should make things clearer. I found it useful here to delineate what word means what fruit versus another since strawberry in Gaeilge is two words

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MathLing
MathLing
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...walk into a bar.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LinguDemo
LinguDemo
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This is the first time I hear of a language that uses two words for "strawberry". XD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MathLing
MathLing
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Well, so does English, in a certain sense. The main difference is that English spells it as one word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LinguDemo
LinguDemo
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Yeah, I can see. I think Irish is the first language I know that officially uses 2 words for that, though. Keyword being, officially.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nic228862

I suppose strawberry is just a composite of straw and berry, so not too far off two words, either? Just a quirky point: The southern German dialect of Allemanisch describes potatoes as "Earth-apples". Strawberries are "Earth-berries" in German. The words are often combined into one descriptive term but the original idea of separate words used to describe a new item remain. Off to more Irish now...

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blackClydesdale2

The irish translation for stawberry just confuses me, and i have learned to accept that i will probably say it wrong if i ever go to Ireland and want to have a strawberry. I know it sounds retarded, but yeah. That's how I am. Surprisingly, the rest of the language is fairly easy.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/torowan
torowan
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"The rest of the language is fairly easy"? Now that is crazy talk. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nic228862

Easy? Wish I had your brain!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/charkersh9

Why does strawberry have 2 words in it, and why is there not a comma after ull? Or like, maybe I'm wrong and that's just the grammar of the Irish language?... Arrggh!!! Someone just tell me?!?!?!?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mikemilg
Mikemilg
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Perhaps "Sú talún" should be highlighted, rather than just "talún"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mysteriam

Why did the A have to be there it didn't say there was an a with the translation of Su talun.... I just don't get it.. maybe its for guessing I guess?

1 year ago
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