"Spiser han frokost?"

Translation:Is he eating lunch?

4 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lawchiyan
lawchiyan
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Might I ask how it came to be that 'frokost' meant breakfast in Norwegian and lunch in Danish? Caught me off guard, it did.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mokichan

German: Frühstück = Breakfast

Swedish: Frukost = Breakfast

Norwegian: Frokost = Breakfast

Danish: Frokost = Lunch... ?

I am just going to assume that Danish people are not early risers. ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/degeberg
degeberg
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My dictionary says that the etymology is from Low German "vrokost" (vrô=early, kost=meal). It also says "really the first meal" under etymology. I suppose the Norwegian meaning is more reasonable :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StefanoSolgreno
StefanoSolgreno
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I thought about the same.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/koshermal

Different people call different means 'dinner' in English, too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreiRaduTurcu

It does sound odd.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SabreeBlackmon

"He eats lunch?" was not accepted. I wonder if there is a reason for this?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sovay
sovay
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I don't think your answer is correct English. If someone said that to me, I would understand them to a degree, but it sounds awkward. "Does he eat lunch?" is a more natural possibility in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SabreeBlackmon

"He eats lunch?" and "Does he eat lunch?" have different meanings (to me anyway). I would ask "He eats lunch?" much like I would say "He's writing a book? I don't believe it!" I think it is fairly common to rhetorically ask things that way informally, especially with a verbal emphasis on the subject, "he" in this case, and a rising inflection -- it communicates a kind of surprise or disbelief, often when you are restating something just said to you, but as a question.

I assumed maybe there was a different way to do this in Danish, so that's why "He eats lunch?" was rejected, but as far as I know, it's a grammatically fine answer in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sovay
sovay
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Oh, I hear ya. I notice, though, that your second hypothetical example is in a different form than the first. "He's writing a book?" is different and performs a different function in that context than "He writes a book?"

I understand what you mean now, though. I'll leave it to native Danish speakers to answer the question of how they would translate your idea.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SabreeBlackmon

Indeed! I do agree though, and I think a better example would be something like saying, "He drives a motorcycle!?" after you see your boring boss drive away on his new sports bike after work :D

I'm not sure that kind of snarkiness would translate cleanly across languages but I am mighty curious now!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/punktart
punktart
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I put "He eats lunch?" and it was counted wrong; i know it's a little weird but its still a translation like cmon

1 year ago
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