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"Yo no tengo enemigos."

Translation:I do not have enemies.

5 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/brjaga
brjaga
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So would "frenemy" be "enamigo"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

I would be interested in knowing if there is a concept of a "frenemy" in Spanish

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SRP87

En español es "amienemigo".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JudieElisabeth

W hy will Duo no accept "any enemies"? That's more usual in English speech.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

I think that would be "No tengo nigún enemigo" or "No tengo ningunos enemigos" but I'm not sure. Edit; just checked with my Spanish teacher and she said the former is right, the second isn't incorrect but is very old fashioned and not used any more.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andres57sc
andres57sc
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"Ningunos enemigos" sound strange, nobody says that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/languagenerd007

The "correct" answer is "I have not got enemies".... This is terrible. It would be better to say I do not have enemies.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
Mod
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Hi, please use the button to report problems. The course creators don't read every comment to every sentence discussion, but they do get the reports. Thanks!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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what's an adversary?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ernewein

Another word for enemy... comes from the word adverse meaning opposite or anti

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

enemigAS?? Is the word not able to be made feminine? Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mariacrist900597

I think the better way to translate in english " i do not have enemy" instead of "i have not got enemy". It sounds weird?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VanessaJ101

Both of those options would be correct if you use "enemies".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Correct is "I have no enemies" -- accepted by DL.. Also, of course, "I don't have enemies." "I've got no enemies" is weird. (Also, "get" = "conseguir" http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/to%20get)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VanessaJ101

"Have got" is present perfect and not to be broken down into "have" and "got". You may find it weird, but it is nevertheless correct, though perhaps not what you would use.

It is often useful to specify where one is from before giving such sweeping statements. I am English, and often use this form.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Soy de los EE.UU. "Have got" is wordy. Simpler is "have." ("to have got" is the same as "to have." I have got enemies = I have enemies.)

In the U.S., it is better writing to avoid unnecessary words.
Here are some references related to good writing. http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/concise.htm http://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/ClearConciseSentences.html http://www2.gsu.edu/~accerl/wordiness/WO.html https://owl.english.purdue.edu/exercises/6/9/24 http://www.schrijven.ugent.be/english/wordiness

Perhaps in England, wordiness is considered OK -- I don't know. But I would be surprised if it were. Here are a couple British websites on eliminating wordiness: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/writing-help/avoiding-cliches http://monreadshoppingcentre.ie/why-eliminating-wordiness-is-very-necessary-for-9/

See this British related syllabus for a course related to England. In it, is a writing grading rubric. For this British course, at least, wordiness is not good. https://college.lclark.edu/live/files/22981-contemporary-england---springpdf Also, this
https://allingm.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/conciseness.pptx

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VanessaJ101

I agree with you that wordiness is not considered good. We also operate on the KISS (keep it short and simple) principle. Nevertheless, Present Perfect is not considered unnecessary - by us!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

I'm puzzled. What is the difference between "have got" and "have"? Why say "have got" when "have" works perfectly well? (and is simpler?)

Salud

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VanessaJ101

As I said, it's Present Perfect (I have eaten, seen, been, got etc.) and would be the answer to a question such as: Have you got a car? or How many stamps have you got?

This is not to say that "Do you have a car?" and "How many stamps do you have?" are not valied questions. They are simply 2 different styles.

I suppose it is similar to things like "I'm going to go shopping after work." being shortened to "I'm going shopping after work." because the 2nd go seems pointless.

BTW: WhatWhere is EE.UU.?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Amiga Vanessa, I was not clear enough before. "Have got" is present perfect. So is "have gotten".

The word "perfect" with respect to tenses literally means "made complete" or "completely done".

A perfect tense refers to things prior to the present, that have occurred in the past. It refers to action previously completed (i.e., in the past.) http://englishplus.com/grammar/00000361.htm

It is formed by using a "past participle"-- that is a clue that it refers to something hat has happened in the past, albeit it can a the recent past.

A present perfect can refer to something that occurred in the past and is ongoing : "I have lived here for fifty years." It can refer to experience up to the present that occurred in the past. . "This is the best day I have ever had."

"[Previously], I have gotten books at this library." This refers to the past.

It can refer to a recent past ("Have I parked in the correct place?" But this is still a reference to the past.

Unfortunately, many people use "have got" to refer to the present. Today, "I have got the book." Here the present perfect is not appropriate, if one means "I have the book." What one should use is the present tense: "Today, I have the book."

"I have no enemies" is present tense. "I have got no enemies" is an inappropriate use of a term referring to a completed past (present perfect) in place of the present tense.

Other references: https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/verbs/present-tense/present-perfect https://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/presentperfect.html http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/verbs.htm#tense

Saludos

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VanessaJ101

Dear S, You are obviously determined about this one, so let's just say you've won, and move on. Bye

1 year ago