"Labhraím Gaeilge."

Translation:I speak Irish.

4 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lorenagay
lorenagay
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Hahahaha!!!! Actually, I don't. And I am having a really hard time learning this.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Em7oaA

Lol, same here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endosymbiosis

I know in English that "I speak Irish" can mean both the act of speaking Irish and also the ability to speak Irish. Does this also apply in Irish? I was taught that the way you express an ability to speak Irish is "Tá an Ghaeilge agam" (or something like, can't remember exactly). But can you also use "Labhraím Gaeilge" to express the same thing?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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The way you were taught was correct. Ability to speak a language is expressed by "Tá _ agam".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Matheus467577

Yeah, like @smrch said, "Tá _ agam" stands for "I can speak " in this case, "Labhraím Gaeilge" lacks something, like "Labhraím Gaeilge ar maidin" (I speak irish in the morning)... but i'm not sure, i think it goes like that, like actually SAYING something

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kupferbart

My teacher in university taught us : "Tá cupla focal agam." (eng.: I have a few words.) to express that we speak (at least a bit) Irish. Worked like a charm in Ireland, and I hope the expression made the cut here, at least in one lesson :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suomi
Suomi
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I assume Gaeilge means only Irish the language. How would one say Irish the adjective?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnLonDubhBeag

Gaelach

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ruamac
ruamac
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This expression ticks me off so much. It should be, 'Tá Gaeilge agam,' - literally, 'I have Irish.'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Indeed. And there is a difference between Tá Gaeilge agam and Labhraím Gaeilge. The former means ability, whereas the latter means that you habitually speak Irish.

1 year ago

[deactivated user]

    Would it be correct to say "Tá Rúisís, Bealarúisis agus Úcráinis agam"? I want to put it in my profile description. :)

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ruamac
    ruamac
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    No, that wouldn't be correct as the term, 'Labhraim Gaeilge is incorrect.' You could say, 'Ta Rúisís Bealarúisís agus Úcráinis agam.' In Irish we talk about HAVING a language. When we say we SPEAK a language we're expressing that we speak it daily, or on certain occasions, etc.

    3 years ago

    [deactivated user]

      Thanks! I've actually read your previous answer and changed my sentence already. :D Good to know this version is correct!

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/ruamac
      ruamac
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      Tá failte romhat - You're welcome:) I have reported this fault to admin so hopefully they'll get around to changing it soon.

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/FoxyAuroraBat

      I love the chirping "R", especially in the word "Lasair", which is "Flame", I believe. :D

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/ladyashiri
      ladyashiri
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      Please, conjugate this verb!

      4 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Lancet
      Lancet
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      Here you go (click on "Present" in the drop-down menu).

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/DiegoJaviUnlam
      DiegoJaviUnlam
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      Thanks a lot Lancet! =)

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/remawar

      What drop down menu and where?

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/remawar

      Found it! Thank you!

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/TomWalsh7

      I can't find a drop down menu either.

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/remawar

      You click on the grey "Here you go". It will take you to an Irish dictionary website. You can't miss the drop down

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/DiegoJaviUnlam
      DiegoJaviUnlam
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      • 1001

      I want to really have the ability to do it! =)

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/hiruki8
      hiruki8
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      Why can't you say "I speak Gaelic"

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/TheJovianTitan

      Because Irish is never called Gaelic. Only Scottish Gaelic is referred to as such to differentiate it from the Scots language. Irish is always called Irish in English.

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/deserttitan

      Technically, you can in the US and Canada, as the Irish who came here called it that as time went on (Irish teachers from Ireland have also told me it's not incorrect here), and we have a rich tradition of calling it that throughout North America, but in Ireland when they say Gaelic they're either referring to Irish football or the Gaelic language of Scotland. Also, since there are three Gaelic languages: Gaeilge, Gàidhlig, and Gaelg, you're better off just calling it Irish, Irish Gaelic, or simply Gaeilge (the actual name).

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Judah791387

      Then why am I here if labhrain gaeilge?

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Grace419433

      Not yet at least...

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/GriffinBlo3

      So "Labhraím gaeilge" means the act of speaking Irish and "tá gaeilge agam" means the ability to speak Irish?

      4 months ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Grace23french

      isn't the correct way of saying the language of ireland, "gealic"?

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/PauBofill
      PauBofill
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      Well, "Gaelic" is the way it's called in English, but in Irish Gaelic it's called "Gaeilge".

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/TheJovianTitan

      It's just called Irish. On occasion you may here someone call it Irish gaelic to differentiate it from scottish gaelic(A closely related language) but besides that it's just Irish.

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/lolbitz

      XD LOL

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

      I am noodling around in the Irish language tree for the first time in a long while, and the new voice pronounces things SO VERY DIFFERENTLY from the old one!

      1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/GaegisLand

      How did you get English and Bearla? They are completely different! They had to make it so complicated...

      1 month ago
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