"Cat."

Translation:Cat.

August 28, 2014

66 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarthPontifex

Cat = cat? mind blown

September 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathan85554

I know

May 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avaliabrun

Now THIS is a sentence I can translate

January 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schatzie

Cat is an ancient word, and has traveled down many branching language trees. Older than dog.

November 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/henmcb

Felt bored, so here is the full etymological tree for anyone who might be interested:

  • Modern English - cat; comes from:

  • Old English - catt(e)

  • Modern Irish - cat; comes from:

  • Old Irish - catt


After here, both join the same branch:

  • Latin - catt(us/a); comes from:

  • Egyptian (~1069-700 b.c.e.) - čaute; comes from:

  • Early Egyptian - tešau;


As for cognates

  • Scottish Gaelic (a close friend of Irish) - cat (again...);

  • Welsh (a less close friend... let's say aquaintance of Irish) - cath;

  • Swedish + Norwegian+ Dutch - katt;

  • German - Katze;

  • Armenian - Katu


Conclusion

I agree. The word cat has very deep, old and strong linguistic roots, and a lot of friends (I only listed a few cognates; there are many more).

I hope that this will be interesting to anyone curious about the etymology of the word cat.


Source

Wiktionary

July 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dancingirl1

Go raibh maith agat! That deserves a lingot.

March 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacenMallo1

Yes

August 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melenhawenn

Breton: kazh, ar c'hazh

March 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeredithNa

Gato in Spanish and gatoa (phonetically spelt) in Arabic. I had some Saudi students and they taught me that. Our minds were blown. :-D

May 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/megsterftw

Don't Spanish and Arabic share a lot of similarities (mostly in vocabulary)? Due to Moorish influence on the Iberian peninsula from the 8th to 14th centuries.

September 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeredithNa

Yes, absolutely. Most Spanish words that start with "al" are of Arabic origins. I love etymology!

September 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vetyr_Cylni

And also the Russian word kot means cat as well.

August 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John787925

I believe nobody is entirely sure where "dog" comes from. The "canine" and "hound" etymological trees are well established, but "dog" sort of appears in Middle English apparently out of nowhere.

February 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

It goes back at least as far as Old English docga, referring to an unidentified breed of dog; -ga is a known diminutive, and doc- is thought to come from docce (“muscle”), so perhaps it was some sort of proto-bulldog.

February 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kala_captain

It's thought that at one the most point common breed of dog was called docga, and since everyone had docgas it replaced the preciously used words...Very similar to the names Carl once meaning a generic term for man such as huscarl, or Guy becoming a generic term for man.

January 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melenhawenn

We also have a "dogue" in French, it refers to breeds now but traditionally to powerful guard dogs, whatever their breed. Our "bouledogue" obviously derives from bulldog but there could have been successive loans (see bacon or flirt/fleurette-fleureter for instance).

March 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MollyIvano

Say what now????

September 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrJohnHouse

It is quite funny that in a language I've never looked at before (I know French and Italian much better) that is completely strange to me that this is exactly the same as it is in English. Freaking cats.

September 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TechSpeaker

at first i'm like... why is the english being pronounced?

November 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

Hahaha I know right

October 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saeshyra

This is just too hard.

January 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dunk999

At least there's audio for the word English speakers already know how to say. :-)

January 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelirya

Wait for it, you haven't seen "béar" yet...

February 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/superluigi13

Why is the word "cat" so similar in nearly every European language? French-chat, German- katze, Italian- gatto... Is there a Latin cognate or something??

August 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelirya

кіт in Ukrainian, кот in Russian, cath in Welsh, kazh in Breton...

February 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vam1980

Latin would be 'felis', so probably no link there.

August 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/superluigi13

Okay, so actually the word "cat" comes from Late Latin "cattus", which probably came from Late Egyptian "caute" (the c has an accent on it.)

September 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/superluigi13

Oh. That makes it a lot more confusing. Maybe Greek?

September 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

No. The ancient Greek word was αἴλουρος, from which we get the English word “ailurophobia” (fear of cats).

November 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Panthera4

Αίλουρος is feline, the word describing the housecat was γαλή, which also refers to the weasel. They were both used for hunting mice, so the people called them with under one name.

November 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Panthera4

From γαλή, in combination with the latin cattus, originates the modern word, γάτα.

November 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

What about the line from Sophocles’ Ἰχνευταί :

ὡς αἰέλουρος εἰκάσαι πέφυκεν ἢ τὼς πόρδαλις;

It seems to me that “(house)cat” would make more sense than “feline” there.

November 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brigids.em

Who knew early U2 would prove so educational? "An cat dubh" -- the only Irish phrase I knew when I was eleven. :-)

February 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EliTettelbach

I like how simple this word is. Exactly the same as English!

August 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_fanny1D

Some irish words sounds a bit swedish... Or, they're pronounced like, swedish... Haha, I don't know

July 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judah791387

When I hear it said in Irish, it sounds like "Cot". Lucky me the computer accepted it as a tyo

October 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/llshiflet

Totally thought this was a trick question for a second.

May 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorenagay

Yeah, don't get TOO comfy with words like "cat" and "bear"....just wait for "butterfly", "mouse", "deer", and "seal".....

June 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.Blaze.

What about "owl"? (ulchabhán)

June 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ag3n7_z3r0

Hmm... tough one!

March 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MollyIvano

Um,the answer is in your name.

September 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StreedG

YAY! Finally a word I can easily memorize :D

August 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MollyIvano

Well done to youv

September 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KxngDeo.

Doesn't need to be memorized though :P

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

You have to remember that this particular word doesn't have to be memorized, though! (And that cat isn't pronounced "cat").

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andyroo93

Do you think it sounds like she's saying 'cait'? To me, the t sounds a bit palatalised.

October 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CathalKenn

This was really hard

May 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex46462

Meow meow im a cow i said meow meow im a cow!

May 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariel81606

Does anyone ever get this wrong?

June 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TatumKearns

I just could not get that one. Does anyone know a good way for me to remember it?

June 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aglaring

Excuse me please, but i know that the pronunciation of " cat ", in the lesson, is not the same as in Ireland. The speaker's pronunciation, has the emphasis with the vowel: á ( cát ). This is NOT the same situation, as in Irish pronunciation. See here, please. http://it.forvo.com/word/cat/#ga

June 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andyroo93

I take it you mean the pronunciation of the Irish word 'cat' by native Irish speakers is different from the pronunciation of the English word 'cat' by speakers of Hiberno-English?

June 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

This isn't about the pronunciation of the English word "cat". It's about this speakers regional dialect pronunciation of cat. This is not how all "native speakers" of Irish dialects pronounce cat, and isn't the way most non-native speakers are taught to pronounce cat (and those non-native learners in Ireland don't pronounce it like "cat", either).

June 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dquedenfeld16

did anyone else find the pronunciation hard to understand? I had no idea what the audio was saying and ultimately skipped it.

July 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skazani

this word looks like english one but sounds like Polish for cat with is ''kot'' :) it's pronounced just like in Irish

July 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J0W3x

That moment when I write it in polish... Kot and Cat sounds alike... anyone in same situation ?

August 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awesomeguy1006

Cat always mean cat! Why? :/ :\

December 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex46462

awesomeguy1006 because cats be awesome and everyone needs to know how to say it

May 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AudreyMcAd1

Sounded like cait

October 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1162

No, it doesn't. The "t" sound in this exercise is clearly broad, not slender.

You can hear "cait", with the distinctly different slender "t" sound, in the following exercises:
"Cait an fhir" - https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4639391
"Cait na bhfear" - https://www.duolingo.com/comment/11516633
"We like cats and you like dogs." - https://www.duolingo.com/comment/5812479

October 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.fake

Now this sounds as Russian as possible!

March 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathan85554

Why is it the same and three and trí sound the same

May 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/siciIy

guys this is really difficult i don't know if i can get this one

May 30, 2018
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